The Polish Officer

The Polish Officer

by Alan Furst
3.6 25

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Overview

The Polish Officer by Alan Furst

September 1939. As Warsaw falls to Hitler’s Wehrmacht, Captain Alexander de Milja is recruited by the intelligence service of the Polish underground. His mission: to transport the national gold reserve to safety, hidden on a refugee train to Bucharest. Then, in the back alleys and black-market bistros of Paris, in the tenements of Warsaw, with partizan guerrillas in the frozen forests of the Ukraine, and at Calais Harbor during an attack by British bombers, de Milja fights in the war of the shadows in a world without rules, a world of danger, treachery, and betrayal.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781588361004
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/06/2001
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 141
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Often compared to Graham Greene and Eric Ambler, Alan Furst is a master of the spy thriller and one of the great war novelists of our time. He is the author of Night Soldiers, Dark Star, The Polish Officer, and The World at Night. He lives in Sag Harbor, New York.


From the Hardcover edition.

Hometown:

Sag Harbor, New York

Place of Birth:

New York, New York

Education:

B.A., Oberlin College

Customer Reviews

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Polish Officer 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
AXLP More than 1 year ago
Absolutely one of his best in my opinion and I've read all but three. Although perhaps not as likeable as Cason in The World at Night and Red Gold, Capt. de Milja, our hero, may be Furst's most noble character from his historical fiction books. de Milja is a map maker in the Polish army; a "regular" guy, who, when war is thrust upon his world, does what he must, which turns out to be more than he could have imagined he was capable of (standard theme here for Furst). He is in love with his wife who is in a Polish mental hosptial, but he knows he can't really save her. Thier last scene together is very touching and heartbreaking. He has nothing left but to fight for Poland, which he does as a spy. At first not a great spy, but he works his way to that status throughout. the book. I love the way Furst weaves in a character or two from his other books. He also mentions the shooting at the Brasserie Heiniger from "The Night Soldiers" in all his books from this period, which somehow ties them all together, though you don't need to read them in order except for the two I mentioned with Cason. As usual Furst's supporting characters add so much to this book. I always feel like I learn so much from these folks who come and go, live and die and fight the "good" fight. These are all such great books, but I would imagine those that aren't familiar with the genre, or are not WW 2 "savy" may find them a bit hard to read. But for those of you who are, you MUST read these books, especially this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿The Polish Officer¿ is a spy novel set in the early years of World War II in an occupied Europe fending for itself without the help of the Americans. The book is peopled by displaced persons, former military officers, and bandits, all drawn into a seemingly hopeless resistance to the occupying Nazi and Soviet forces in Poland, Russia, and France. That Furst is able to create a story from this world that is appealing to American readers speaks to his prowess as a writer. Although a bit weak on plot, this is a beautifully-written book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I particularly enjoyed this Furst novel for the immediate intensity, and urgency that the characters involved display, from the very beginning of the plot to the end. de Milja and others must make quick decisions, forge alliances, and simply discard ideas, and people, just to survive. Furst's research and fully absorbing writing style should be applauded. Readers with allegences to classic writers of this genre should give Furst an unbaised read. He's one of the best of the contemperaries.
Guest More than 1 year ago
it's better than any airport/wallgreen's 'spy novel'...very close to lecarre...BUT unlike sir john, there is no real character here...in 'the honorable schoolboy', you actually cry for the hero spy who lives undercover...in this book, i had no idea why he put himself at such risk for so many different factions...no depth...but that said, a totally relaitsic (from what i understand) portrait of occupied poland and paris.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read several of the author's fiction novels and this one is not in the same class with those. Perhaps my expectation was to high
SuzannePA More than 1 year ago
this the third furst novel i have read. gave him that much. don't think i'll give him another chance
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gregrosine More than 1 year ago
I love the way Alan Furst can allow you to feel the day to day life of living in occupied Europe during WWII as well as the extraordinary and heroic events. I didn't want this novel to end when it did. I will certainly look for another of his works.
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