Politics

Politics

by Aristotle
4.0 5
ISBN-10:
1605203289
ISBN-13:
9781605203287
Pub. Date:
11/01/2008
Publisher:
Cosimo
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Overview

Politics

Intellectually stimulating work describes the ideal state and ponders how it can bring about the most desirable life for its citizens. Both heavily influenced by and critical of Plato's Republic and Laws, Politics is the distillation of a lifetime of thought and observation. The great Benjamin Jowett translation.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781605203287
Publisher: Cosimo
Publication date: 11/01/2008
Pages: 368
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.82(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction
Note on the Text and Translation
Analysis of the Argument
The Politics
Notes
Glossary
Index of Names

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Politics 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
manirul01 More than 1 year ago
Awesome....!Beautiful....!Wonderful....!I really enjoy it.....!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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FaceMan More than 1 year ago
Mr. Aristiotle has some disturbing views; he believes that women, children, and animals are lower in importance than Man. He feels that Man is the superior being on this planet. He allows feels that women and children have no rights and are to serve the man. He also contradicts Socrates' wisdom on almost every tenet. He speaks lowly of him as well, which is egoistic of Aristotle, plus, depicts his jealously of Socrates acumen and veneration. Surprisingly, people think Aristotle as the Top Philosopher...He is not; Socrates was and is. Plato is excellent, because he writes for Socrates and also believes is equality and not segregation and elitism. Aristotle has been illuminated more due to the fact that he was a prolific writer and ostensibly wanted to convince or condition people to his views, which were oppressive and discriminatory. Moreover, he writes in a dry, sometimes curt, and long-winded manner, which is boring and disengages the reader, mainly due to his ideals, but also in the manner he chooses to express it, which is devoid of Socrates' way. Read Socrates and Plato; use Aristotle to compare and contrast inferior thinking or a compromised psyche.