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The Portrait of a Lady
     

The Portrait of a Lady

3.2 21
by Henry James
 

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One of the great heroines of American literature, Isabel Archer, journeys to Europe in order to, as Henry James writes in his 1908 Preface, “affront her destiny.” James began The Portrait of a Lady without a plot or subject, only the slim but provocative notion of a young woman taking control of her fate. The result is a richly imagined study of an

Overview

One of the great heroines of American literature, Isabel Archer, journeys to Europe in order to, as Henry James writes in his 1908 Preface, “affront her destiny.” James began The Portrait of a Lady without a plot or subject, only the slim but provocative notion of a young woman taking control of her fate. The result is a richly imagined study of an American heiress who turns away her suitors in an effort to first establish—and then protect—her independence. But Isabel’s pursuit of spiritual freedom collapses when she meets the captivating Gilbert Osmond. “James’s formidable powers of observation, his stance as a kind of bachelor recorder of human doings in which he is not involved,” writes Hortense Calisher, “make him a first-class documentarian, joining him to that great body of storytellers who amass what formal history cannot.”

Product Details

BN ID:
2940016226712
Publisher:
Wishland Publishing
Publication date:
02/15/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Related Subjects

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
April 15, 1843
Date of Death:
February 28, 1916
Place of Birth:
New York, New York
Place of Death:
London, England
Education:
Attended school in France and Switzerland; Harvard Law School, 1862-63

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The Portrait of a Lady 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yet another story about faulty human nature. Just like in the Great Gatsby, the story goes over a typical parasitic behavior of an average upper class woman, who believes that she is somewhat special just because she was born this way. Stories like this one honestly make me sick.
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