The Power and the Glory

The Power and the Glory

by Graham Greene
4.2 26

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Overview

The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene

Winner of the Hawthornden Prize.

During a vicious persecution of the clergy in Mexico, the 'whisky priest' is on the run and the police are closing in. But compassion and humanity impel him toward his destiny.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780670569793
Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date: 02/22/1946
Pages: 276
Product dimensions: 20.00(w) x 20.00(h) x 20.00(d)

About the Author

GRAHAM GREENE (1904-1991), whose long life nearly spanned the length of the twentieth century, was one of its greatest novelists. Educated at Berkhamsted School and Balliol College, Oxford, he started his career as a sub-editor of the London Times. He began to attract notice as a novelist with his fourth book, Orient Express, in 1932. In 1935, he trekked across northern Liberia, his first experience in Africa, told in A Journey Without Maps (1936). He converted to Catholicism in 1926, an edifying decision, and reported on religious persecution in Mexico in 1938 in The Lawless Roads, which served as a background for his famous The Power and the Glory, one of several “Catholic” novels (Brighton Rock, The Heart of the Matter, The End of the Affair). During the war he worked for the British secret service in Sierra Leone; afterward, he began wide-ranging travels as a journalist, which were reflected in novels such as The Quiet American, Our Man in Havana, The Comedians, Travels with My Aunt, The Honorary Consul, The Human Factor, Monsignor Quixote, and The Captain and the Enemy. As well as his many novels, Graham Greene wrote several collections of short stories, four travel books, six plays, two books of autobiography, A Sort of Life and Ways of Escape, two biographies, and four books for children. He also contributed hundreds of essays and film and book reviews to The Spectator and other journals, many of which appear in the late collection Reflections. Most of his novels have been filmed, including The Third Man, which the author first wrote as a film treatment. Graham Greene was named Companion of Honour and received the Order of Merit among numerous other awards.

JOHN UPDIKE (1932-2009) was the author of more than sixty books, including collections of short stories, poems, and criticism. His novels have been honored with the Pulitzer Prize (twice), the National Book Award, and the Howells Medal of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Hugging the Shore, an earlier collection of essays and reviews, received the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism. He died in January 2009.

Date of Birth:

October 2, 1904

Date of Death:

April 3, 1991

Place of Birth:

Berkhamsted, England

Place of Death:

Vevey, Switzerland

Education:

Balliol College, Oxford

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The Power and the Glory 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Power and the Glory by Graham Green presents a fascinating and unique interpretation of religion and how it affects human nature. The most striking image presented by this interpretation is the lead character, a whisky priest with a bastard child. He stands as a paradoxical figure within himself, a highly respected official distributing confessions and baptisms to the locals, yet he is flawed inside and out grappling with his faith and to what purpose he serves. However, Green did not write this novel purely to state that priests are humans too, flawed just as they rest of us. Instead, the novel reaches deeper as if religion in its traditional, most rigid form pulls down a veil over our eyes. These poverty-stricken desperate individuals living under an oppressive Mexican government look to an equally desperate man whose only concern is his own fruitless survival. They are blind, still governed by the ways of a meaningless, irrelevant church. In the end, as the whiskey priest is finally hunted down by the authorities, he dies suddenly and without purpose or meaning. Green brilliantly contrasts his death with a mother reading to her children of the mightiest and most noble of God's followers dying triumphantly in a blaze of glory. There is no heroic battle, no glory and ultimately no power. He is simply a man and nothing more.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had no idea about this book until I had to read in my Honors Lit. class. The chapters are set up to where you have to keep going to remember the plot. You have to keep reading. The story is wonderful and I suggest you read it in about two days because of the story setup. This is a book worth reading.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was interesting.It teaches a good leeson about faith and love.In a state in Mexico,the church is outlawed.The priest has to run like a criminal.In fact a bandit who killed policemen a was hunted less than him.Although the priest is a good man,his conscience can not let him forget about his past sins.His guilt lead him to deticate his life to the church untill his death.Even though the church was a aware of his past sins,they still declared him a saint.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is my all time favorite book and really conveys a wonderful message about the judgements of others and the inability to attain perfection - regardless of one's role in life. The priest in this story is one of the most well developed characters of any book I've read, and forces the reader to bestow compassion towards his plea. This novel helped me re-consider the judgements I once so commonly made about people... the author takes you inside the mind of a percieved saint and allows you to realize that he too struggles with internal conflicts.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i had to read this book for my ap lit class recently, and like the headline says, i actually enjoyed it. even though i'm not catholic (to tell the truth, i'm not even mildly religious at all) i enjoyed the book. halfway through, i even wished i knew more about the bible so that i could gain more from graham greene's book. i'm grateful to my teacher for having chosen this book to read. i'd say he has pretty good taste.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The story of a man who is the truest saint and the truest sinner at the same time. A profound perspective on faith and grace and human nature. It also exposes (weaved into the story) a little known episode of Mexican History in which Catholics were actually persecuted for their faith. Many shouted as they were executed, 'Long live Christ the King!' I recommend this book for anyone, religious or not. This interesting story helped me understand human nature better. I can't wait to read another of Greene's books! (Although I'm afraid they may not measure up to this one).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic! I had to read this book for my college seminar class.  It was by far the best book we read all semester. I go to a catholic college and was dreading reading a book about religion because I thought that I wouldn't understand it (I'm not very familiar with Catholicism) However, I found my self wanting to read it again and again. It is life changing and so thought-provoking.  
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ExiledNewYorker More than 1 year ago
The Power and the Glory is a well told, complex tale focused on a core moral dilemma. Green expertly weaves multiple stories in ways that surprise and move. It's a manhunt set in the context of the clash of differing fundamental truths, all made real by the flawed characters on both sides.
AbbyAK More than 1 year ago
This was one of Greene's early novels, one that came out of his own experience in Mexico. Set there in the 1930's when the Catholic Church was outlawed by the government, it is the story of the fictional "last" priest on the run in one of the Mexican states. But the book deals with many issues, and is not to be considered just a "Catholic" book. At the heart of it is man's search for meaning. Greene's prose alone is worth the read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I highly recommend this book. It is very realistic. I wanted to like the priest, but nothing justifies certain actions. Good reading.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The Power and the Glory is gripping from the outset, Greene is a master of mystery and suspense. Yet, as the story progresses, we see that it's not a mystery, as such. This is about a man's struggle with religion and with life. I'm not religious, but I couldn't help but relate to the poor 'Whisky Priest'. If you read this and get to the end, you will not be disappointed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Definitely requires knowledge of Catholism to fully understand this book and to understand the symoblism
Guest More than 1 year ago
seems boring at first, but as you read on it becomes intriguing, and you get involved in the beautiful story.