The Power of Place, the Problem of Time: Aboriginal Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism

The Power of Place, the Problem of Time: Aboriginal Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism

by Keith Thor Carlson

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Overview

The Power of Place, the Problem of Time: Aboriginal Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism by Keith Thor Carlson

The Indigenous communities of the Lower Fraser River, British Columbia (a group commonly called the Stó:lõ), have historical memories and senses of identity deriving from events, cultural practices, and kinship bonds that had been continuously adapting long before a non-Native visited the area directly. In The Power of Place, the Problem of Time, Keith Thor Carlson re-thinks the history of Native-newcomer relations from the unique perspective of a classically trained historian who has spent nearly two decades living, working, and talking with the Stó:lõ peoples.

Stó:lõ actions and reactions during colonialism were rooted in their pre-colonial experiences and customs, which coloured their responses to events such as smallpox outbreaks or the gold rush. Profiling tensions of gender and class within the community, Carlson emphasizes the elasticity of collective identity. A rich and complex history, The Power of Place, the Problem of Time looks to both the internal and the external factors which shaped a society during a time of great change and its implications extend far beyond the study region.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781442699960
Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division
Publication date: 12/31/2010
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 911,720
File size: 5 MB

About the Author

Keith Thor Carlson is an associate professor in the Department of History at the University of Saskatchewan.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Forward by Sonny McHalsie

SECTION ONE - INTRODUCTION




2

Chapter One -- Encountering Lower Fraser River Indigenous Identity and Historical Consciousness



39

SECTION TWO - THE UNDERPINNINGS OF STÓ:LÕ COLLECTIVE IDENTITIES



40

Chapter Two -- Economy, Geography, Environment and Historical Identity



63

Chapter Three - Spiritual Forces of Historical Affiliation



90

SECTION THREE - MOVEMENTS ACROSS TIME AND SPACE



91

Chapter Four - From the Great Flood to Smallpox



134

Chapter Five -- Events, Migrations, and Affiliations in the "Post-contact World"



185

SECTION FOUR - RESTRICTED MOVEMENT AND FRACTURES IDENTITY



186

Chapter Six - Identity in the Emerging Colonial Order



217

Chapter Seven - Identity in the Face of Missionaries and the Anti-Potlatching Law



252

SECTION FIVE - EXPANDED MOVEMENT AND THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN 'STÓ:LÕ" COLLECTIVE IDENTITY



253

Chapter Eight - Reservations for the Queen's Birthday Celebrations, 1864-1876



280

Chapter Nine - Collective Governance and the Lynching of Louie Sam



317

SECTION - CONCLUSION



318

Chapter Ten - Entering the Twentieth Century



333

MAPS AND FIGURES



333

NOTES


What People are Saying About This

Chris Friday

'Keith Thor Carlson has tackled an immensely complicated topic with grace, humility, and compassion. The Power of Place, the Problem of Time offers readers an opportunity to understand First Nations peoples as something more than stock, static figures who either disappeared or got frozen in time. He uncovers and explains the complexities of social relations, cultural change, and historical meanings of identities—political and cultural—that will stand as a guide for any wanting to consider the topic in the next century.'

Cole Harris

'In this strikingly original book, Keith Thor Carlson offers a fascinating account of the changing identities of the Stó:lõ as they responded to smallpox, the fur trade, a gold rush, missionaries, settlers, and colonial land policies. He shows that different segments of pre-contact Stó:lõ communities constructed layered identities for use within the various levels of their society, and that during the tumultuous years between 1780 and 1906, individuals drew, as need be, on these diverging constructions. Drastic change was not new to the Stó:lõ people; they had renegotiated their identities before and did so again.'

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