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Practical Perforce
     

Practical Perforce

5.0 1
by Laura Wingerd
 

When developers build software, they're able to keep track of all the different versions and all the components they use with software configuration management (SCM) systems. One of the more popular SCM products is Perforce.

Authored by Perforce's own VP of product technology, Practical Perforce is the ideal complement to the existing product manual,

Overview

When developers build software, they're able to keep track of all the different versions and all the components they use with software configuration management (SCM) systems. One of the more popular SCM products is Perforce.

Authored by Perforce's own VP of product technology, Practical Perforce is the ideal complement to the existing product manual, focusing less on the 'how" and more on the "why" and "when." The book is not only a helpful introduction to Perforce,it's an enlightening resource for those already familiar with this versatile SCM product. Whether you're a programmer, product manager, or build engineer, you stand to benefit from the many insider tips and ideas presented in this convenient guide.

Practical Perforce is divided into two main parts. Part I offers a whirlwind technical tour, complete with careful descriptions of basic and advanced Perforce commands designed to give you a baseline knowledge. Part II describes the big picture-using Perforce in a collaborative software development. It outlines recommended best practices and quickly shows how to implement them with the Perforce operations introduced in Part I. Throughout the book, you'll learn how to maximize Perforce so it completes tasks like these in the most efficient manner possible:

  • Keep track of changes as you conduct concurrent parallel work on files
  • Log activity
  • Generate reports on who did what when
  • Compare, merge and branch files
  • Store files and file configurations
  • Restore lost bug fixes

Recognizing the pitfalls and practices of an SCM system like Perforce is absolutely essential to producing good software. Now, with Practical Perforce, you have the edge you need to ensure success.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780596101855
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/01/2005
Pages:
362
Sales rank:
1,351,094
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.19(h) x 0.85(d)

Meet the Author

Laura Wingerd is currently vice president of product technology at Perforce Software. She divides her time between promoting sound SCM to Perforce's technical staff and promoting Perforce to the software development industry. She joined Perforce in 1997, just as the company moved out of the garage of its founder, Christopher Seiwald. She and Seiwald wrote "High-Level Best Practices in Software Configuration Management," a white paper widely referenced in books and articles. Prior to joining Perforce, Laura worked at Sybase, first developing a software build system for a skunk-works development project, then orchestrating a massive conversion of a build system for core database and networking products.

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Practical Perforce 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Are you a programmer, a project manager, or a build engineer involved with software development? If you are, then this book is for you! Author Laura Wingerd, has done an outstanding job of writing a book that presents Perforce's potential as a software configuration management tool. Wingerd, begins by describing how Perforce stores files and directories in its repository, the depot. Then, the author surveys the Perforce commands you're most likely to use for basic software development. She continues with a review of the Perforce resolve operation: what it's for, when you do it, and what you do with it. Next, the author discusses the mechanics of branching and integrating. Then she looks at how to use labels and jobs in Perforce. She also focuses on aspects of control and automation, starting with a look at controlling depot and file access, including access to files in other Perforce domains. Then, she takes a step back from Perforce to look at the roadmap of the software life cycle: the mainline model. The author continues by introducing conventions, policies, and techniques for managing codelines in a Perforce system. Next, she looks at the care and feeding of release codelines. Then, the author looks at creating development codelines, working in development codelines, keeping development codelines up to date, and delivering completed development work into parent codelines. Finally, the author looks at using staging streams to manage frequent releases. This most excellent book will help Perforce users understand why Perforce works the way it does. Most users will come to this level of understanding on their own eventually!