The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: A Novel

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: A Novel

by Muriel Spark
3.8 16

NOOK Book(eBook)

$10.99 $17.99 Save 39% Current price is $10.99, Original price is $17.99. You Save 39%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Prime of Miss Jean Brodie 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book all in one day while I was laying out on the lake. I made my friends read it, and they all loved it too. Some joked that I reminded them of Miss Jean Brodie!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sparks is a consumate writer and her descriptions of this English Teacher's life and that of her pupil's will touch your heart. She has truly captured English eccentricities that carry the novel into your memory. A must have for any Anglophile.
KrisDinnison More than 1 year ago
I had seen the wonderful movie based on this book with it's unforgettable star Maggie Smith. But I had never read the book. Spark invokes a world where girls on the border between innocence and adulthood. Miss Brodie, who we are reminded time and again is in her prime, uses her position as a teacher to usher these girls into being something special. Spark does an amazing job of creating complex, multidimensional characters, and there's no clear heroine or villain in the whole book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sup.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
alc1967 More than 1 year ago
Another boring "classic". This book is described as a "timeless classic" but it is nothing of the kind. The author flits between times and scenes with flashbacks and flash forwards and it is very confusing to try to keep everything straight. There is not enough personal information on each of the school girls to give them much more than names to fill in a sentence. The character of Jean Brodie is more piteable than interesting. She sounds like a frustrated person and thinks very highly of herself when there is really nothing of substance to base that opinion on. In fact, there are no characters in this book that would be inspiring. They are all petty people with no redeeming qualities. I wonder if the author was as screwed up as all of the characters in this book. It was a boring waste of time and left me feeling irritated.
Holleyhock More than 1 year ago
I finished the book. I didn't care for the book that much. My book club is reading it. I probably would not have read this book otherwise. I didn't care for the characters in the book. Reminded me too much of my high school days and the cliques that form with young school aged girls. It was even more disturbing that a teacher was part of the problem. I like the idea of being independent and a critical thinker, but not at the expense of others.
angelseverywhere More than 1 year ago
good read enjoyed this book even rented the movie ..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Children, take your stuoid game somewhere ekse and play. This is a book review site for adults to disuss books. Go to facebook, myspace, a blog or the sand box but get off here.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A useful approach to analyzing The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (by Muriel Sparks) is to examine the school as a microcosm of civilization (much as William Golding intended his little island to be examined in Lord of the Flies), in this case a civilization with a particularly English culture. It has adult teachers who champion various views and children who must live under the effects those views create when put into practice. The school has a traditional order which Miss Jean Brodie, a fascist and then national socialist sympathizer, seeks to overturn by varying from the curriculum and structure of the school as it developed over time. Brodie is very intelligent and very careful to cultivate an appreciation for 'the true, the good, and the beautiful' in her students initially. However, rather than follow the traditional order and curriculum established within the school, she begins to teach off-subject and off-location, then forms a select group from her students which she distinguishes from her other students and attempts to indoctrinate this special group with her views. Indeed, Brodie attempts to cultivate this special group in a manner akin to the ¿Aryan¿ supermen championed by Hitler. The group even contains a scapegoat member who Sparks carefully identifies as non-Jewish. Rather, Mary MacGregor is an Irish-Catholic (a group long suffering under the conquering English). By being non-Jewish, Sparks illustrates that scapegoats need not always be Jewish (the 'scapegoat' can take different forms) and that England has its own history of ill-treatment towards those of non-Anglican, non-English origin. The story's scapegoat, Mary, is always kept as a part of the group and always treated as the least of the group ¿ she is frequently belittled and insulted - so as to enable feelings of superiority among other members of the group; who in turn are each very careful not to become too friendly with Mary. This process also carefully illustrates to the group that a failure to please Miss Brodie by agreeing with the ideology she espouses will subject them to a similar fate. Moreover, Sparks, a Catholic herself, wishes to illustrate that Catholicism may have harnessed Jean Brodie¿s formidable intellect and imagination for good rather than the more sinister outcome that arises as the book carries forward. As a fascist who becomes an even more extreme national socialist as the story goes on, Brodie is a pseudo-Nietzschean in the sense that she clearly agrees with (but also twists) Nietzsche¿s argument for a new implementation of ¿noble virtue¿ as against the ¿slave morality¿ represented by Christianity and other forms of religion that require recognition of traditions, obedience to ¿commands of God,¿ especially those commands that require a person to show care or concern for ¿lesser¿ people. To Nietzsche, those who can must become commanders and law-givers. Society must never exist for its own sake, but only as ¿a foundation and scaffolding by means of which a select class of beings may be able to elevate themselves to their higher duties [which is to say] to a higher existence.¿ (Beyond Good and Evil). National socialists turned to this argument and developed the idea of a super-race. This super-race is to replace God and become the law-giver and commander of all the other supposedly 'lesser' races. Although Brodie only gradually reveals this as the basis of her thought, her creation of a special class of students early on combined with the belittling of other hints at where she intends to lead her group. Ultimately, like the Lord of the Flies, this book presents a question of how a civilization might survive when barbarianism arises within the ranks. In this case, it is the barbarianism of a totalitarian ideology and it matters not whether that ideology is ultimately fascism, communism, socialism, national socialism, or perhaps in some respects, capitalism. Such ideologies, which create a simplified view of the
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hole result one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've been wondering why you all do this. And what exactly do you do