ISBN-10:
0137176872
ISBN-13:
9780137176878
Pub. Date:
01/28/1991
Publisher:
Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Principles of Refrigeration / Edition 3

Principles of Refrigeration / Edition 3

by Roy J. Dossat

Hardcover

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Overview

Principles of Refrigeration / Edition 3

This book provides a detailed, applications-oriented treatment of the mechanical refrigeration cycle, associated equipment, component design, and system operation. It teaches users how processes can be broken down into fundamental principles so that they can develop analytical skills, correctly analyze and troubleshoot systems, and embark upon successful careers as technicians, technologists, and engineers. A four-part organization covers mechanical refrigeration and food preservation, the thermodynamic processes of refrigeration systems, ideal and real refrigeration processes, and refrigeration system components. For individuals studying for a career in the refrigeration field.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780137176878
Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Publication date: 01/28/1991
Edition description: 3rd ed
Pages: 640
Product dimensions: 7.99(w) x 10.00(h) x (d)

Read an Excerpt

Principles of Refrigeration has been one of the foundation textbooks in the refrigeration field since Roy Dossat wrote the first edition in 1961. Through four additional editions, Mr. Dossat presented the fundamentals of refrigeration theory, components and systems to students who were preparing to enter an occupation rich with opportunities. I am honored that Mr. Dossat selected me to carry on his tradition of excellence by awarding me the opportunity to write the fifth edition of his textbook.

Having taught HVAC/R students at Ferris State University I have discovered the strengths and weaknesses that students have in developing the study habits and analytical skills they need to prepare themselves as successful technicians, technologists and engineers. I know from personal experience that if students graduate without the ability to build upon their educational experience, they will be limited in their advancement and opportunities. If an instructor can teach students how processes can be broken down into the fundamental principles, they will be able to correctly analyze and troubleshoot systems and processes that were not presented in a book or classroom activities. I have used this information, along with feedback from many faculty and graduates who used the previous editions of this book, as the basis for writing the fifth edition. The following paragraphs outline some of the significant changes in the text.

  • This book is intended for students of two- and four-year refrigeration programs who have previously completed a fundamental course in refrigeration systems. Although such a course is not a prerequisite, this edition was written to advance the student's knowledge of refrigeration systems by presenting more detailed information about the refrigeration cycle, component design and system operation than is normally found in an introductory text. The book presents the science behind the operation of systems as a method of building solid analytical skills that will raise the student above his or her peers when it comes to determining the cause of system malfunctions and inefficiencies and to selecting the best component to modify a system or replace a failed part.
  • The first eleven chapters of the book have been significantly enhanced. The thermodynamics, heat transfer, mechanics and physics topics have been expanded. Rather than a review, these topics are now thoroughly explained in a manner that allows a student to comprehend the sciences related to refrigeration processes. The information develops the foundation needed to understand the underlying theory of refrigeration component and system operation. This part of the book may be a comprehensive review for students in programs where these subjects are taught as separate courses, but it is also an excellent presentation for those who use this book as the primary resource for this information.
  • All of the information presented in Parts 1 through 3 is used throughout the remainder of the text to explain how refrigeration components function. There is no esoteric or "nice-to-know" information presented in this section, so classroom time can be used more efficiently. The refrigeration cycles show how changes in system variables are transferred through the system. This information develops the reader's analytical skills.
  • The book presents the formulas, units and proofs that support the information presented in the chapters in Parts 2, 3 and 4. The mathematical material is intended to be a resource in developing the relationships that exist in the processes rather than as a mathematical exercise. These relationships will be applied throughout the remainder of the text; the formulas will not. The chapters can be just as effective in training a technician without the associated formulas, but they are there to show from whence the information presented in the chapter was derived. In support of this presentation method, all of the mathematics related to the chapter material is presented in the last section of the chapter labeled "Optional Analysis." This section can be skipped or assigned as extra credit material.
  • The formulas are presented in Inch-Pound and System International units. All variables are written with the appropriate units to show students how to properly approach problems by applying the fundamental relationships. This reduces the memorization of formulas and increases the understanding of the interrelationships between the sciences. The use of SI units also exposes students to the associated methods of measuring variables, so they become familiar with the information found on product literature and equipment nameplates. The formulas and examples are used to show relationships without making the book appear to be a engineering text.
  • Most of the topics in the 4th edition remain in this edition, although they have been reorganized to improve the flow of information. The entire book was rewritten using a style that is more closely related with books, manuals and other material read by today's students.
  • Some of the chapters that appeared too long have been split into two smaller chapters, so they are easier for the instructor to build lectures around and less intimidating to students. Each chapter also includes true-and-false questions along with multiple-choice questions to highlight the important information presented in the chapter.

Through these and other changes, I have taken a very important, comprehensive and effective resource and made it easier for both student and instructor to use and comprehend the information. Through the use of smaller sentences, fewer assumptions, more explanation and a logical presentation format, I believe I have succeeded in developing a new edition of the book that honors Mr. Dossat's intent to help those who have chosen the refrigeration field for their career. This edition will be more appealing to faculty who currently use the book and more inviting to those who are looking for a comprehensive textbook for their students.

Thomas Horan

Table of Contents

I. INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICAL REFRIGERATION AND FOOD PRESERVATION.

1. Introduction to Refrigeration.
2. Food Preservation.
3. Preservation and Storage Processes.

II. INTRODUCTION TO THE THERMODYNAMIC PROCESSES OF REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS.

4. Mass, Motion, Force, and Work.
5. Internal Energy, Heat, and Temperature.
6. The Properties of Vapors.
7. Gas Laws.
8. Ideal Gas Processes.

III. INTRODUCTION TO THE IDEAL AND REAL REFRIGERATION PROCESSES.

9. The Refrigeration Cycle.
10. The Theoretical Saturated Vapor-Compression Cycle.
11. The Actual Vapor-Compression Cycle.

IV. REFRIGERATION SYSTEM COMPONENTS.

12. Characteristics of Refrigerants.
13. Refrigerants.
14. Evaporators.
15. Selecting Evaporators.
16. Compressor Operating Characteristics.
17. Compressor Design.
18. Compressor Lubricating Oils.
19. Condensers.
20. Cooling Towers and Evaporative Condensers.
21. Refrigerant Expansion Valves.
22. Additional Types of Refrigerant Metering Devices.
23. Refrigeration System Piping.
24. Secondary System Components.
25. System Balancing.
26. Cascade and Absorption Refrigeration Systems.

Preface

Principles of Refrigeration has been one of the foundation textbooks in the refrigeration field since Roy Dossat wrote the first edition in 1961. Through four additional editions, Mr. Dossat presented the fundamentals of refrigeration theory, components and systems to students who were preparing to enter an occupation rich with opportunities. I am honored that Mr. Dossat selected me to carry on his tradition of excellence by awarding me the opportunity to write the fifth edition of his textbook.

Having taught HVAC/R students at Ferris State University I have discovered the strengths and weaknesses that students have in developing the study habits and analytical skills they need to prepare themselves as successful technicians, technologists and engineers. I know from personal experience that if students graduate without the ability to build upon their educational experience, they will be limited in their advancement and opportunities. If an instructor can teach students how processes can be broken down into the fundamental principles, they will be able to correctly analyze and troubleshoot systems and processes that were not presented in a book or classroom activities. I have used this information, along with feedback from many faculty and graduates who used the previous editions of this book, as the basis for writing the fifth edition. The following paragraphs outline some of the significant changes in the text.

  • This book is intended for students of two- and four-year refrigeration programs who have previously completed a fundamental course in refrigeration systems. Although such a course is not a prerequisite, this edition was written to advance thestudent's knowledge of refrigeration systems by presenting more detailed information about the refrigeration cycle, component design and system operation than is normally found in an introductory text. The book presents the science behind the operation of systems as a method of building solid analytical skills that will raise the student above his or her peers when it comes to determining the cause of system malfunctions and inefficiencies and to selecting the best component to modify a system or replace a failed part.
  • The first eleven chapters of the book have been significantly enhanced. The thermodynamics, heat transfer, mechanics and physics topics have been expanded. Rather than a review, these topics are now thoroughly explained in a manner that allows a student to comprehend the sciences related to refrigeration processes. The information develops the foundation needed to understand the underlying theory of refrigeration component and system operation. This part of the book may be a comprehensive review for students in programs where these subjects are taught as separate courses, but it is also an excellent presentation for those who use this book as the primary resource for this information.
  • All of the information presented in Parts 1 through 3 is used throughout the remainder of the text to explain how refrigeration components function. There is no esoteric or "nice-to-know" information presented in this section, so classroom time can be used more efficiently. The refrigeration cycles show how changes in system variables are transferred through the system. This information develops the reader's analytical skills.
  • The book presents the formulas, units and proofs that support the information presented in the chapters in Parts 2, 3 and 4. The mathematical material is intended to be a resource in developing the relationships that exist in the processes rather than as a mathematical exercise. These relationships will be applied throughout the remainder of the text; the formulas will not. The chapters can be just as effective in training a technician without the associated formulas, but they are there to show from whence the information presented in the chapter was derived. In support of this presentation method, all of the mathematics related to the chapter material is presented in the last section of the chapter labeled "Optional Analysis." This section can be skipped or assigned as extra credit material.
  • The formulas are presented in Inch-Pound and System International units. All variables are written with the appropriate units to show students how to properly approach problems by applying the fundamental relationships. This reduces the memorization of formulas and increases the understanding of the interrelationships between the sciences. The use of SI units also exposes students to the associated methods of measuring variables, so they become familiar with the information found on product literature and equipment nameplates. The formulas and examples are used to show relationships without making the book appear to be a engineering text.
  • Most of the topics in the 4th edition remain in this edition, although they have been reorganized to improve the flow of information. The entire book was rewritten using a style that is more closely related with books, manuals and other material read by today's students.
  • Some of the chapters that appeared too long have been split into two smaller chapters, so they are easier for the instructor to build lectures around and less intimidating to students. Each chapter also includes true-and-false questions along with multiple-choice questions to highlight the important information presented in the chapter.

Through these and other changes, I have taken a very important, comprehensive and effective resource and made it easier for both student and instructor to use and comprehend the information. Through the use of smaller sentences, fewer assumptions, more explanation and a logical presentation format, I believe I have succeeded in developing a new edition of the book that honors Mr. Dossat's intent to help those who have chosen the refrigeration field for their career. This edition will be more appealing to faculty who currently use the book and more inviting to those who are looking for a comprehensive textbook for their students.

Thomas Horan

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