Prisoner of Tehran

Prisoner of Tehran

by Marina Nemat
4.6 13

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Overview

Prisoner of Tehran by Marina Nemat

"Prisoner of Tehran is a harrowing journey, an account of growth under the darkest of circumstances and a trail of faith in the face of overwhelming horror. It is skillfully constructed with a keen sense of suspense." �Quill & Quire

Translated into twenty-two languages, Prisoner of Tehran by Marina Nemat has become an international bestseller and is now available in paperback for the first time. In this heartbreaking, triumphant, and elegantly written memoir, Nemat tells the heart-pounding story of her life as a young girl in Iran during the early days pf Ayatollah Khomeini's brutal Islamic Revolution.

In January 1982, Nemat, at just sixteen years old, was arrested, tortured, and sentenced to death for political crimes. Until then, her life in Tehran had centered around school, summer parties at the lake, and her crush on Andre, the young man she had met at church. But when math and history were subordinated to the study of the Koran and politcal propaganda, Marina protested. Her teacher replied, "If you don't like it, leave." She did, and, to her surprise, other students followed.

Lyrical, passionate, and suffused throughout with grace and sensitivity, Marina Nemat's memoir is like no other. Her search for emotional redemption envelops her jailers, her husband and his family, and the country of birth�each of which she grants the greatest gift of all: forgiveness.

MARINA NEMAT grew up in Tehran, Iran. In 1991, she emigrated to Toronto, Ontario, where she now lives with her husband, Andre, and their two sons.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780670066124
Publisher: Viking Canada
Publication date: 07/28/2008
Pages: 304

About the Author

Marina Nemat grew up in Tehran, Iran. In 1991, she emigrated to Toronto, Ontario, where she now lives with her husband, Andre, and their two sons.

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Prisoner of Tehran: A Memoir 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
BabyBoomerSKC More than 1 year ago
Her story is quite compelling. I couldn't put it down. I had times were I smiled, and all too often cried. Totally awesome and well written.
katyd More than 1 year ago
I found this book very moving and frightening to think of a world where this kind of life would be the norm. Well written and absorbing. I'm glad she has a much better life now and escaped from this tyranny.
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lesiajp More than 1 year ago
I just finished reading this book. It was absolutely amazing!! In our lives, many times we think we have it hard -- but Marina's life was absolutely incredibly horrific! Even her words cannot fully describe how she felt being arrested and in prison and what she went through on a daily basis just to survive. An incredible read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not only is this story captivating and spellbounding, it's very well written as well. Beautiful imagery and deep emotionality make this book one of my favorites.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book 3 times. I haven't read something this good in along time I enjoyed reading about her life
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book would be more interesting if it told the truth. It's not a memoir, but a fictionalized account which has provoked angry reactions amongst people who were actually incarcerated in Iran during these years. Not very honest.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the most moving stories I have ever read. Marina Nemat¿s strength, courage, and compassion are astounding.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This memoir is amazing. Being a Christian and reading about Marina Nemat's struggle with Christ or death has made me rethink what I really consider a sacrifice to be. Coming from an American Christian culture, I cannot even begin to understand the type of faith a Christian in a Muslim country must have. Anyone who reads this book will find their own morals questioned. And yet, Prisoner of Tehran is not even all about religion. This is Marina Nemat's story. A deep read, but so worth it.