ISBN-10:
0130229679
ISBN-13:
9780130229670
Pub. Date:
05/03/2000
Publisher:
Prentice Hall
Problem Solving and Programming Concepts / Edition 5

Problem Solving and Programming Concepts / Edition 5

by Maureen Sprankle

Hardcover

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780130229670
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Publication date: 05/03/2000
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 500
Product dimensions: 8.33(w) x 10.91(h) x 0.76(d)

About the Author

Maureen Sprankle is a Professor Emeritus at the College of the Redwoods, in Eureka, CA. She received her M.B.A. (emphasis in Computer Information Systems) and B.A. in Music from Humboldt State University, and her B.A. in Mathematics from Pepperdine University. In addition to teaching, Maureen has worked as a consultant in microcomputers for business and education, as a freelance Programmer/Analyst (business and scientific applications), and as a Scientific Programmer/Analyst Research Programmer in the space industry. After retiring from teaching, she and her husband of 43 years, Dr. Norman Sprankle, moved to the Oregon coast, where they both enjoy traveling, teaching, computers, the theater, and the out of doors. Her hobbies include music and reading.

Jim Hubbard is a software architect and the President of Healthware Solutions, LLC. Jim received his M.I.S. degree from Humboldt State University. He has held the position of CIO at Healthware Solutions, LLC. With 26 years of experience in the field of software development and implementation, Jim provides a valuable industry perspective to problem solving and programming.

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

A knowledge of problem solving and programming concepts is a necessity for those who work with computers, either as programmers or as users. Unfortunately, many students have greater difficulty with problem solving than they do with the syntax of computer languages or applications. Since problem-solving concepts are similar in all languages and applications, students can learn them in one preliminary course. Then, when they move on to language and application courses, both the students and the instructor can concentrate on syntax. This arrangement not only saves time but also decreases frustration for everyone involved, and it improves the success rates of the students.

Although this book is written for students who have little or no computer experience, those who have studied a computer language can benefit from the material. The book is intended for a one-semester introductory course for language or application majors. It can serve as the course textbook or as a supplement. For computer language majors, Units 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 should be emphasized; for application majors, Units 1, 2, 5 (Chapters 13 and 16 only), and 6.

The text provides a step-by-step progression, with detailed explanations and many illustrations, from the basics of mathematical functions and operators to the design and use of such techniques as codes, indicators, control-breaks, arrays, pointers, file updates, report handling, data structures, and object oriented programming. The tools of problem solving, including interactivity (structure) charts, IPO charts, algorithms, and flowcharts, are demonstrated and explained. Putting It All Together sectionsillustrate the complete solution for a given problem, using the concepts previously presented. In some cases, an earlier solution is updated to incorporate more sophisticated techniques. Throughout the text, problems presented for solution are typical of the business world and provide excellent experience for the students.

Organization

Unit One, Introduction to Problem Solving and Programming, presents basic concepts of problem solving, an introduction to how problems are solved on computers, and steps in analyzing a problem and designing an appropriate solution. Unit Two, Structuring Programs for Languages and Applications, examines how and when the various types of logic structures are appropriately used. Unit Three, Data Structures, includes the use of various data structures such as arrays, stacks, linked lists, and binary trees to access and process data. Sort methods and search methods are included in this unit. Unit Four, Object-Oriented Programming, includes elements of object-oriented programming and scripting. Unit Five, File Processing, includes file concepts, sequential-access file processing, and random-access file processing. Unit Six, Problem Solving for Application Software, concentrates on word processing, desktop publishing, graphics, spreadsheets, database management systems, and document processing. The appendices present formulas commonly used in business applications, sort and merge methods, ASCII and EBCDIC codes, blank forms that can be used in designing solutions, and other problem-solving tools.

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to those who reviewed the manuscript and offered suggestions and constructive comments. In particular, I thank

  • Ken Conway, Arapahoe Community College
  • Paula Strozier, Macon Technical Institute

In addition, I wish to thank Rand Ruggeberg, project editor at Custom Editorial Productions and Alex Wolf, production editor at Prentice Hall for their care and patience during the production process.

Table of Contents

I. INTRODUCTION TO PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING.

1. General Problem Solving Concepts.
2. Beginning Problem Solving Concepts for the Computer.
3. Programming Concepts.

Unit One: Supplementary Exercises.

II. STRUCTURING PROGRAMS FOR LANGUAGES AND APPLICATIONS.

4. An Introduction to Programming Structure.
5. Problem Solving with the Sequential Logic Structure.
6. Problem Solving with Decisions.
7. Problem Solving with Loops.
8. Problem Solving with the Case Logic Structure.

Unit Two: Supplementary Exercises.

III. DATA STRUCTURES.

9. Processing Arrays.
10. Data Structures.

Unit Three: Supplementary Exercises.

IV. OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING.

11. Concepts of Object-Oriented Programming.
12. Object-Oriented Program Design.

Unit Four: Supplementary Exercises.

V. FILE PROCESSING.

13. File Concepts.
14. Sequential-Access File Applications.
15. Sequential-Access File Updating.
16. Random-Access File Processing and Updating.

Unit Five: Supplementary Exercises.

VI. PROBLEM SOLVING FOR APPLICATION SOFTWARE.

17. Introduction to Application Software.
18.Problem Solving for Word Processing and Desktop Publishing.
19. Problem Solving for Spreadsheets.
20. Problem Solving for Relational Database Management Systems.
21. Document Processing.

Unit Six: Supplementary Exercises. Appendix A: Formulas Commonly Used in Business Applications.
Appendix B: Sort, Merge, and Search Methods.
Appendix C: ASCII and EBCDIC Codes for Data Representation.
Appendix D: Forms to use in Problem Solving.
Appendix E: Other Problem-Solving Tools.
Glossary.
Index

Preface

Preface

A knowledge of problem solving and programming concepts is a necessity for those who work with computers, either as programmers or as users. Unfortunately, many students have greater difficulty with problem solving than they do with the syntax of computer languages or applications. Since problem-solving concepts are similar in all languages and applications, students can learn them in one preliminary course. Then, when they move on to language and application courses, both the students and the instructor can concentrate on syntax. This arrangement not only saves time but also decreases frustration for everyone involved, and it improves the success rates of the students.

Although this book is written for students who have little or no computer experience, those who have studied a computer language can benefit from the material. The book is intended for a one-semester introductory course for language or application majors. It can serve as the course textbook or as a supplement. For computer language majors, Units 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 should be emphasized; for application majors, Units 1, 2, 5 (Chapters 13 and 16 only), and 6.

The text provides a step-by-step progression, with detailed explanations and many illustrations, from the basics of mathematical functions and operators to the design and use of such techniques as codes, indicators, control-breaks, arrays, pointers, file updates, report handling, data structures, and object oriented programming. The tools of problem solving, including interactivity (structure) charts, IPO charts, algorithms, and flowcharts, are demonstrated and explained. Putting It All Together sections illustrate thecomplete solution for a given problem, using the concepts previously presented. In some cases, an earlier solution is updated to incorporate more sophisticated techniques. Throughout the text, problems presented for solution are typical of the business world and provide excellent experience for the students.

Organization

Unit One, Introduction to Problem Solving and Programming, presents basic concepts of problem solving, an introduction to how problems are solved on computers, and steps in analyzing a problem and designing an appropriate solution. Unit Two, Structuring Programs for Languages and Applications, examines how and when the various types of logic structures are appropriately used. Unit Three, Data Structures, includes the use of various data structures such as arrays, stacks, linked lists, and binary trees to access and process data. Sort methods and search methods are included in this unit. Unit Four, Object-Oriented Programming, includes elements of object-oriented programming and scripting. Unit Five, File Processing, includes file concepts, sequential-access file processing, and random-access file processing. Unit Six, Problem Solving for Application Software, concentrates on word processing, desktop publishing, graphics, spreadsheets, database management systems, and document processing. The appendices present formulas commonly used in business applications, sort and merge methods, ASCII and EBCDIC codes, blank forms that can be used in designing solutions, and other problem-solving tools.

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to those who reviewed the manuscript and offered suggestions and constructive comments. In particular, I thank

  • Ken Conway, Arapahoe Community College
  • Paula Strozier, Macon Technical Institute

In addition, I wish to thank Rand Ruggeberg, project editor at Custom Editorial Productions and Alex Wolf, production editor at Prentice Hall for their care and patience during the production process.

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