Proprietary Records of South Carolina, Volume Three: Abstracts of the Records of the Surveyor General of the Province, Charles Towne 1678-1698

Proprietary Records of South Carolina, Volume Three: Abstracts of the Records of the Surveyor General of the Province, Charles Towne 1678-1698

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Overview


As early as 1677, lots were being laid out on Oyster Point, the site of present-day Charleston. By 1680, the town boasted about one hundred houses, a thriving port and the seat of government in Carolina. Its citizens included landed gentry, shopkeepers, indentured servants, slaves and boatloads of refugees seeking religious and political freedom. This is the story of the voyage of the "First Fleet" of colonists, the settlement of Charles Towne at Albemarle Point, the settlement of James Island and the move across the Ashley River to the present site of Charleston. This volume contains abstracts of the Charles Towne lot measurements made by the Surveyors General of the Province from 1678 to 1698. The names of settlers and their occupations are given, as well as descriptions of the houses, buildings and lots of the town. Histories of many of the first lots provide rich genealogical material about the early settlers. Previously unpublished maps of Charles Towne from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, as well as modern renditions, give a fresh interpretation of the colonial town and its growth. Transcribed, compiled and edited by two award-winning editors, Proprietary Records of South Carolina continues the standard of excellence set in the first two publications of this series.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781596294165
Publisher: History Press, The
Publication date: 11/30/2007
Series: Proprietary Records of South Carolina , #3
Pages: 190
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author


Susan Bates and Cheves Leland have over 50 years of research experience between them. Susan Bates' particular interests include marsh and land grant research as well as genealogical and historical interests. Cheves Leland's focus is on archives and historical documents. Both editors have done extensive research on the early settlers of Carolina, with special emphasis on the Huguenots who settled the area. This is their third publication together.

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Proprietary Records of South Carolina, Volume Three: Abstracts of the Records of the Surveyor General of the Province, Charles Towne 1678-1698 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
thornton37814 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Did you have ancestors in South Carolina before the end of the 17th century? If so, History Press has a three-volume work that is absolutely essential for researching the earliest period of the province that eventually became the eighth state admitted to the United States. Susan Baldwin Bates and Harriott Cheves Leland have painstakingly abstracted some of earliest land and estate records of the state.Volume three contains Abstracts of the Records of the Surveyor General of the Province, Charles Towne, 1678-1698. The introduction provides important information about the founding of Charleston, about the office responsible for these records,and about the records themselves. The records themselves consist chiefly of land warrants. There is a section of color plates illustrating records, plats, and maps found in the record group.The appendices consist of a list of the surveyors, histories of specific lots in Charleston, and the surveyor's notebook.There is a bibliography and an index of places and people.These three volumes are indispensable for those researching South Carolina's early history and for those researching the lives of early settlers of South Carolina. Researchers are fortunate that a publisher such as History Press is willing to publish volumes such as these which have a more limited audience to make them widely available for historians, genealogists, and other interested persons.Note: The three volumes were provided by the publisher for review.