Prudence (Custard Protocol Series #1)

Prudence (Custard Protocol Series #1)

by Gail Carriger

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Overview

Prudence (Custard Protocol Series #1) by Gail Carriger

Introducing the Custard Protocol series, in which Prudence travels to India for Queen, country...and the perfect pot of tea.

When Prudence Alessandra Maccon Akeldama ("Rue" to her friends) is bequeathed an unexpected dirigible, she does what any sensible female under similar circumstances would do — she christens it the Spotted Custard and floats off to India.

Soon, she stumbles upon a plot involving local dissidents, a kidnapped brigadier's wife, and some awfully familiar Scottish werewolves. Faced with a dire crisis (and an embarrassing lack of bloomers), Rue must rely on her good breeding — and her metanatural abilities — to get to the bottom of it all...

The Custard Protocol
Prudence
Imprudence

For more from Gail Carriger, check out:

The Parasol Protectorate
Soulless
Changeless
Blameless
Heartless
Timeless

Finishing School (YA)
Etiquette & Espionage
Curtsies & Conspiracies
Waistcoats & Weaponry
Manners & Mutiny

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316212243
Publisher: Orbit
Publication date: 03/17/2015
Series: Custard Protocol Series , #1
Pages: 368
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

New York Times bestselling author Gail Carriger writes to cope with being raised in obscurity by an expatriate Brit and an incurable curmudgeon. She escaped small town life and inadvertently acquired several degrees in Higher Learning. Ms. Carriger then traveled the historic cities of Europe, subsisting entirely on biscuits secreted in her handbag. She resides in the Colonies, surrounded by fantastic shoes, where she insists on tea imported from London.

The Parasol Protectorate books are: Soulless, Changeless, Blameless, Heartless, and Timeless. Soulless won the ALA's Alex Award. A manga adaptation released in Spring 2012 and a young adult series set in the same universe — the Finishing School series — launched in Spring 2013. Gail is soon to begin writing a new adult series, The Parasol Protectorate Abroad (2015).

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Prudence 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Carriger delivered with this spin-off and this twist on the next generation of adventures will be loved by anyone who loved the Parasol series. Pru is even more daring then her mother and Carriger weaves in the Maccon and Akeldama family bonds and loyalties wonderfully into the story. I can't wait for the next book.
Avid-readerKS More than 1 year ago
Gail Carriger delivers again. A wonderful steampunk frolic. I love the extension of characters from her previous books which can stand on their own.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this series better than the last group. I am a fan of givibg us a look at Pru.
dibbylodd More than 1 year ago
Gail Carriger continues to manage to combine humor, social conventions and the needling there of, great adventure and daring do, all with a delightfully strong (-willed) main character. Continuing the legacy of the Parasol Protectorate series and The Finishing School series, she has me thoroughly captivated, once again. Consider the challenges of a young woman who can change shape but needs clothing when changing back! And a young French man who thinks she is in need of rescuing, even when she is not. And a dirigible crew to lead. Exotic locations and "people". Well, the story has it all and then some!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Steampunk at its wittiest. Our favorite skin-stealer is now adventuring.
TheThoughtSpot 6 months ago
I received Prudence by Gail Carriger through a goodreads giveaway. Set in Victorian times and full of appropriate banter for the era, this story about Prudence is a steampunk adventure of exploration and humor. Prudence’s parentage causes some confusion at first, but then it’s explained that she’s a werewolf with a vampire mother and an adoptive vampire father and a werewolf birth father; I think I’ve got that right. Prudence (Rue) receives a dirigible and a mission to fly to India to procure tea, so she can be gainfully employed, become more independent and stay out of trouble due to boredom. Prudence takes a talented crew along for the job and gets more than any of them bargained for. A fun supernatural steampunk adventure, 4 stars! * I received this book as a goodreads giveaway and all opinions and thoughts are my own.
Anonymous 7 months ago
Little Rue is all grown up and following in her mother's footsteps plus tea! Yes tea is very important.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this world ?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful little book written with a whimsey, campy spirit. The characters are all memorable and two dimensional in the best way. A rollicking adventure with the flair the best victorian writers and the energy and pace of Jules Verne. All this plus frocks and and the perfect cup of tea.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love reading books by Gail. The story is great with all the twist and turns.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love the world Gail Carriger has crafted and I'm a fan of her characters in The Parasol Protectorate and the Finishing School series. So I'm a bit confused as to why Rue is not a compelling character that makes me want to keep reading. In this book, I am more interested in the tidbits about characters in the previous series. I've just started the next book and feel it gets more interesting. I chalk the first book up to character building.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Easy casual read
thereadingchick More than 1 year ago
Gail Carriger has created a world that is unlike any other writer. Her characters dress in Victorian steampunk style, travel in dirigibles, fight paranormal battles, while still adhering to social niceties and rules. Yes, tea is promptly at 4 o'clock with biscuits and such, and the correct etiquette is used while raising that teacup and dodging arrows simultaneously. Seriously, I don't mean to make light of this novel at all. The style of the characters meld completely with the storyline, that it all seems completely believable, in a rather fantastic way. Prue and her crew, travel to India on what they thought was a journey on behalf of Prue's adopted father, on a tea trade mission, but it is in fact a mission of a different nature. It is her first undercover spy mission, and she shows a natural inclination to figuring out the mystery, and pacifying all parties involved, all while remaining very ladylike. Or as ladylike as you can be when you are a preternatural being who with a touch turns into the paranormal being you've touched. If you have never read a book by Gail Carriger, I would start with the book Soulless in the Parasol Protectorate series, which is about Prudence's birth mother and father and really sets the stage for this world, and everyone in it. If you like Paranormal, then you will love these books, and Prudence, was also very enjoyable...Indeed!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good plot. Good characters. Good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ksprings More than 1 year ago
This review was first published on Kurt's Frontier. Synopsis: Prudence Alessandra Maccon Akeldama (Rue to her friends) is a socialite in the steampunk alternative universe of Victorian London. She is also something of a wellborn scamp. When she is given a dirigible as a surprise gift, she names it the Spotted Custard. She is then given a mission to pursue the perfect cup of tea. In India, she finds herself in the midst of a brewing crisis. Local dissidents have kidnapped the local army commander’s wife. Rue is far from helpless, however. She is a metanatural, able to steal other supernatural creatures powers. Risking the loss of her bloomers when she changes shape, she must solve the mystery of the brigadier’s wife and prevent a war. Review: The Custard Protocol is set in the same universe as the Parasol Protectorate series. (It should be noted that the reviewer is has yet to read the Parasol Protectorate series.) Prudence is a mortal protagonist in a world dominated by various immortal creatures such as vampires and werewolves. She possesses one advantage from being related to such beings by birth. She has a rare “metanatural” power. She can steal the powers from an immortal. Of course she may have to sacrifice whatever she’s wearing if she takes the powers of a were-creature, leaving her embarrassingly exposed. The first thing one must realize about this book is it is written “tongue-in-cheek.” The characters are stereotypical in their Victorian mannerisms. This leads to some amusing situations. The story is episodic instead of plotted. This weakens the story, but not terribly. The setup is long with the action taking place in the second half of the story. While not quite a page turner, the story is witty and fun to read.
Michelle_Palmer More than 1 year ago
A truly delightful steampunk book. I very much enjoyed the wonderful characterization as well as the amazing descriptions of the places and modes of travel. The plot moved along at a fast pace. I have not yet read the Parasol Protectorate, but I know that I now will. This book had me laughing out loud several times and scaring the heck out of my cat. A wonderful, enjoyable ride. The relationships felt very real to me and the chemistry between all of the various characters worked well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The younger generation from the Parasol Protectorate comes of age and carries on the adventurous ways in a style all their own
InvestedIvana More than 1 year ago
Main characters: Grown-up Prudence is exactly what I would expect after her introduction in the Parasol Protectorate. The product of three strong-willed parents, Prudence is smart, strategic, and independent but also rash and stubborn. She is afraid of very little and thrills at adventure. Her eagerness to try other shapes with her metanatural abilities, and her descriptions of being in those shapes, is so fun to read. Other characters: Prim, Percy, and Quesnel make excellent compatriots and friends. I particularly love Prim’s complete acceptance of Rue and the way she has skills Rue does not. The supporting cast onboard the Custard – Spoo, Aggie, and Percy’s valet, Virgil – make for some great interactions. Miss Sekhmet brings a smooth, mysterious vibe to the story that is quite a lot of fun. And the incorporation of the Featherstonehaughs is a nice nod to the first series. World: The world of the Parasol Protectorate gets a little larger as the Spotted Custard floats off to India to discover there are more supernatural creatures in the world than the Empire thought. We don’t get to explore the cultural differences between the Rakshasas and the British vampires much; that would have been interesting. I love the use of the British Imperialism attitude in the story. The British believed that bringing culture and civilization to the wilds of the world was a great gift and could not understand why India, the Scottish, or anyone else would object. Silly British. Story: “I think this is the one where there is a misunderstanding.” Rue is sent on a mission to India to manage a tea trade for her Dama. What she discovers is something altogether different. There are a few times during the standoff between the Vanaras, the werewolfs, and the British Army when it feels like Rue keeps making the wrong decisions – when it seems taking direct action would be more effective than the many stalling tactics and sly schemes she does employ. Both Miss Sekhmet and Rue have everyone’s attention many times, and I am confused why they don’t use it more effectively. I wonder if this is part of this new “New Adult” genre – getting in over your head, making the not-quite-right decision, but yet seeing it mostly work out in the end. I think it made the scene play out a little longer than necessary; but, as I say, it all worked out in the end. Narrator: Moira Quirk did a great job of voicing the characters. Fans of the Finishing School audios will be very happy. However, being the Type A personality that I am, and such a huge fan of Emily Gray’s performance on the Parasol Protectorate, I have to admit to a small bit of disappointment – particularly with the voice of Lord Akeldama. Gray just nailed the voice of Akeldama, expressing his outrageousness but also his deviousness and his heart. Quirk just didn’t have that same effect. Many of the pronunciations were different as well, such as BUR and Quesnel’s name. I know this is simply an expression of the human resistance to change – as I say, Moira Quirk did a great job. But I do think consistency matters a great deal to audiobook listeners. Overall: This was another fun story from Ms. Carriger, and another fun listen as well. I’m very much looking forward to the continuation of Rue’s story. Purchased. Review courtesy of onebooktwo.com | one book, two reviews.