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Psychotherapy Is Worth It: A Comprehensive Review of Its Cost-Effectiveness
     

Psychotherapy Is Worth It: A Comprehensive Review of Its Cost-Effectiveness

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by Susan G. Lazar, Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry
 

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In Psychotherapy Is Worth It: A Comprehensive Review of Its Cost-Effectiveness, edited by Susan G. Lazar, M.D., and co-authored with members of the Committee on Psychotherapy of the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, surveys the medical, psychiatric and psychological literature from 1984 to 2007 that is relevant to the cost-effectiveness of all kinds of

Overview

In Psychotherapy Is Worth It: A Comprehensive Review of Its Cost-Effectiveness, edited by Susan G. Lazar, M.D., and co-authored with members of the Committee on Psychotherapy of the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, surveys the medical, psychiatric and psychological literature from 1984 to 2007 that is relevant to the cost-effectiveness of all kinds of psychotherapy. The volume explores the cost of providing psychotherapy in relation to its impact both on health and on the costs to society of psychiatric illness and related conditions.

Written for psychotherapists, psychiatric benefit providers, policy makers, and others interested in the cost-effectiveness of providing psychotherapeutic treatments, this book analyzes the burden of mental illness, particularly in the United States, and the enormous associated costs to society that constitute a chronic, insufficiently recognized crisis in the health of our nation. The authors point out that in the United States nearly 30% of the population over the age of 18 has a diagnosable psychiatric disorder and yet only about 33% of those treated receive minimally adequate care. In fact, most people with mental disorders in the United States remain untreated or poorly treated, leading to loss in productivity, higher rates of absenteeism, increased costs, morbidity and mortality from medical illnesses, and loss of life through suicide.

This book provides a systematic and comprehensive review of 25 years of medical literature on the cost-effectiveness of psychotherapy and discusses the: • Epidemiology of mental illness, including prevalence and treatment rates• Misconceptions and stigmas associated with psychiatric illness and the provision of psychotherapy and how they affect those most in need of care • Cost-effectiveness of psychotherapy for the major psychiatric disorders as well as savings that psychotherapy can yield in increased health, work productivity, lives saved, and medical and hospital related costs

For instance, in a review of 18 studies conducted from 1984 to 1994, psychotherapy was found to be cost-effective in treating patients with severe disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and borderline personality disorder, and led to improved work functioning and decreased hospitalization. Likewise, studies point to the enhancement of outcomes when psychotherapy is used in conjunction with medical therapies in the treatment of cancer, heart disease, and other prevalent, chronic diseases. Psychotherapy Is Worth It: A Comprehensive Review of Its Cost-Effectiveness concludes that studies confirm psychotherapy works for many conditions, is cost-effective, and is not over-used by those persons not truly in need. A treatment that is cost-effective is not "cheap"; rather, it can provide effective medical help at a cost acceptable to society, in comparison both to other effective treatments for the same condition and to medical treatments for other classes of mental disorder.

Editorial Reviews

Doody Reviews
Reviewer: Heather Huang, MD (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This is a comprehensive review of the literature examining the cost-effectiveness of psychotherapy.
Purpose: By examining the aspects of psychotherapeutic interventions for major psychiatric diagnoses, the book aims to investigate their cost-effectiveness.
Audience: It is intended for psychotherapists, providers of psychiatric care, policy makers, and anyone else interested in the costs of providing psychotherapeutic treatments.
Features: A brief overview of the impact and prevalence of mental illness in society begins the book, with a discussion of the complexity of cost, providing a framework for understanding the multiple dimensions of cost and cost-effectiveness. Subsequent chapters summarize the literature as it pertains to the evaluation of cost-effectiveness of psychotherapy in various psychiatric diagnoses, including schizophrenia, borderline personality disorders, PTSD, anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse. Separate chapters address psychotherapy in patients with medical conditions, children, and adolescents, as well as the place of long-term and intensive psychotherapy. Several chapters use tables to summarize the important references.
Assessment: In an era of medicine dominated by cost considerations, emphasis on biologic treatments, and evidence-based medicine, psychotherapy has lost some centrality as a therapeutic treatment modality. This book comprehensively examines research literature that addresses cost-effectiveness of various psychotherapeutic modalities for a number of the most important psychiatric conditions. It touches upon the multiple ways that psychotherapy is used (supportive, educational, insight-oriented, behavioral, cognitive restructuring) for various illnesses. Through summarizing research literature of sound methodology, it overwhelmingly demonstrates the multiple ways that psychotherapy reduces healthcare costs (overall medical utilization, frequency of hospitalization, duration of hospital stay, and work days lost). Reviewing mostly positive studies, this book does not provide an in-depth summary of the negative or equivocal literature, although it does address equivocal studies in general.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Heather Huang, MD (University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health)
Description: This is a comprehensive review of the literature examining the cost-effectiveness of psychotherapy.
Purpose: By examining the aspects of psychotherapeutic interventions for major psychiatric diagnoses, the book aims to investigate their cost-effectiveness.
Audience: It is intended for psychotherapists, providers of psychiatric care, policy makers, and anyone else interested in the costs of providing psychotherapeutic treatments.
Features: A brief overview of the impact and prevalence of mental illness in society begins the book, with a discussion of the complexity of cost, providing a framework for understanding the multiple dimensions of cost and cost-effectiveness. Subsequent chapters summarize the literature as it pertains to the evaluation of cost-effectiveness of psychotherapy in various psychiatric diagnoses, including schizophrenia, borderline personality disorders, PTSD, anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse. Separate chapters address psychotherapy in patients with medical conditions, children, and adolescents, as well as the place of long-term and intensive psychotherapy. Several chapters use tables to summarize the important references.
Assessment: In an era of medicine dominated by cost considerations, emphasis on biologic treatments, and evidence-based medicine, psychotherapy has lost some centrality as a therapeutic treatment modality. This book comprehensively examines research literature that addresses cost-effectiveness of various psychotherapeutic modalities for a number of the most important psychiatric conditions. It touches upon the multiple ways that psychotherapy is used (supportive, educational, insight-oriented, behavioral, cognitive restructuring) for various illnesses. Through summarizing research literature of sound methodology, it overwhelmingly demonstrates the multiple ways that psychotherapy reduces healthcare costs (overall medical utilization, frequency of hospitalization, duration of hospital stay, and work days lost). Reviewing mostly positive studies, this book does not provide an in-depth summary of the negative or equivocal literature, although it does address equivocal studies in general.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780873182164
Publisher:
American Psychiatric Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
03/11/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
359
File size:
7 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are Saying About This

Robert J. Ursano

In this volume, Dr Lazar and her authors move us forward toward our goals of evidence based, cost effective, available and destigmatized psychotherapeutic care for our patients.

Meet the Author

Susan G. Lazar, M.D., is Past Chair of the Committee on Psychotherapy, Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry; Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Georgetown University School of Medicine, George Washington University School of Medicine, and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; and Supervising and Training Analyst at the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute.

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Psychotherapy Is Worth It: A Comprehensive Review of Its Cost-Effectiveness 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I notice you gave some helpful critscism on a story. Here's some for you. <br><br> 'The Gifted' seems like a fabulous story, but in reality, it's your normal teen realistic fiction with an obvious ending. Or not very eventful. It needs a splash, something to make it worth reading. On another story you gave helpful hints on, you claimed the words they chose weren't quite right, and also asked why a certain event happened. This can also be applied to your writing. I also feel as if you don't fully understand your characters emotions- put yourself in their shoes. Be realistic enough its NOT just an okay teen fiction book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
(Kk, IMK. I will put Ricky in this chapter. But he can't bring paintings to life. Instead, he is the best painter in the world. Hope that is cool with chu :3. And Frostbyte, my fav Pokemon is Mew and Charizard. I have a shiny Mew card and Charizard Lv. X card.) I sigh as I lean against the side of the school building, twirling my blond hair around my fingers boredly as I watch the other students. Today is Tuesday, the first odd day of the week. So it's Basketball day. Ugh. I would rather it be Track day. I am boss at running. <p> I was grinning at that thought when a boy with black hair came up, sweating and panting in his gym suit. His green eyes were tired. <p> "Zoey. You aren't going to play?", he asked. <p> I smile at my best friend. "No, Ricky. You know I would rather run. Anyways, I'm trying to think of what your next masterpiece should be." <p> He nods, his face a little dissapointed. "All right. I just don't want you getting in trouble again. I mean, c'mon. You're 18 and a senior, like me. You should know better." <p> I sighed. "I know. I know. Now, go on and play. I will meet you at lunch after class." He smiles, nodding and running off. <p> As he joins the class, I notice Sabrina, the school's Beauty Queen (otherwise known as Miss Most Popular), talking to Jake, the Mirster Most Popular. But, he wasn't listening. He had no interest in her. The whole school knew, even her. But she never gave up. <p> Jake saw me and grinned. "Hey! Zoey!" I looked up, almost choking, and pointed at myself. Me?, my face said clearly. <p> He walked up and smiled. Sabrina hmphed and stomped off. <p> Jake glanced at her retreating form and looked back at me. "Whew! Sorry, just had to get rid of her... um..." he tries to make small talk. I shrug like, I don't know what to say. He sighed. "Well, see ya." He walked back towards the field, grinning back at me. He was out of sight after a few seconds. <p> I slid down onto the grass. <p> What. Just. Happened?