Pudd'nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Pudd'nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

by Mark Twain, Darryl Pinckney
4.2 17

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Pudd'nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
MrZ More than 1 year ago
Pudd'nhead Wilson is one of Twain's finest and most under-rated novels. It shows all of Twain's disdain for slavery and racial inequality in his beloved South.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was so great. At certain moments it made you sad and at others you laughed. And the ending was practically perfect. The characters fit the book well and represented the setting perfectly. STRONLY RECOMEND YOU READ THIS BOOK!
Guest More than 1 year ago
While clearly not up to the standards of Tom Sawyer or Huck Finn, people have overlooked this Twain book for too many years. It has some excellent elements in it. I'll leave it up to the reader to decide whether it's about nature vs. nurture or not. Pudd'nhead Wilson's Calendar is a gem you'll want to retain some of those quotations forever.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is from some of Twain's autobiographical writings.
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Sanders More than 1 year ago
Pudd'nhead Wilson is a very interesting read that shows the reader the impact of slavery and rank in society. The characters in this story are structured well and give the story a realistic 19th century feel, including Twain's common "Jim" talk. One of the many things I enjoyed in this book was that every character seems to be as important as the rest; specific chapters are devoted to different characters and their perspective of the story. This story is hilarious and also very serious at times, and is to the par of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer. It saddens me to see that only 3 others have reviewed this book because it is such a great book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago