Puppermaster: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover

Puppermaster: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover

by Richard Hack

Hardcover

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781893224872
Publisher: New Millennium Entertainment
Publication date: 04/12/2004
Pages: 448
Product dimensions: 5.78(w) x 9.62(h) x 1.25(d)

Table of Contents

Prologue: Death of an Icon1
Chapter 1To Be Good is Not Enough, When You Dream of Greater Things27
Chapter 2Alien Threat51
Chapter 3Sex, Lies, and the Fbi75
Chapter 4The Electric Wire101
Chapter 5Crimes of the Century129
Chapter 6Hooray for Hollywood159
Chapter 7Ascent of Power185
Chapter 8A Foundation Built on Sand215
Chapter 9Roses are also Red245
Chapter 10A Pansy Is Only a Flower269
Chapter 11Civil Rights, Civil Wrongs299
Chapter 12Mobsters and Murders327
Chapter 13The Emperor Has No Clothes357
Epilogue: The Legacy, the Legend397
Appendix408
Acknowledgments413
Notes415
Bibliography425
Index431

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Puppermaster 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
broughtonhouse on LibraryThing 5 months ago
In some ways this is an annoying book. Potentially a fascinating story, the author keeps intruding into it with some truly awful pieces of writing - for instance on discovery "by the hired help of Hoover's body: "Crawford raced from the room,...his fluttering heart threatening to fly from his chest and across the room". J. Edgar Hoover, love or hate him, was one of the important figures of the 20th century. Hopefully his life and times will encourage a further look by an author who can let the story stand on its own behalf.
bcquinnsmom on LibraryThing 5 months ago
I would love to have rated this book higher, since J Edgar Hoover, past director of the FBI, is one of my favorite all time bad guys to read about. However, the author's writing reminded me of a graduate student putting together a thesis or paper -- either way too much detail about meaningless stuff (like the contents of various meals, including his last, or what he wore, or description of the day -- e.g. "the snow was coming down in flakes as big as blueberries" etc etc etc) and not enough depth into what I would consider the meat of the story. Every time Hack would get going on the FBI's involvement into this or that (and his wording would promise that you were really going to find out something incredible), he seemed to stray toward another tangent and I would be left wondering where the promised juicy tidbit went. But aside from those problems, the book was interesting, and I learned a lot of good ole J.Edgar that I had not known before. brief synopsisPuppetmaster examines both career and personal life (and rumors involving his personal life) of J. Edgar Hoover. By the time Hoover died, he was 77, and had been in office over 50 years and had served something like 8 presidents. While Hoover felt that he was doing his best to eradicate such evils as Communism and insurgency within the borders of the US, he was a man whose personal beliefs were rigid and did not evolve with the changing needs of the country. He was overly impressed with himself; no one could cross Hoover without finding the contents of his or her secret file being released to the public in some form or other. He built his reputation by conducting illegal activities and gathering intelligence on anyone he considered to be even remotely a threat either to the US or to the FBI (as in reputation), and authorized the use of "black bag jobs" such as illegal eavesdropping to build up his files. The man was a one man power base and had everyone afraid of him. He was often identified as the head of the American "gestapo" or "nkvd" and this description wasn't too far off the mark. Hoover is a fascinating study. I do recommend this book with the caveat that it is told simplistically so if you are looking for something rather more in depth, you won't like it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Richard Hack¿s book, ¿Puppetmaster: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover¿, is well documented, concise, and well presented, but I had to ask myself ¿where¿s the beef¿. There is simply nothing new in this biography of America¿s number one policeman. The book is 407 pages long. I read to page 357 and finally had to lay it down for keeps. There is simply nothing new. The book is well suited for individuals that have very little to no knowledge of the life of J. Edgar Hoover. I must admit that I was surprised by what I did not find in this volume on Hoover¿s life. J. Edgar Hoover has always been referred to as the keeper of secrets. You would think that with so many secrets, Richard Hack would have uncovered new, never-presented material, but he didn¿t. One day some of Hoover¿s most well kept secrets will be uncovered and a new book will share this discovery with willing readers like myself who want to know. But until then there are no discoveries to be found in ¿Puppetmaster: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover¿.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Richard Hack¿s book, ¿Puppetmaster: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover¿, is well documented, concise, and well presented, but I had to ask myself ¿where¿s the beef¿. There is simply nothing new in this biography of America¿s number one policeman. The book is 407 pages long. I read to page 357 and finally had to lay it down for keeps. There is simply nothing new. The book is well suited for individuals that have very little to no knowledge of the life of J. Edgar Hoover. I must admit that I was surprised by what I did not find in this volume on Hoover¿s life. J. Edgar Hoover has always been referred to as the keeper of secrets. You would think that with so many secrets, Richard Hack would have uncovered new, never-presented material, but he didn¿t. One day some of Hoover¿s most well kept secrets will be uncovered and a new book will share this discovery with willing readers like myself who want to know. But until then there are no discoveries to be found in ¿Puppetmaster: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover¿.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This insightful biography of the man who created the FBI is vital reading for Americans concerned about intelligence gathering and national security law enforcement. J.Edgar Hoover is revealed as a bureaucrat crazed with maintaining his personal power while working against a real and imagined 'evil empire.' He is shown as an administrator who would employ any means to claim an all-American Hallmark result. Hack reflects detailed research one would expect of a top-notch special agent and the skills of a writer who can weave bureauracy into drama. Hack respects readers by presenting facts and allowing readers to draw their own conclusions. Extensive notes and a detailed index round out this package.