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Puppeteer
     

Puppeteer

5.0 3
by Ian J Miller
 

In a future when resource shortages, terrorism, climate change and debt are crippling world economies, and where crime and corruption are the growth industries, someone is giving terrorists technology to bring down stealth bombers and turn drones and cruise missiles against their users. General Ramirez devises a plan to locate the source of this technology leak by

Overview

In a future when resource shortages, terrorism, climate change and debt are crippling world economies, and where crime and corruption are the growth industries, someone is giving terrorists technology to bring down stealth bombers and turn drones and cruise missiles against their users. General Ramirez devises a plan to locate the source of this technology leak by ordering Lt Colonel John Maxwell to pretend to be a rogue soldier gone terrorist.

Meanwhile, after rescuing a young mother and child from terror-thieves and then receiving a minor flesh wound from a sniper, Garry Sutherland is invited to join Carole Laborde to carry out undersea exploration at Kerguelen. What Garry does not understand is why a sniper who can hit a small section of half-inch pipe gave him only a minor wound, and why shortly after three new submersibles had to be built the three old nuclear-powered submersibles were stolen.

Maxwell begins to suspect that something much deeper is being played out, in which some unknown person is manoeuvring both government forces and terrorists for some unknown purpose. Critical to that purpose are the two young scientists carrying out a search for undersea mineral deposits at Kerguelen. Maxwell must protect a young woman who is supposed to be a burglar from terrorists, avoid being killed by terrorists, avoid soldiers sent by Ramirez to kill his alter ego, deal with a corrupt immediate commanding officer and uncover this unknown person. When he does, he is faced with one of the most difficult decisions of his life.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940011435720
Publisher:
Ian J Miller
Publication date:
06/27/2011
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
427 KB

Meet the Author

Ian J Miller was born 7th August 1942 to the son of a policeman sent to Hokitika (New Zealand) to fill vacancies due to the mass murderer Stanley Graham. Secondary education was at Ashburton High School, thence to University of Canterbury (BSc Hons1, PhD), followed by post-docs at Calgary, Southampton and Armidale. I returned to New Zealand to Chemistry Division, DSIR, to work first on lignin chemistry, then recycling, seaweed research, then hydrothermal wood liquefaction. In 1986 I left DSIR to set up Carina Chemical Laboratories Ltd, to carry out research to support the private half of a joint venture to make pyromellitates, the basis of high temperature resistant plastics. (When called to a TV program to discuss the danger of foam plastics in fires, I aimed a gas torch at the palm of my hand, protected only by a piece of foam plastic I had made shortly before. Fortunately, it worked, it glowed yellow hot, but held the heat for about half a minute.) This venture, and an associated seaweed processing venture collapsed during the late 1980s financial crisis, mostly for financial reasons. Current projects include the development of Nemidon gels (www.nemidon.co.nz/) and fuels and chemicals through the hydrothermal treatment of microalgae (www.aquaflowgroup.com/). I have written about 100 peer-reviewed scientific papers, about 35 other articles, and I was on the Editorial Board of Botanica Marina between about 1998-2008. In my first year University, following an argument with some Arts students, I was challenged to write a fictional book. I did in spare time: Gemina. I subsequently self-published a revised version, only to find publicity was forbidden as a condition of getting my finance for the pyromellitates project. Since then, I have written a few more science in fiction thriller-type novels that don't fit nicely in any category. These form a "future history", and Puppeteer is the first of one entry point.

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Puppeteer 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
charlie75 More than 1 year ago
Review of Puppeteer By Ian Miller If you like a masterful thriller of global proportions you will love Puppeteer. Set in the not too distant future where oil is at a premium and terrorism is at an all time high, this book will take you on a fast-paced ride around the world. Not only is Mr. Miller scientifically specific, his knowledge of global politics and the hierarchy of the Military, is spot on. In their efforts to claw their way to the top of the heap and garner military honors, two traitorous Colonels embark on a mission to create their own terrorist group. The unfortunate leader of this group, who goes by the name of John Carpenter, suddenly becomes the target of both the Military and the Terrorists. Again, Mr. Miller’s knowledge of geography and current scientific methods comes into play and I soon found myself on the edge of my seat, unable to put the book down. The actual Puppeteer, whose expertise includes computer science, physics and chemistry, mixed with a desire to teach the world a lesson, is a fanatic of gigantic proportions and is prepared to go to any length to fulfill that goal. He has nothing to lose. John’s complicated relationship with Tamsyn adds intrigue, and the quiet romance between Carole and Garry contributes to the human interest component of this fabulous novel. If you like an exciting read this one is for you. Review by Mary Firmin, author of Deadly Pleasures.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Puppeteer By Ian Miller. Intense, riveting, thrilling, suspense — this novel is all those and one fascinating, complex mystery as well! Brilliantly conceived and superbly written, this novel will keep you guessing, figuring, wondering, and reading until the surprising ending. Ian combines tight action sequences with both suspense and an shroud of mystery. The author’s book description is dead on: “When resource shortages, debt and terrorism threaten to bring anarchy to the world, one man sent on a mission to thwart hi-tech terrorism must find whoever is manipulating both terrorists and antiterrorist forces to bring down governance. When he unravels the plot, his sense of honor is severely tested, but only unimpeachable honor can succeed.” In my opinion, this is an understatement! When one looks at our own world situation today — with corrupt officials, with a global economy going bust propped up by newly printed money without any backing, with countries, states, and large cities spending far beyond their incomes, with greedy corporations looking only for profits, with barely one percent of the population holding nearly all the wealth and the rest struggling to get by, where the corporations and wealthy fund so many politicians, where global warming and dependency on fossil fuels never see workable, effective solutions — you can see how easily our world could become that in Ian’s novel. I was immediately stricken with just how his vision of a possible future could become our reality! I began by saying this novel is a fascinating, complex mystery. It is that and more. I like a good mystery, but this one kept me contemplating guessing, and figuring chapter after chapter, as more clues were revealed — very well done! Careful, once you start reading this one, you are not going to want to stop until the end, so don’t start reading it at bedtime. Ian’s writing is excellent. He’s found a perfect balance between action, suspense, mystery, and character development. I couldn’t help but notice that he’s from one of those “down under” countries, and I did have to look up a couple of words and learned that a “ute” is their word for a pick-up truck. While the action takes place in various countries around the world, a key location is the island group Les Îles Kerguelen, which I promptly had to look up on Google maps. So yes, I picked up a bit of geography as well as some unfamiliar words, all to the author’s credit, challenging me. Well done, Ian. Ian left me with a heavy question to ponder: is this evil terrorist really a terrorist? The only criticism I have of the novel is its ending. I’m not sure that that outcome could really happen and that it would solve the societal problems, but that’s my opinion. What’s yours? In short, I give Puppeteer, by Ian Miller a five-star rating and look forward to reading the sequels. He’s earned the rating!
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Paul Johnson for Readers' Favorite In the not too distant future the world is plagued with resources shortage, terrorism, climate change and debt which are crippling world economies. Crime and corruption are the new norm. Things get steadily worse when someone starts giving terrorists technology to bring down stealth bombers and turn drones and cruise missiles against their users. Army General Ramirez, in a desperate attempt to save his career, devises a plan to locate the source of this technology leak by ordering Lt Colonel John Maxwell to pretend to be a rogue soldier named John Carpenter in the hope of getting inside the terrorist organization. Maxwell begins to suspect that something much worse is going on as some unknown person seems to have the ability of manipulating both government forces and terrorists. Additionally, how do two young scientists carrying out a search for undersea mineral deposits on Kerguelen have to play in all of this? And, just what are the plans for the stolen submersibles? Along the way, Maxwell must protect a young woman who is assigned to his team. He must also avoid being killed by terrorists, as well as deal with a corrupt superior officer while attempting to uncover this unknown person. A tall order for sure. "Puppeteer" is a very well-written thriller. I particularly liked the futuristic setting. The author has woven a well thought-out story with the idea that this could really be the future. The characters, both good and bad, are first rate. The reader will quickly learn to like the good guys and dislike the corrupt bad guys. The dialogue is spot on with the military and computer age technology. The author has developed a large book with two very good plots going on simultaneously that climax together nicely in the end. Very well done.