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Quarry's Vote (Quarry Series #5)
     

Quarry's Vote (Quarry Series #5)

5.0 2
by Max Allan Collins
 

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When retired hitman Quarry turns down a million bucks to murder a presidential candidate, he becomes a "loose end" that the conspirators need to tie off. With his peaceful life in ruins, Quarry launches his own campaign--for vengeance. A new edition, with afterword by the author, of the fifth book in Max Allan Collins's cult classic series. They

Overview

When retired hitman Quarry turns down a million bucks to murder a presidential candidate, he becomes a "loose end" that the conspirators need to tie off. With his peaceful life in ruins, Quarry launches his own campaign--for vengeance. A new edition, with afterword by the author, of the fifth book in Max Allan Collins's cult classic series. They don't come harder-boiled than Quarry. "Violent and volatile and packed with sexuality . . . classic pulp fiction" (USA Today).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781935797050
Publisher:
Perfect Crime Books
Publication date:
11/01/2010
Series:
Quarry Series , #5
Pages:
216
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.49(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Max Allan Collins, noted both for his Nate Heller detective series and as creator of Road to Perdition (basis for the Oscar-winning Tom Hanks film), has been writing about killer-for-hire Quarry for more than thirty years. Says Booklist: "Collins remains the quintessential modern-day pulp writer."

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Quarry's Vote 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
gloriafeit 10 months ago
From the publisher: Now retired and happily married, Quarry turns down a million-dollar contract to assassinate a presidential candidate. It’s not the sort of assignment you can just walk away from without consequences - - but coming after Quarry has consequences, too. The longest-running series from Max Allan Collins, author of “Road to Perdition” and the first ever to feature a hitman as the main character, the Quarry novels tell the story of a paid assassin with a rebellious streak and an unlikely taste for justice. Once a Marine sniper, Quarry found a new home stateside with a group of contract killers. But some men aren’t made for taking orders - - and when Quarry strikes off, on his own, God help the man on the other side of his nine-millimeter. Quarry, who thinks of himself as a Vietnam-era relic, looks at himself at this stage of his life thusly: “I was thirty-five. I was getting bored with one-night stands and my own microwave cooking, I wanted some company and she seemed pleasant enough. She talked too much, but most people do. She was beautiful, a terrific cook, and she kept out of my way. What more could I ask?” He’s been retired for nearly ten years, having used the name “Quarry” during those years when he was a paid assassin. Written in 1987, the book at times seems prescient: “We are coming into a fascinating election year. The two parties - - depending upon whom they choose as their standard bearers of course - - should be in for a real battle. Think of it: the highest office in the land up for grabs…we could have a true conservative in the White House . . .” He turns down the offer, despite the big bucks involved. And the situation leaves him deeply unsettled, threatening the life he has come to love, as people such as the ones making this offer don’t like to leave any loose ends. Thinking of his wife, he muses “She was a sweet kid. I didn’t deserve her, but then who does deserve what they get in this life, good or bad?” The ensuing tale of killers chasing a killer, who is in turn chasing them, is wonderfully well written. A target is described as a “wealthy paranoid political crackpot who thinks the Soviets are after him.” When Quarry is asked “Are you a detective or an assassin,” he responds “Necessity has turned me into a little of both.” When Quarry enters an upper-middle-class residence, he thinks: “It was the home of somebody who used to bowl but now golfs.” His writing has been called “classic pulp fiction,” but my own take on it is that it is as enjoyable as anything being written contemporaneously. Highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Raven and raven
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Alexis and erza