The Quiet American: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

The Quiet American: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

Paperback(Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

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The Quiet American 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i read this book without expecting to be pulled into the book. the narrative slowly won me over and i found myself in the middle of rice fields with the characters of the book! i feel as though i were in vietnam, walking the streets, sitting in the restaurants, having a drink with fowler and pyle. more than anything i feel as though i had entered into the mind of fowler and experienced what he was experiencing. this book transported me to another world, another time and another life. i highly recommend this book. it's not a fast paced book but one worth reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Difficult to read due to lack of hyphons and words running into the next paragraph. Better off buying the hard cover book.
Tom Pearson More than 1 year ago
Great novel, terrible edition. Due to sloppy formatting, words are broken routinely at the ends of line making the novel a chore to read. Graham Greene deserves better as do B&N's customers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One hopes that the excellent movie (and Michael Caine's well-publicized efforts to get it released after the studio went week in the knees) will bring a wave of new readers to Graham Greene -- one of the greatest novelists of his generation. A former spy who never managed to curb his wanderlust, Greene has set his novels in every corner of the world, favoring authenticity and characterization over trite blockbuster action. For anyone interested in literary craftsmanship and/or international affairs, his books are indispensable. The Quiet American, one of his stronger efforts, is a good place to start -- but not to stop.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's not just the story, but how Graham Greene weaves his words. The story is masterfully told; the characters are shaped with care. It's simply one of the greatest stories I've read, on the same level of James Hilton's Lost Horizon in the realms of storytelling. The plot is superbly crafted and Greene makes it so you really care what happens despite the character's flaws; a skill which many contemporary authors seem to lack.
Anonymous 5 months ago
I asked for a refund. The book is not formatted properly and so words end at the end of a live and continue onto the next line with no regard for any rules of syllabification or punctuation. It's a shame; Greene is a wonderful story-teller.
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Jon_B More than 1 year ago
A classic and for good reason, the novel tells one perspective of the story of the beginnings of American involvement in Vietnam prior to what is now referred to as the Vietnam War, during the 1950's when it was still a French colony. Fowler is a well crafted character, as is Pyle to a lesser extent, though I agree with many critics that Phuong's character is too childish and simplistic and Greene perpetrates the same degree of "othering" that many of his peers do in this kind of writing. Still, it's a well told story, there's a great sense of tension and sense of place, and a good starting point for looking at this not-told-nearly-enough story of the US/Vietnam relationship.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Greene's novel was meant to shock and offend. He novelized the terrifying consequences of American geopolitical innocence. it should be read by intelligent and open minded people, and not the weak minded who see things only on one dimension.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is so hard hitting on the idealism of the American's during the French war in Vietnam (1950-'54). It gives you a look at the Vietnamese people and their country. The book is all about the outsiders view of the people and the politics Vietnam. In war your have to pick a side to stay human.