Quotable Austen

Quotable Austen

by Max Morris

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Overview


It may be possible to do without dancing entirely. Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively, without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind. —Emma

"I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry."  —Elizabeth Bennet to Fitzwilliam Darcy, Pride and Prejudice

"The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid."  —Henry Tilney, Northanger Abbey


Full of sense and sensibility, this collection is sure to delight all lovers of this great writer's uniquely humorous and perceptive style.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781849535823
Publisher: Summersdale
Publication date: 11/01/2015
Series: Quotable Series
Pages: 160
Product dimensions: 3.90(w) x 5.20(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author


Max Morris is the author of Quotable Dickens.

Read an Excerpt

Quotable Austen


By Max Morris

Summersdale Publishers Ltd

Copyright © 2014 Summersdale Publishers Ltd
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-78372-144-3



CHAPTER 1

Matters of the Heart

* * *

'You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.' Fitzwilliam Darcy to Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'What a strange thing love is!' Emma Woodhouse, Emma

* * *

It requires uncommon steadiness of reason to resist the attraction of being called the most charming girl in the world. Northanger Abbey

* * *

'I have come to feel for you a passionate admiration and regard, which despite all my struggles, has overcome every rational objection.' Fitzwilliam Darcy to Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'You really have done your hair in a more heavenly style than ever; you mischievous creature, do you want to attract everybody? I assure you, my brother is quite in love with you already.' Isabella Thorpe to Catherine Morland, Northanger Abbey

* * *

'I suppose there may be a hundred different ways of being in love.' Emma Woodhouse, Emma

* * *

The happiness ... was such as he had probably never felt before; and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do. On Fitzwilliam Darcy, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

What could be more encouraging to a man who had her love in view? On Fanny Price, Mansfield Park

* * *

'It is such a happiness when good people get together – and they always do.' Miss Bates, Emma

* * *

'It is settled between us already, that we are to be the happiest couple in the world.' Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older ... Persuasion

* * *

The very first moment I beheld him, my heart was irrevocably gone. Love and Freindship

* * *

'I think you are in a very great danger of making him as much in love with you as ever.' Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

He perfectly agreed with her ... Emma felt herself so well acquainted with him, that she could hardly believe it to be only their second meeting. Emma

* * *

'I am really delighted with him; he is full as handsome ... and with such open, good-humoured countenance that one cannot help loving him at first sight.' Alicia Johnson on Mr De Courcy, Lady Susan

* * *

'That is the only kind of love I would give a farthing for – There is some sense in being in love at first sight.' Laura, Love and Freindship

* * *

'Warmth and tenderness of heart, with an affectionate, open manner, will beat all the cleverness of head in the world, for attraction: I am sure it will.' Emma Woodhouse, Emma

* * *

When he was present she had no eyes for anyone else. Everything he did was right. Everything he said was clever. On John Willoughby and Marianne Dashwood, Sense and Sensibility

* * *

'You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope ... I have loved none but you.' Captain Frederick Wentworth to Anne Elliot, Persuasion

* * *

'At his own ball he offended two or three young ladies, by not asking them to dance; and I spoke to him twice myself, without receiving an answer. Could there be finer symptoms? Is not general incivility the very essence of love?' Elizabeth Bennet on Mr Bingley, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'I never in my life saw a man more intent on being agreeable than Mr Elton ... With men he can be rational and unaffected, but when he has ladies to please, every feature works.' John Knightley, Emma

CHAPTER 2

Love's Disappointments

* * *

Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love. Northanger Abbey

* * *

Nothing can compare to the misery of being bound to one, and preferring another. Letter to Fanny Knight

* * *

There certainly are not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women to deserve them. Mansfield Park

* * *

There was one gentleman ... a very good-looking young man, who, I was told, wanted very much to be introduced to me, but as he did not want it quite enough to take much trouble in effecting it, we never could bring it about. Letter to Cassandra

* * *

You will in the course of the next two or three years meet with somebody more generally unexceptionable than anyone you have yet known, who will love you as warmly as possible, and who will so completely attract you that you will feel you never really loved before. Letter to Fanny Knight

* * *

'That would be the greatest misfortune of all! – To find a man agreeable whom one is determined to hate!' Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

No young lady can be justified in falling in love before the gentleman's love is declared, it must be very improper that a lady should dream of a gentleman before the gentleman is first known to have dreamt of her. Northanger Abbey

* * *

'I must therefore conclude that you are not serious in your rejection of me, I shall choose to attribute it to your wish of increasing my love by suspense, according to the usual practice of elegant females.' William Collins, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'Man is more robust than woman, but he is not longer lived; which exactly explains my view of the nature of their attachments.' Anne Elliot, Persuasion

* * *

'The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!' Marianne Dashwood, Sense and Sensibility

* * *

With such a husband, her misery was considered certain. On Mr Wickham and Lydia Bennet, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'There is safety in reserve, but no attraction. One cannot love a reserved person.' Frank Churchill, Emma

* * *

It would be mortifying to the feelings of many ladies, could they be made to understand how little the heart of man is affected by what is costly or new in their attire. Northanger Abbey

* * *

'I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.' Elizabeth Bennet to Fitzwilliam Darcy, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison, no countenances so beloved. Now they were as strangers; nay, worse than strangers, for they could never become acquainted. It was a perpetual estrangement. On Captain Frederick Wentworth and Anne Elliot, Persuasion

* * *

'The course of true love never did run smooth – A Hartfield edition of Shakespeare would have a long note on that passage.' Emma Woodhouse, Emma

CHAPTER 3

Health and Happiness

* * *

'But then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere.' Mrs Grant, Mansfield Park

* * *

I bought some Japan ink ... and next week shall begin my operations on my hat, on which you know my principal hopes of happiness depend. Letter to Cassandra

* * *

Elizabeth continued her walk alone, crossing field after field at a quick pace, jumping over stiles and springing over puddles ... finding herself at last within view of the house, with weary ankles, dirty stockings, and a face glowing with the warmth of exercise. Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'I am very sorry to hear, Miss Fairfax, of your being out this morning in the rain. Young ladies should take care of themselves. Young ladies are delicate plants. They should take care of their health and their complexion.' Mr Woodhouse, Emma

* * *

Had not Elinor, in the sad countenance of her sister, seen a check to all mirth, she could have been entertained by Mrs Jennings's endeavours to cure a disappointment in love, by a variety of sweetmeats and olives, and a good fire. Sense and Sensibility

* * *

I continue quite well; in proof of which I have bathed again this morning. It was absolutely necessary that I should have the little fever and indisposition which I had: it has been all the fashion this week in Lyme. Letter to Cassandra

* * *

A general spirit of ease and enjoyment seemed diffused, and they all stood about and talked and laughed, and every moment had its pleasure and its hope. Mansfield Park

* * *

'Miss Eliza Bennet, let me persuade you to follow my example, and take a turn about the room. I assure you it is very refreshing after sitting so long in one attitude.' Miss Bingley, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

One fatal swoon has cost me my Life ... Beware of swoons ... Love and Freindship

* * *

'But now you love a hyacinth. So much the better. You have gained a new source of enjoyment, and it is well to have as many holds upon happiness as possible.' Henry Tilney, Northanger Abbey

* * *

'You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion for my poor nerves.' 'You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these last twenty years at least.' Mrs and Mr Bennet, Pride and Prejudice

CHAPTER 4

Good Manners

* * *

'We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.' Fanny Price, Mansfield Park

* * *

I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal. Letter to Cassandra

* * *

'Mr Wickham is blessed with such happy manners as may ensure his making friends – whether he may be equally capable of retaining them, is less certain.' Fitzwilliam Darcy, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'I have a great opinion of her. Whenever I see her, she always curtseys and asks me how I do, in a very pretty manner.' Mr Woodhouse on Hannah the housemaid, Emma

* * *

She had a cultivated mind, and was, generally speaking, rational and consistent; but she had prejudices on the side of ancestry; she had a value for rank and consequence, which blinded her a little to the faults of those who possessed them. On Lady Russell, Persuasion

* * *

'He is just what a young man ought to be,' said she, 'sensible, good-humoured, lively; and I never saw such happy manners! – so much ease, with such perfect good breeding!' Jane Bennet on Mr Bingley, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

He was not an ill-disposed young man, unless to be rather cold-hearted and rather selfish is to be ill-disposed: but he was, in general, well respected; for he conducted himself with propriety in the discharge of his ordinary duties. On John Dashwood, Sense and Sensibility

CHAPTER 5

The Arts

* * *

'What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all. I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.' Sir William Lucas, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

It was a splendid sight, and she began, for the first time that evening, to feel herself at a ball. On Catherine Morland, Northanger Abbey

* * *

Nothing could be more delightful! To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love. Pride and Prejudice

* * *

There were twenty dances, and I danced them all, and without any fatigue. Letter to Cassandra

* * *

'I am much mistaken if there are not some among us to whom a ball would be rather a punishment than a pleasure.' Caroline Bingley, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'But ... to be quite honest, I do not think I can live without something of a musical society. I condition for nothing else, but without music, life would be a blank to me.' Emma Woodhouse, Emma

* * *

'I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book!' Miss Bingley, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

Because they were fond of reading, she fancied them satirical: perhaps without exactly knowing what it was to be satirical; but that did not signify. Lady Middleton's opinion of Elinor and Marianne Dashwood, Sense and Sensibility

* * *

'There is a fine old saying, which everybody here is of course familiar with: "Keep your breath to cool your porridge"; and I shall keep mine to swell my song.' Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

The truth was that Sir Edward, whom circumstances had confined very much to one spot, had read more sentimental novels than agreed with him. Sanditon

* * *

'The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.' Henry Tilney, Northanger Abbey

* * *

'I must have my share in the conversation if you are speaking of music. There are few people in England, I suppose, who have more true enjoyment of music than myself, or a better natural taste.' Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'But it would have broke MY heart, had I loved him, to hear him read with so little sensibility.' Marianne Dashwood on Edward Ferrars, Sense and Sensibility

* * *

I could not sit seriously down to write a serious romance under any other motive than to save my life. Letter to James Stanier Clarke

* * *

Provided that nothing like useful knowledge could be gained from them, provided they were all story and no reflection, she had never any objection to books at all. On Catherine Morland, Northanger Abbey

* * *

'And books! – Thomson, Cowper, Scott ... she would buy up every copy, I believe, to prevent their falling into unworthy hands; and she would have every book that tells her how to admire an old twisted tree. Should not you, Marianne?' Edward Ferrars, Sense and Sensibility

* * *

'Oh! I am delighted with the book! I should like to spend my whole life in reading it.' Catherine Morland, Northanger Abbey

CHAPTER 6

Conversation

* * *

'I certainly have not the talent which some people possess,' said Darcy, 'of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.' Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'My idea of good company, Mr Elliot, is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.' 'You are mistaken,' said he gently, 'that is not good company, that is the best.' Anne and Mr Elliot, Persuasion

* * *

She was in gay spirits, and would have prolonged the conversation, wanting to hear the particulars of his suspicions, every look described, and all the wheres and hows of a circumstance which highly entertained her: but his gaiety did not meet hers. On Emma Woodhouse and Mr Knightley, Emma

* * *

Mrs Allen was ... never satisfied with the day unless she spent the chief of it by the side of Mrs Thorpe, in what they called conversation, but in which there was scarcely ever any exchange of opinion, and not often any resemblance of subject. Northanger Abbey

* * *

'for the advantage of SOME, conversation ought to be so arranged as that they may have the trouble of saying as little as possible.' Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice

* * *

'My idea of him is, that he can adapt his conversation to the taste of every body, and has the power as well as the wish of being universally agreeable.' Emma Woodhouse on Frank Churchill, Emma

* * *

I have subdued him entirely by sentiment and serious conversation, and made him, I may venture to say, at least half in love with me, without the semblance of the most commonplace flirtation. Lady Susan

* * *

Marianne was silent; it was impossible for her to say what she did not feel, however trivial the occasion; and upon Elinor therefore the whole task of telling lies when politeness required it, always fell. Sense and Sensibility

* * *

Their conversation turned upon those subjects, of which the free discussion has generally much to do in perfecting a sudden intimacy between two young ladies: such as dress, balls, flirtations, and quizzes. Northanger Abbey

* * *

'Here is a young man wishing to pay his addresses to you, with everything to recommend him: not merely situation in life, fortune, and character, but with more than common agreeableness, with address and conversation pleasing to everybody.' Sir Thomas Bertram on Henry Crawford, Mansfield Park

CHAPTER 7

Class and Wealth

* * *

'If they had uncles enough to fill all Cheapside,' cried Bingley, 'it would not make them one jot less agreeable.' 'But it must very materially lessen their chance of marrying men of any consideration in the world,' replied Darcy. Pride and Prejudice

* * *

It would be an excellent match, for he was rich, and she was handsome. Sense and Sensibility


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Quotable Austen by Max Morris. Copyright © 2014 Summersdale Publishers Ltd. Excerpted by permission of Summersdale Publishers Ltd.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
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Table of Contents

Contents

Matters of the Heart,
Love's Disappointments,
Health and Happiness,
Good Manners,
The Arts,
Conversation,
Class and Wealth,
Wicked Wit,
Philosophical Thoughts,

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