The Railway Children

The Railway Children

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781400151899
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date: 12/07/2005
Series: Unabridged Classics in Audio Series
Edition description: MP3 - Unabridged CD
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range: 9 - 12 Years

About the Author

E. Nesbit 1858-1924, was an English author and poet, who wrote or collaborated on more than 60 works of fiction for children, several of which have been adapted for film and television and are still popular today, such as The Treasure Seekers and Five Children and It.

Read an Excerpt

They were not railway children to begin with. I don't suppose they had ever thought about railways except as a means of getting to Maskelyne and cook's, the Pantomime, Zoological Gardens and Madame Tussaud's. They were just ordinary suburban children, and they lived with their Father and Mother in an ordinary red-brick-fronted villa, with coloured glass in the front door, a tiled passage that was called a hall, a bathroom with hot and cold water, electric bells, French windows, and a good deal of white paint, and 'every modern convenience', as the house-agents say.There were three of them. Roberta was the eldest. Of course, Mothers never have favourites, but if their Mother had a favourite, it might have been Roberta. Next came Peter, who wished to be an Engineer when he grew up; and the youngest was Phyllis, who meant extremely well.Mother did not spend all her time in paying dull calls to dull ladies, and sitting dully at home waiting for dull ladies to pay calls to her. She was almost always there, ready to play with the children, and read to them, and help them to do their home-lessons. Besides this she used to write stories for them while they were at school, and read them aloud after tea, and she always made up funny pieces of poetry for their birthdays  and for other great occasions, such as the christening of new kittens, or the furnishing of the dolls house, or the time when they were getting over the mumps.These three lucky children always had everything they needed: pretty clothes, good fires, a lovely nursery with heaps of toys, and a Mother Goose wallpaper. They had a kind and merry nursemaid, and a dog who was called James and who was their very own. They also had a Father who was just perfect - never cross, never unjust, and always ready for a game - at least, if at any time he was not ready, he always had an excellent reason for it, and explained the reason to the children so interestingly and funnily that they felt sure he couldn't help himself.You will think that they ought to have been very happy. And so they were, but they did not know how happy till the pretty life in Edgecombe Villa was over and done with, and they had to live a very different life indeed...  

(Continues…)



Excerpted from "The Railway Children"
by .
Copyright © 2011 E. Nesbit.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Young Readers Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

1 The Beginning of Things 1

2 Peter's Coalmine 24

3 The Old Gentleman 52

4 The Engine-Burglar 76

5 Prisoners and Captives 103

6 Saviours of the Train 122

7 For Valour 143

8 The Amateur Fireman 167

9 The Pride of Perks 188

10 The Terrible Secret 211

11 The Hound in the Red Jersey 231

12 What Bobbie Brought Home 257

13 The Hound's Grandfather 277

14 The End 300

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"They were not railway children to begin with. I don't suppose they had ever thought about railways except as a means of getting to Maskelyne and Cook's, the Pantomime, Zoological Gardens, and Madame Tussaud's. They were just ordinary suburban children, and they lived with their Father and Mother in an ordinary red-brick-fronted villa, with colored glass in the front door, a tiled passage that was called a hall, a bathroom with hot and cold water, electric bells, French windows, and a good deal of white paint, and 'every modern convenience', as the house-agents say."

Customer Reviews

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The Railway Children 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. I liked reading it to my kids. We all got a good laugh and I think that all of us cried. I recomend this book to families who like a funny and emotional story!
LaurenBDavis More than 1 year ago
There is something perfectly lovely about all E. Nesbit's books, and they certainly formed the backdrop to many a day when I was a little girl. Reading this particular book as an adult fills me with not only with pleasure but with a deeper understanding. I could not help but wonder if this story, of a father wrongly accused and imprisoned, was not inspired by the Dreyfus affair, which was certainly preoccupying many people's minds at the time. One of the delights of Nesbit's writing is that she never condescends to her young readers. Complicated questions of justice, of charity, of the freedoms denied others -- there is quite a wonderful sequence involving a Russian political fugitive -- of absent parents and what it means to perform a heroic act. The children learn things indirectly, peeking into the world of adults from around the corners of childhood. It's very well done. One of the things that I noticed most this time around, though, was the amount of freedom children had. Can you imagine children left to play unsupervised in the woods, around a train station, by the train tunnels and tracks themselves? I will be showing my age here, but I recall many days spent wandering by myself in the fields and forests near my childhood home, expected to return only when I got hungry or the streetlights came on. Did I get into some mischief? Yes. Was it a bit dangerous? Yes. And was being left to create a world by myself, and sometimes with other children, good for my imagination, for my sense of independence, for developing a way of being in the world? Undeniably. I wonder, in fact, if I would have become a writer if I hadn't had those days, if I was driven from one place to another, one class to another, one computer to another. Well, that's an essay for another place. Here, I'll simply say it was lovely to visit a world, so beautifully crafted, which probably now exists no where except between the pages of a book. Recommended.
SleepDreamWrite More than 1 year ago
This is a really good book with three likable kids and a strong mother. The drawings were also good that helped imagine the story. Liked the writing style too.
qoomomo on LibraryThing 16 days ago
I enjoyed this story. One day the father of 3 children left from their house. From that day they're said to be poor by mother. But they didn't know why they should do so. And they face many difficulties, but they also meet good person and thigs. And does their father come or not..?I enjoyed this story. I felt love of family from this story. Family is very important. And the 3 children have so warm heart. I should learn from them!
jkessluk on LibraryThing 17 days ago
A very interesting story that's over 100 years old. It is a third person story where the narrator describes the life of three children who come from a wealthy family, until their dad is taken from then and they have to move into a poor town. The children have to stop going to school, and in turn learn all about railroads, and become hero's. The language is fantastic and confusing at time, but you must remember that this tale of bravery takes place and the beginning of the 20th century in Great Britain.
Anonymous 19 days ago
It was awesome
mniaknuacat on LibraryThing 20 days ago
One rich family were changed their life by their father's disappearance.Three children Roberta¿Peter¿Phyllis and their mother began to start live near railway.Children meet many people and experience many things there.It is interesting that children do things one after the other.But I was surprised that the truth of their father's disappearance.I couldn't expect it.
ronta on LibraryThing 20 days ago
There were three children:Roberta,Phyllis and Peter.One day,their father went away and they must leave their town.However,they cooperate with each other and enjoy their new life.I think this strory is good but not interesting very much.
marsap on LibraryThing 23 days ago
A wonderful children's book, written more than 100 years ago. It is the story of 3 siblings Roberta (Bobbi), Peter & Phyllis who must move to a small cottage in a little town when their father is mysteriously taken away. They meet many of the town's folk; including Perks the railway Porter and the Old Gentleman, a rider on the train. While their mother writes stories to support them, they go off and have many wonderful adventures. What I especially enjoyed about this book is how real these children were; they argue, fight, make up and behave like "regular" siblings. I would recommend this book for children 8 to 12 years old or for families to enjoy together.
jigsaw999 on LibraryThing 23 days ago
it is a great book for all ages.a loveing story about three cildren.how has tots of fun to geather
lhanes on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Family oriented books are a great way to get kids to open up and talk about their own experiences. In this book there were two sisters and one brother.It tells the tale of woes taht some poverty stircken families face and how this particualr family worked together and overcame their hardships together. This story may be an old story but It really has rellevant issues taht can be discussed in a classroom setting. This is one of those intrigueing stories because when read aloud the kids can visualize exactly what is going on. We could also incorporate this book in a problem solving lesson. ie.. We could talk about the issues that family faced and what other options they could have tried that may or may not have turned out differently.
MariaAlhambra on LibraryThing 24 days ago
A delightful and multi-layered children's adventure, focused on three London children who suddenly have to move to the countryside as their father mysteriously goes away. The pathos of the story lies in the cotrast between the children's enthusiams for theit new surroundings and the slow realization of
johnthefireman on LibraryThing 5 months ago
What a classic! A great read for children and adults, and quite realistic railway action to boot.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Written in an almost puerile manner. I cannot recommend this book to anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My British Dad read this to me when I was a littler kid and i really enjoyed it!!!!!! :)
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of her favorite books
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It really is.
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He is chained up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This tale is gripping and uplifting, despite archaic language and too many convenient coincidences. Teens, pre-teens, and bright 4th graders will absorb the message of kindness and generosity without feeling hammered, because the characters command your respect and stir your emotions. GREAT read-aloud story for parents, who could benefit from reminders to stop driving so hard and just appreciate individuality.
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