ISBN-10:
0137025033
ISBN-13:
9780137025039
Pub. Date:
04/10/2011
Publisher:
Pearson
Readings in Management Accounting / Edition 6

Readings in Management Accounting / Edition 6

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780137025039
Publisher: Pearson
Publication date: 04/10/2011
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 312
Sales rank: 647,606
Product dimensions: 8.50(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

S. Mark Young holds the KPMG Professor of Accounting and is also Professor of Management and Organization at the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California. Previously, Dr. Young served as the Associate Dean for Academic Planning and Associate Dean and Academic Director of the Marshall MBA (Full-Time MBA) Program. Professor Young received an A.B. from Oberlin College (Economics), an M. Acc. from the Ohio State University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh.

Professor Young has published research in a variety of journals including The Accounting Review, Accounting, Organizations and Society, and the Journal of Accounting Research. Currently, he is on the editorial board of four major journals and was past Associate Editor for The Accounting Review. Much of his research has been sponsored by major research grants from the National Science Foundation, the Consortium for Advanced Manufacturing International, and The Institute of Management Accountants. In 1994, Young and coauthor Professor Frank Selto won the Notable Contributions to the Management Accounting Literature Award. His most recent book is Implementing Management Innovations: Lessons Learned from Activity-Based Manufacturing in the US. Automobile Industry (coauthored with Shannon Anderson, Kluwer Academic Press, 2001). This book won the Notable Contributions to the Management Accounting Literature Award for 2003.

Dr. Young has extensive executive teaching and consulting experience having taught in executive programs for DaimlerChrysler, Texas Instruments, Shell Oil, AMGEN and British Airways. Mostrecently, Dr. Young has had consulting or research relationships with the First Data Corporation, the Chrysler Corporation, Texas Instruments, and Southwest Airlines. He has won four outstanding teaching awards at the undergraduate and graduate levels, including the Golden Apple Teaching Award at USC. In 2003, Professor Young was named a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Excellence in Teaching at USC. Only five faculty members across all academic departments at USC received this award.

Professor Young also maintains an interest in popular culture particularly in the areas of science fiction and vintage space toys. He has written articles for Filmfax Magazine—The Magazine of Unusual Film and Television, The Old Toy Soldier, and The Scoop (an online magazine devoted to popular culture). Recently, he and coauthors Mike Richardson and Steve Duin published, Blast Off! Rockets, Robots, Ray Guns, and Rarities from the Golden Age of Space Toys (Dark Horse Books, 2001) a volume on the social history of vintage space toys. This book served as the museum show catalog for Blast Off! Space Toys and the American Imagination at The California Center for the Arts in Escondido, California in 2001 and accompanied another major show at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago in 2002.

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

While this book can be used to supplement any management or cost accounting text, the readings have been designed to accompany Anthony Atkinson, Rajiv Banker, R. S. Kaplan and S. Mark Young's textbook, Management Accounting, 3rd Edition (Prentice Hall, 2001).

To Students

For each textbook chapter there is a corresponding set of readings that highlights text material and introduces you to applications of the material in a wide variety of contexts. At the end of each reading, questions test your understanding of what you have read. The readings are taken from many sources including the Wall Street Journal, Management Accounting, Journal of Cost Management, Harvard Business Review and others. They represent very current thinking on each of the topics covered in the text.

Probably the best way to use this book is to read each assigned article in one sitting. Then, read the article a second time taking notes and asking yourself how the article extends your understanding of the text material. In some cases, your instructor may assign specific questions that follow each of the readings. Taking the time to answer these questions thoughtfully will improve your understanding of the material. I hope you find the material stimulating and thought-provoking.

To Instructors

Readings in Management Accounting, Third Edition contains thirty-nine articles representing state-of-the-art thinking and examples on a wide variety of management accounting topics in many types of service and manufacturing contexts. The third edition has been updated from the second with the inclusion of thirteennew, recently published articles.

Readings in Management Accounting, Third Edition is designed primarily to be used with Atkinson, Banker, Kaplan and Young's text, Management Accounting, Second Edition (Prentice Hall, 2001). After publication of the first edition, however, I discovered that a number of instructors who had adopted a different textbook had chosen to use Readings in Management Accounting as a supplementary text, or in some cases as a stand-alone text. To aid these instructors, I have written a separate Instructor's Manual (available from Prentice Hall) which keys the readings in this book to chapters in a number of other leading texts. Thus, suggested solutions to the questions in this book can be found in both the Instructor's Manual to the text Management Accounting as well as in the separate Instructor's Manual prepared for Readings in Management Accounting. While each of the readings has been listed for a specific chapter, in many cases, a reading may successfully be applied to several chapters.

If you have a favorite reading that is not contained in this book, please send me a copy and I will gladly consider it for the next edition. Thank you very much.

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank Kathryn Sheehan for her editorial assistance and Debbie Hoffman and P. J. Boardman for their encouragement and support of the project. Also, I would like to thank Bob Kaplan, Harvard University, Gerald Meyers, Pacific Lutheran University, Mike Shields, Michigan State and Shannon Anderson, University of Michigan for readings suggestions. In particular I am grateful to Ella Mae Matsumura, University of Wisconsin, Madison for her very thoughtful critique of the first and second editions of this book.

S. Mark Young
Leventhal School of Accounting
Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California

January, 2000

Table of Contents

(NOTE: All items marked (*) are new to this edition. Some of the listed articles may change by the date of publication.)
1. Management Accounting: Information That Creates Value.
P. F. Drucker, "Be Data Literate - Know What to Know"W. J. Bruns, Jr. and S. M. McKinnon, "What Production Managers Really Want to Know...D.P. Keegan and R.G. Eiler, Let's Reengineer Cost Accounting.

2. The Organization As A System Of Activity.
J.K. Shank and V. Govindarajan, "Strategic Cost Management and the Value Chain", * F.H. Selto and D.W. Jasinski, "ABC and High Technology: A Story with a Moral", G.Foster and C.T. Horngren, "Cost Accounting and Cost Management in a JIT Environment".

3. Cost Concepts.
R. Cooper and R.S. Kaplan, "Activity-Based Systems: Measuring the Costs of Resource Usage". R.Cooper, "Cost Classification in Unit-Based and Activity- Based Manufacturing Cost Systems".J.G. Kreuze and G.E. Newell, "ABC and Life-Cycle Costing for Environmental Expenditures".

4. Cost Behavior.
R. Cooper and R.S. Kaplan, "How Cost Accounting Distorts Product Costs".H.P. Roth and T.L. Albright, "What Are the Costs of Variability?".R.E. Drtina, "The Outsourcing Decision".

5. Basic Product Costing Systems.
R. Cooper, "Cost Management Concepts and Principles". N.Raffish, "How Much Does that Product Really Cost?".*W.M. Baker, T.D. Fry, and K.Karwan, "The Rise and Fall of Time-Based Manufacturing".

6. Two-Stage Cost Allocation and Activity-Based Costing Systems.
*T.L. Estrin, J. Kantor, and D.Albers, "Is ABC Suitable for Your Company?".W.Rotch, "Activity-Based Costing in Service Industries".D.Carlson, and S.M.Young, "Activity-Based Total Quality Management at American Express".L.P. Carr, "Unbundling the Cost of Hospitalization".

7. Pricing and Product Mix Decisions .
*E.Shim, and E.F. Sudit, "How Manufacturers Price Products".T.S. Duduck, "Pricing Strategies for Manufacturers". R.J.Lewis, "Activity-Based Costing for Marketing".*K.H. Manning, "Distribution Channel Profitability".

8. Process and Activity Decisions.
A. Faye Borthick and H.P. Roth, "Accounting for Time: Reengineering Business Processes to Improve Responsiveness". *D.Dhavale, "Activity-Based Costing in Cellular Manufacturing Systems".

9. Budgeting: Resource Allocation to Achieve Organizational Objectives.
*R. Drtina, S. Hoeger, and J. Schaub, "Continuous Budgeting at the Hon Company".T.A. Stewart, "Why Budgets Are Bad For Business".

10. Capital Budgeting.
*J.K. Shank and V. Govindarajan, "Strategic Cost Analysis of Technological Investments". S. Kalagnanam and S.K. Schmidt,"Analyzing Capital Investments in New Products". B. Hamner and C.H. Stinson"Managerial Accounting and Environmental Compliance Costs".

11. Planning and Control.
*R.S. Kaplan and D.P. Norton, "Using the Balanced Scorecard as a Strategic Management System". K.Merchant, "The Control Function of Management". G.H.B. Ross,"Revolution in Management Control".

12. Financial Control.
M. Beishcel, and K.R. Smith,"Linking the shop Floor to the Top Floor".*S.F. Jablonsky and P.J. Keating, "Financial Managers:Business Advocates or Corporate Cops?" R.Kaplan, "Flexible Budgeting in an Activity-Based Costing Framework".

13. Contemporary Management Accounting: Methods To Stay Competitive.
*R. Cooper and W.B. Chew,"Control Tommorow's Costs Through Today's Designs".*J.K. Shank and V.Govindarajan, "Measuring the Cost of Quality: A Strategic Cost Management Perspective". G. Foster, M. Gupta, L. Sjoblom, "Customer Profitability Analysis: Challenges and New Directions".

14. Compensation Issues.
*W. Imberman, "Is Gainsharing the Wave of the Future?". *B. Nelson,"Motivating Employees with Informal Rewards". A. Kohn,Why Incentive Plans Cannot Work".

15. Management Accounting and Control System Design: Behaviorial Factors And Change Management.
*G.S. Rechtschaffen and J.A. Yardley, "Whistleblowing and the Law".S.M. Young,"A Framework for Successful Adoption and Performance of Japanese Manufacturing Methods". J.A. Ness and T.G. Cucuzza, "Tapping the Full Potential of ABC". M.D. Shields, and A.A. McEwen, "Implementing Activity-Based Costing Systems Successfully".

Preface

Preface

While this book can be used to supplement any management or cost accounting text, the readings have been designed to accompany Anthony Atkinson, Rajiv Banker, R. S. Kaplan and S. Mark Young's textbook, Management Accounting, 3rd Edition (Prentice Hall, 2001).

To Students

For each textbook chapter there is a corresponding set of readings that highlights text material and introduces you to applications of the material in a wide variety of contexts. At the end of each reading, questions test your understanding of what you have read. The readings are taken from many sources including the Wall Street Journal, Management Accounting, Journal of Cost Management, Harvard Business Review and others. They represent very current thinking on each of the topics covered in the text.

Probably the best way to use this book is to read each assigned article in one sitting. Then, read the article a second time taking notes and asking yourself how the article extends your understanding of the text material. In some cases, your instructor may assign specific questions that follow each of the readings. Taking the time to answer these questions thoughtfully will improve your understanding of the material. I hope you find the material stimulating and thought-provoking.

To Instructors

Readings in Management Accounting, Third Edition contains thirty-nine articles representing state-of-the-artthinking and examples on a wide variety of management accounting topics in many types of service and manufacturing contexts. The third edition has been updated from the second with the inclusion of thirteen new, recently published articles.

Readings in Management Accounting, Third Edition is designed primarily to be used with Atkinson, Banker, Kaplan and Young's text, Management Accounting, Second Edition (Prentice Hall, 2001). After publication of the first edition, however, I discovered that a number of instructors who had adopted a different textbook had chosen to use Readings in Management Accounting as a supplementary text, or in some cases as a stand-alone text. To aid these instructors, I have written a separate Instructor's Manual (available from Prentice Hall) which keys the readings in this book to chapters in a number of other leading texts. Thus, suggested solutions to the questions in this book can be found in both the Instructor's Manual to the text Management Accounting as well as in the separate Instructor's Manual prepared for Readings in Management Accounting. While each of the readings has been listed for a specific chapter, in many cases, a reading may successfully be applied to several chapters.

If you have a favorite reading that is not contained in this book, please send me a copy and I will gladly consider it for the next edition. Thank you very much.

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank Kathryn Sheehan for her editorial assistance and Debbie Hoffman and P. J. Boardman for their encouragement and support of the project. Also, I would like to thank Bob Kaplan, Harvard University, Gerald Meyers, Pacific Lutheran University, Mike Shields, Michigan State and Shannon Anderson, University of Michigan for readings suggestions. In particular I am grateful to Ella Mae Matsumura, University of Wisconsin, Madison for her very thoughtful critique of the first and second editions of this book.

S. Mark Young
Leventhal School of Accounting
Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California

January, 2000

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