Real Photo Postcards: Unbelievable Images from the Collection of Harvey Tulcensky

Real Photo Postcards: Unbelievable Images from the Collection of Harvey Tulcensky

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781568985565
Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press
Publication date: 09/22/2005
Pages: 192
Product dimensions: 7.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.62(d)
Age Range: 13 - 18 Years

About the Author

Laetitia Wolff is the design editor of Surface magazine, the former editor of Graphis, and an international consultant on design trends and culture. She is the founder of the creative consultancy futureflair.

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Real Photo Postcards: Unbelievable Images from the Collection of Harvey Tulcensky 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
ajax1946 on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Loved the photos but wish that more of the card backs were shown. Those that were translated I would have liked to have those backs shown as well, just to get the full experience of reading the original handwriting as well as the translated text.
Henry_Berry More than 1 year ago
In the early 1900s, Kodak promoted real photo postcards which could be mailed for one cent through the post office using the company's first inexpensive, portable camera made for the public. Such a post card could be made out of any photograph taken by the camera. The nearly 200 real photo cards show the variety of ways the public responded to this opportunity to try out the new camera and get in touch with relatives and friends. People would send photos of parades, circuses, snowstorms, and pictures of themselves, often in playful poses or amusing settings. Some of the cards were surreal-like with their distortions in the sizes of objects which could also be amusing, as one from Kansas where a giant cricket is attacking a car and the note, 'See what we have to put up with out here.' The amateurish, popular use and subjects is apparent in practically all of the photo postcards. But what is also apparent--pointed out in the brief introductory essay--is the real photo postcards' part in familiarizing the public with the camera and interesting them in its possibilities, laying the grounds for the photojournalism and the art photography of the following decades.