Realizing E-Business with Components

Realizing E-Business with Components

by Paul Allen

Hardcover

$41.99

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780201675207
Publisher: Pearson Professional Education
Publication date: 10/13/2000
Series: Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series
Pages: 230
Product dimensions: 7.57(w) x 9.57(h) x 0.66(d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE: In April 1999 I joined Sterling Software from Select Software Tools. I was very excited because Sterling Software was doing great work with component-based development. Shortly after joining, however, I noticed I had a health problem, but was told it was nothing to worry about. During this period I settled into my new job, learning from my colleagues and enjoying working on different assignments. A few months later, after several misdiagnoses, I was diagnosed with testicular cancer. Before the end of the year, I had undergone a punishing course of chemotherapy. Right now I'm well again, but taking nothing for granted!
While the chemotherapy was unpleasant, it gave me plenty of time to think - if only to take my mind of its effects! I thought about the work I had done at Select, about the discussions I'd had with my new colleagues at Sterling Software, and the work we were doing with clients in applying component technology to the problems and opportunities of e-business. IT departments coping with the shift to e-business seemed like an aircraft that had to be re-engineered in flight. This book is the result of my reflections.
What this book Is about
Unfortunately, there is a great deal of hype and over-expectation surrounding e-business. Many organizations are jumping on the e-business bandwagon without understanding what they are getting into. Lack of planning and analysis, resulting in inflexible solutions that are unable to integrate with existing systems, are all too common. At the same time, e-business calls for a closer relationship between those involved in business development and those required to support these initiatives within the company'sinformation technology infrastructure.
This book is designed to provide practical advice for planning, analysis and design of e-business systems using component-based development (CBD). Just as e-business is more than a series of web pages, so CBD is not just an approach to problem solving using software building blocks. It includes architectures, processes, modeling techniques, economic models and organizational guidelines, all of which are well placed to ease migration of large organizations to e-business.
The book is long on practice and short on theory. Theory is included where relevant to practical problems. The core of the book is an extensive example that tracks the experiences of a typical company, with a traditional set of business processes and supporting software systems, through various stages along the road to e-business.
Who should read this book
This book is primarily intended for IT planners, architects, analysts and designers responsible for e-business solutions in large organizations. Equally it is aimed at business strategists, business process engineers and business architects. More significantly, this book is aimed at the new breeds of individual that are emerging, as the dividing lines between business and software grow increasingly blurred.
More broadly the book is intended for anyone interested in modeling business components. In particular, it is hoped that the increasing number of business component and framework vendors will benefit from the increased understanding that clear and precise component models provide of their products to their customers.
How to read this book
Naturally I would prefer it if you read the book cover to cover. However, with the exception of Chapter 6, which should be read after reading Chapter 5, each chapter of this book can be read individually and readers with specific interests can go straight to the subject of their choice. For those who are not familiar with component-based modeling techniques, it is important to refer to Appendix 2 for guidance. There are four parts to the book as follows.
First we set the scene and explain underlying principles
Chapter 1 introduces the need for a component-based approach to e-business systems, explains the basic principles of the approach and sets the emphasis on planning, analysis and business integration.
Chapter 2 looks at how to align e-business software development within the context of the organization's business goals and objectives.
Chapter 3 shows how to integrate business needs into a clearly defined component architecture.
Chapter 4 describes a truly component-based process framework and guidelines for dealing with these issues and to assist with planning and control of CBD for e-business.
Next we come to the core of the book: a continuous practical case study
Chapter 5 provides a practical case study of how to apply a component-based approach to e-business in an organization migrating to e-business, but wanting to protect and utilize its investments in existing systems.
Chapter 6 continues the case study and considers how to evolve the early solutions extending the scope to full business process integration and on to business transformation.
Third, we describe three key supporting strategies:
provisioning, funding and team organization
Chapter 7 looks at how components are provisioned and considers a range of different options including framework extension, wrapping, adapting, outsourcing, purchasing and bespoke design.
Chapter 8 describes tactical measures for funding component-based projects and provides metrics and costing criteria before considering how to identify benefits in the context of e-business.
Chapter 9 centers on team roles, providing guidance for projects at various stages along the road to e-business using components and considers how to use the roles to structure teams based on different organizational needs.
Finally, the appendices provide essential supporting information
Appendix 1 provides short descriptions of component and internet standards and typical accompanying physical architectures.
Appendix 2 provides a catalogue of component modeling techniques. The purpose is not to describe a complete definitive methodology, but to establish 'just enough' semantics and notation with hints and tips to guide the reader.
Acknowledgements
I have been fortunate to be working with a superb group of people at Sterling Software UK. First and foremost, I must thank the management team at Sterling Software UK for their unwavering support during a most difficult time healthwise: Sue Dixon, an exceptional lady, for her great kindness and compassion, Lori Wormald for her patience and understanding, Dan French for providing executive support and an environment of wonderful team spirit and Steve Olding and Danny Glover for their encouragement and support.
The material in this book draws on previous work of others who have pioneered CBD in Sterling Software. Credit is due to Alan Brown, John Cheesman, John Daniels and John Dodd and for supplying much of the intellectual foundation.
Others in Sterling Software and deserve special mention are as follows: John Assheton, Liz Cooper, Danny Saro, and Sue Whitehead for providing comments on early draft material, Suzanne Martin and Steve Turner for helping out with the case study examples; and Desiree Brennan for her excellent marketing assistance.
Special credit is due to Alan Brown and Sebastian Nokes (NetB2B2), both of whom provided very significant feedback that caused some major revisions to earlier material.
I thank my team of reviewers, external to Sterling Software, for providing useful insights and help: Alistair Gill, Simon Johnson, Meilir Page-Jones, David Sprott and Paul Turner.
Thanks are also due to my editor Clemens Syperski for his insightful comments and to Alison Birtwell of Addison Wesley Longman for her editorial management.
Last but not least I thank my family for putting up with my distraction for the best part of six months!

020167520XP04062001

Table of Contents

Foreword xvii
Preface xxi
Introduction
1(14)
The Internet age: An era of change
1(1)
The challenge of change
1(1)
Technology soup
2(1)
The adaptive enterprise
2(1)
e-Business in brief
2(3)
e-Commerce versus e-business
3(1)
The internet spectrum
3(1)
The challenges of e-business
4(1)
Components in Brief
5(5)
Component anatomy
6(1)
Separation of concerns
7(1)
Toward object maturity: How components help
7(1)
Business components
8(1)
Component-based development
8(1)
A word on modeling
9(1)
Meeting the challenges of e-business
10(3)
Top-down: Process and architecture
10(2)
Bottom-up: Integration
12(1)
Summary
13(1)
References
13(2)
Business-IT Alignment
15(14)
Introduction
15(1)
e-Business process improvement
15(7)
The concept of e-business process improvement
16(1)
e-Business process improvement planning
16(3)
e-Business process modeling (BPM)
19(3)
The business case for CBD
22(5)
Identifying business drivers
22(2)
Assessing architecture
24(1)
Assessing process
24(1)
Assessing organization
25(1)
Balancing strategy and delivery
26(1)
Summary
27(1)
References
27(2)
Component architecture
29(20)
Introduction
29(1)
An interface-based approach
29(3)
The separation of interface and implementation
29(2)
Interface-based design
31(1)
Integrating business processes and components
32(6)
The service-oriented view
32(1)
The criticality of architecture
32(2)
Structuring the business process model
34(1)
Value-added versus commodity components
35(1)
Architecture and e-business
36(2)
Dimensions of component architecture
38(9)
Level of abstraction
39(1)
Project versus enterprise architectures
39(1)
Architecture as integration model
40(1)
Forms of a component
41(2)
Specification versus implementation
43(1)
Architecture layering
44(2)
The main sequence
46(1)
Summary
47(1)
References
47(2)
Process guidelines
49(15)
Introduction
49(1)
The CBD process framework
50(7)
A track-based pattern
50(2)
Deliverables
52(2)
Integration
54(1)
Organizing deliverables within the track-based pattern
54(1)
Reuse checkpoints
55(2)
CBD process themes
57(5)
Iterative and incremental integration
57(1)
Hybrid integration
58(2)
Gap analysis
60(1)
Techniques versus deliverables
60(1)
Techniques overview
61(1)
Summary
62(1)
References
63(1)
Migrating to e-business
64(35)
Introduction
64(1)
Legacy renewal and EAI
64(4)
First generation e-business
64(1)
Legacy renewal
65(1)
Exploiting legacy systems
66(1)
Exploiting software packages
66(1)
Enterprise application integration
67(1)
Approaches to integration
68(2)
Architecture for integration
68(1)
Strategic versus tactical integration
68(2)
Example: Migrating to e-business
70(28)
e-Business process improvement planning
71(2)
Scoping software requirements
73(5)
Building an enterprise component architecture
78(5)
First increment: Rapid delivery
83(5)
Second increment: e-Business solution
88(10)
Summary
98(1)
References
98(1)
Realizing e-business
99(28)
Introduction
99(1)
Welcome back to Harry's
99(19)
e-Business process improvement planning
100(1)
Third increment: Personalization
101(6)
Fourth increment: improving the customer's experience
107(11)
Business transformation
118(7)
Adaptability
119(2)
Business process integration
121(1)
The role of CRM
122(2)
External services integration
124(1)
Summary
125(1)
References
125(2)
Provisioning strategies
127(17)
Introduction
127(1)
Gap analysis
127(5)
A world of choice
128(1)
Revisiting the CBD process
128(1)
Applying gap analysis
129(3)
Component provisioning keynotes
132(3)
The importance of business specification standards
133(1)
Visualizing provisioning strategy
133(1)
Component granularity
134(1)
Routes to component provision
135(7)
Purchasing components
135(1)
Outsourcing design and implementation
136(1)
Wrapping
137(1)
Adapting
138(1)
Extending interfaces
138(2)
Subscribing to virtual services
140(1)
Outsourcing using ASPs
141(1)
Summary
142(1)
References
142(2)
CBD funding strategies
144(17)
Introduction
144(1)
Funding challenges
144(2)
Cultural challenges
145(1)
Funding models
146(1)
Project funding
146(1)
Corporate funding
146(1)
Charging for components
147(1)
Choosing the right funding model
147(7)
'Components in advance'
148(1)
'Components as you go'
149(1)
'Components by opportunity'
150(2)
Examples of funding and charging
152(2)
Metrics
154(1)
Some rules of thumb
154(1)
Component cost-benefit factors
155(5)
CBD cost factors
155(1)
Identifying IT benefit factors
156(1)
Identifying business benefit factors
157(3)
Summary
160(1)
References
160(1)
e-Business team organization
161(59)
Introduction
161(1)
Team roles in context
162(3)
Basic definitions
162(1)
The significance of team roles
162(1)
Traditional teams versus e-business teams
162(1)
Leadership
163(1)
Shedding IT's anorak
164(1)
Further team attributes
164(1)
Types of e-business teams
165(1)
e-Business solution-oriented roles
165(3)
Executive sponsor
166(1)
Visionary
166(1)
Ambassador user
166(1)
Adviser user
166(1)
Solution designer
166(1)
Project manager
166(1)
Team leader
167(1)
e-Challenger
167(1)
Web master
167(1)
e-Business integrator
167(1)
Component-oriented roles
168(3)
Component sponsor
168(1)
Business component architect
168(1)
Technical component architect
169(1)
Component assessor
169(1)
Reuse manager
169(1)
Business component analyst
169(1)
Business component designer
170(1)
Technical component designer
170(1)
Legacy expert
170(1)
Component librarian
170(1)
Component certifier
171(1)
Component tester
171(1)
Business--IT alignment roles
171(1)
E-vangelist
171(1)
Provisioning strategy manager
171(1)
Business process coordination
172(1)
Component funding Manager
172(1)
Organizational models
172(2)
Brief historical observations
173(1)
Customization
173(1)
Using the track-based pattern
173(1)
Summary
174(1)
References
175(1)
Appendices
A1 Appendix 1: Component-oriented technologies
176(9)
Component and internet standards
176(1)
Component execution environments
176(1)
Microsoft's COM+
177(1)
CORBA
178(1)
EJB
178(1)
EJB and the CORBA component model
179(1)
XML
180(2)
Physical architecture
182(1)
Server-based architecture
182(1)
EAI tools
183(1)
References
184(1)
Appendix 2: Techniques at a glance
185(35)
Introduction
185(1)
Business modeling
186(1)
Business modeling concepts
186(1)
Business modeling notation
187(2)
Business modeling quick guide
189(2)
Business modeling tips and hints
191(1)
Business type modeling
192(1)
Business type modeling concepts
192(1)
Business type modeling notation
193(1)
Business type modeling quick guide
193(2)
Business type modeling tips and hints
195(1)
Use case modeling
196(1)
Use case modeling concepts
196(1)
Use case modeling notation
196(2)
Use case modeling quick guide
198(1)
Use case modeling tips and hints
199(1)
Component architecture modeling
200(1)
Component architecture modeling concepts
200(2)
Component architecture modeling notation
202(4)
Component architecture modeling quick guide
206(1)
Component architecture modeling tips and hints
207(2)
Interaction modeling
209(1)
Interaction modeling concepts
209(1)
Interaction modeling notation
209(3)
Interaction modeling quick guide
212(1)
Interaction modeling tips and hints
212(1)
Specification modeling
213(1)
Specification modeling concepts
213(1)
Specification modeling notation
214(3)
Specification modeling quick guide
217(1)
Specification modeling tips and hints
217(1)
References
218(2)
Abbreviations 220(3)
Index 223

Preface

PREFACE: In April 1999 I joined Sterling Software from Select Software Tools. I was very excited because Sterling Software was doing great work with component-based development. Shortly after joining, however, I noticed I had a health problem, but was told it was nothing to worry about. During this period I settled into my new job, learning from my colleagues and enjoying working on different assignments. A few months later, after several misdiagnoses, I was diagnosed with testicular cancer. Before the end of the year, I had undergone a punishing course of chemotherapy. Right now I'm well again, but taking nothing for granted!
While the chemotherapy was unpleasant, it gave me plenty of time to think - if only to take my mind of its effects! I thought about the work I had done at Select, about the discussions I'd had with my new colleagues at Sterling Software, and the work we were doing with clients in applying component technology to the problems and opportunities of e-business. IT departments coping with the shift to e-business seemed like an aircraft that had to be re-engineered in flight. This book is the result of my reflections.
What this book Is about
Unfortunately, there is a great deal of hype and over-expectation surrounding e-business. Many organizations are jumping on the e-business bandwagon without understanding what they are getting into. Lack of planning and analysis, resulting in inflexible solutions that are unable to integrate with existing systems, are all too common. At the same time, e-business calls for a closer relationship between those involved in business development and those required to support these initiatives within thecompany'sinformation technology infrastructure.
This book is designed to provide practical advice for planning, analysis and design of e-business systems using component-based development (CBD). Just as e-business is more than a series of web pages, so CBD is not just an approach to problem solving using software building blocks. It includes architectures, processes, modeling techniques, economic models and organizational guidelines, all of which are well placed to ease migration of large organizations to e-business.
The book is long on practice and short on theory. Theory is included where relevant to practical problems. The core of the book is an extensive example that tracks the experiences of a typical company, with a traditional set of business processes and supporting software systems, through various stages along the road to e-business.
Who should read this book
This book is primarily intended for IT planners, architects, analysts and designers responsible for e-business solutions in large organizations. Equally it is aimed at business strategists, business process engineers and business architects. More significantly, this book is aimed at the new breeds of individual that are emerging, as the dividing lines between business and software grow increasingly blurred.
More broadly the book is intended for anyone interested in modeling business components. In particular, it is hoped that the increasing number of business component and framework vendors will benefit from the increased understanding that clear and precise component models provide of their products to their customers.
How to read this book
Naturally I would prefer it if you read the book cover to cover. However, with the exception of Chapter 6, which should be read after reading Chapter 5, each chapter of this book can be read individually and readers with specific interests can go straight to the subject of their choice. For those who are not familiar with component-based modeling techniques, it is important to refer to Appendix 2 for guidance. There are four parts to the book as follows.
First we set the scene and explain underlying principles
Chapter 1 introduces the need for a component-based approach to e-business systems, explains the basic principles of the approach and sets the emphasis on planning, analysis and business integration.
Chapter 2 looks at how to align e-business software development within the context of the organization's business goals and objectives.
Chapter 3 shows how to integrate business needs into a clearly defined component architecture.
Chapter 4 describes a truly component-based process framework and guidelines for dealing with these issues and to assist with planning and control of CBD for e-business.
Next we come to the core of the book: a continuous practical case study
Chapter 5 provides a practical case study of how to apply a component-based approach to e-business in an organization migrating to e-business, but wanting to protect and utilize its investments in existing systems.
Chapter 6 continues the case study and considers how to evolve the early solutions extending the scope to full business process integration and on to business transformation.
Third, we describe three key supporting strategies:
provisioning, funding and team organization
Chapter 7 looks at how components are provisioned and considers a range of different options including framework extension, wrapping, adapting, outsourcing, purchasing and bespoke design.
Chapter 8 describes tactical measures for funding component-based projects and provides metrics and costing criteria before considering how to identify benefits in the context of e-business.
Chapter 9 centers on team roles, providing guidance for projects at various stages along the road to e-business using components and considers how to use the roles to structure teams based on different organizational needs.
Finally, the appendices provide essential supporting information
Appendix 1 provides short descriptions of component and internet standards and typical accompanying physical architectures.
Appendix 2 provides a catalogue of component modeling techniques. The purpose is not to describe a complete definitive methodology, but to establish 'just enough' semantics and notation with hints and tips to guide the reader.
Acknowledgements
I have been fortunate to be working with a superb group of people at Sterling Software UK. First and foremost, I must thank the management team at Sterling Software UK for their unwavering support during a most difficult time healthwise: Sue Dixon, an exceptional lady, for her great kindness and compassion, Lori Wormald for her patience and understanding, Dan French for providing executive support and an environment of wonderful team spirit and Steve Olding and Danny Glover for their encouragement and support.
The material in this book draws on previous work of others who have pioneered CBD in Sterling Software. Credit is due to Alan Brown, John Cheesman, John Daniels and John Dodd and for supplying much of the intellectual foundation.
Others in Sterling Software and deserve special mention are as follows: John Assheton, Liz Cooper, Danny Saro, and Sue Whitehead for providing comments on early draft material, Suzanne Martin and Steve Turner for helping out with the case study examples; and Desiree Brennan for her excellent marketing assistance.
Special credit is due to Alan Brown and Sebastian Nokes (NetB2B2), both of whom provided very significant feedback that caused some major revisions to earlier material.
I thank my team of reviewers, external to Sterling Software, for providing useful insights and help: Alistair Gill, Simon Johnson, Meilir Page-Jones, David Sprott and Paul Turner.
Thanks are also due to my editor Clemens Syperski for his insightful comments and to Alison Birtwell of Addison Wesley Longman for her editorial management.
Last but not least I thank my family for putting up with my distraction for the best part of six months!

020167520XP04062001

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews