The Reapers (Charlie Parker Series #7)

The Reapers (Charlie Parker Series #7)

by John Connolly

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781501122675
Publisher: Atria/Emily Bestler Books
Publication date: 11/24/2015
Series: Charlie Parker Series , #7
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 201,830
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

John Connolly is the author of the Charlie Parker series of mystery novels, the supernatural collection Nocturnes, the Samuel Johnson Trilogy for younger readers, and (with Jennifer Ridyard) the Chronicles of the Invaders series. He lives in Dublin, Ireland. For more information, see his website at JohnConnollyBooks.com, or follow him on Twitter @JConnollyBooks.

Hometown:

Dublin, Ireland

Date of Birth:

May 31, 1968

Place of Birth:

Dublin, Ireland

Education:

B.A. in English, Trinity College Dublin, 1992; M.A. in Journalism, Dublin City University, 1993

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

There are so many killings, so many victims, so many lives lost and ruined every day, that it can be hard to keep track of them all, hard to make the connections that might bring cases to a close. Some are obvious: the man who kills his girlfriend, then takes his own life, either out of remorse or because of his own inability to face the consequences of his actions; or the tit-for-tat murders of hoodlums, gangsters, drug dealers, each killing leading inexorably to another as the violence escalates. One death invites the next, extending a pale hand in greeting, grinning as the ax falls, the blade cuts. There is a chain of events that can easily be reconstructed, a clear trail for the law to follow.

But there are other killings that are harder to connect, the links between them obscured by great distances, by the passage of years, by the layering of this honeycomb world as time folds softly upon itself.

The honeycomb world does not hide secrets: it stores them. It is a repository of buried memories, of half-forgotten acts.

In the honeycomb world, everything is connected.

*
• *

The St. Daniil sat on Brightwater Court, not far from the cavernous dinner clubs on Brighton Beach Avenue and Coney Island Avenue where couples of all ages danced to music in Russian, Spanish, and English, ate Russian food, shared vodka and wine, and watched stage shows that would not have been out of place in some of the more modest Reno hotels, or on a cruise ship, yet the St. Daniil was far enough away from them to render itself distinct in any number of ways. The building that it occupied overlooked the ocean, and the boardwalk with its principal trio of restaurants, the Volna, the Tatiana, and the Winter Garden, now screened to protect their patrons from the cool sea breeze and the stinging sands. Nearby was the Brighton playground, where, during the day, old men sat at stone tables playing cards while children cavorted nearby, the young and the not-so-young united together in the same space. New condos had sprung up to the east and west, part of the transformation that Brighton Beach had undergone in recent years.

But the St. Daniil belonged to an older dispensation, a different Brighton Beach, one occupied by the kind of businesses that made their money from those who were on nodding terms with poverty: check-cashing services that took 25 percent of every check cashed, then offered loans at a similar monthly rate to cover the shortfall; discount stores that sold cheap crockery with cracked glaze, and firetrap Christmas decorations all year round; former mom-and-pop grocery stores that were now run by the kind of men who looked like they might have the remains of mom and pop rotting in their cellars; laundromats frequented by men who smelt of the streets and who would routinely strip down to filthy shorts and sit, nearly naked, waiting for their clothes to wash before giving them a single desultory spin in the dryer (for every quarter counted) and then dress in the still-damp clothes, folding the rest into plastic garbage bags and venturing back onto the streets, their garments steaming slightly in the air; pawnshops that did a steady trade in redeemed and unredeemed items, for there was always someone willing to benefit from the misfortune of another; and storefronts with no name above the window and only a battered counter inside, the shadowy business conducted within of no interest to those who needed to be told its nature. Most of those places were gone now, relegated to side streets, to less desirable neighborhoods, pushed farther and farther back from the avenue and the sea, although those who needed...

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The Reapers: A Thriller 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
But will not be the last. Chilling and darkly ominous novel. Loved it . Recomend whole heartedly!
copefiend2 on LibraryThing 5 months ago
I have read other books writing by John Connolly including ones in the Charlie Parker series and found this one lacking. This book took the supporting cast and put them smack dab at the center of the story. The twist of putting Louis and Angel in the lead grabbed my attention at first but this didn¿t last. The story started slow, flowed in the middle and the end was anticlimactic and expected. I felt the flashbacks to Louis¿s past which were intended to develop the character actually slowed the story down and I actually started skimming over some of them. When Charlie Parked (and motley crew) were introduced into the story it felt forced and unnatural. This book was not one of my favorites but I will give John Connolly and Charlie Parker another chance. I have not figured out how to give half stars yet so I guess this would be 2 out of 5 for me.
Darrol on LibraryThing 5 months ago
I had forgotten how much depth there is in this series. Except it kind of petered out in the end. I enjoyed the alliance the Louis and Angel maintained with the mechanics Willie and Arno, and of course the Fulci brothers are great fun. In the end, however, it is just petty killers going after each other. None of the moral seriousness that characterizes the first part of the book, with its discussion of Sundown Towns, informs the ending.
lchav52 on LibraryThing 5 months ago
THE REAPERS takes the reader into the shadowy world of a set of professional killers called Reapers. Louis and his partner Angel are Reapers, drawn into a trap. Excellent writing,plenty of action, a great book.
mikedraper on LibraryThing 5 months ago
In "The Reapers," John Connolly has given his readers some background on the history of Charlie Parker's humorous, homosexual sidekicks.Someone is after Louis because of something he saw when he was just a teenageer.Louis had a tragic childhood where his mother was murdered and then the killer returned to do more harm to other family members. Some of the evil that was done to Louis was due to racial hatred and this changed Louis from a shy boy into a cold blooded killer.The person hunting Louis is a man named Bliss. Bliss is known as a killer of killers, hence, a reaper. In his hunt for Louis, he targets not only Louis himself, but Louis' friend Angel, Louis' home and his business.In a departure that demonstrates John Connolly's versatility, it isn't Charlie Parker who is the central protagonist but his friend Louis. In fact, Parker makes only a tangential appearance in the later part of the story.There are no heroes in this dark story. The central characters are all men who have gotten to where they are through killings or having someone kill for them. The only decent character is a man named Willie who is the lone honorable man with a significant role in the story.The plot, as always with Connolly, is highly original and the characters of Louis and Angel are two of the more unique characters in literature today. The level of suspense was not as refined as the other Charlie Parker novels but overall the story was entertaining.
BudBarclay on LibraryThing 5 months ago
I must go back and read Connolly's earler works after experiencing The Reapers. It was a briliant idea to center the novel around what had been his protagonist's supporting cast: Louis and Angel. A tremendous read. An enthusiastic 4.5 satrs.
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mcbjack More than 1 year ago
I am a big fan of John Connolly but I was disappointed in this book. In my opinion too much time was spent waxing philosophical and not enough on action. This book is part of the Charlie Parker series yet the main character wasn't introduced till the last 1/3 of the book. All in all I still plan on reading the rest in the series.
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