The Rebellion of Jane Clarke: A Novel

The Rebellion of Jane Clarke: A Novel

by Sally Cabot Gunning

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061782152
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 04/26/2011
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 532,162
Product dimensions: 5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.68(d)

About the Author

A lifelong resident of New England, Sally Cabot Gunning has immersed herself in its history from a young age. She is the author of the critically acclaimed Satucket Novels—The Widow’s War, Bound, and The Rebellion of Jane Clarke—and, writing as Sally Cabot, the equally acclaimed Benjamin Franklin’s Bastard. She lives in Brewster, Massachusetts, with her husband, Tom.

What People are Saying About This

Anne LeClaire

“A gifted storyteller . . . has given us a deeply affecting tale of a woman caught between the irresistible currents of her inner truth and the equally powerful strictures of her times.”

Jacquelyn Mitchard

“Unlike many historical novelists, Gunning makes the long-ago feel like this very day. Elegantly, she tells bitter truths — that dignity and grace and even abiding love can flourish where it seems nothing can grow.”

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Rebellion of Jane Clarke 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 51 reviews.
ReviewsByMolly More than 1 year ago
Sally Gunning is a new-to-me author, but one I quickly became a fan of. She's got a talent for making her story, full of rich, historical detail, complex characters and mystery, come to life. Each of her characters spoke volumes amongst the pages and held my attention until the end of the story. Jane Clark. She is an absolutely fiercely independent woman. In the beginning, I wasn't sure I would like her story, but the more I read, the more I liked her. Refusing to marry the man her father had chosen for her, she is forced to move to Boston and live with her aunt. Once there, her life greatly changes when she befriends the British, and jeopardizes her brother life, who works for John Adams. All this happens right before the Boston Massacre. When the Boston Massacre occurs, Jane rethinks her life. She's unsure of herself and her place in society, and wants to find her place. Questions arise and twists and turns accompany Jane's thoughts on finding her true self. She is young, and confused, and through finding the answers she'll find her way. This is a novel that is stunningly full of rich historical stateside detail, unforgettable characters, and a time period that changed the world. While this was a superbly fast 4 star read, it was not always a "light" read. if you love history-filled stories that ring true, then I highly recommend the talented Sally Gunning's The Rebellion of Jane Clark. Like me, you're sure to become a full part of the story, and before you know it, you'll be on the last page and ready for more of her novels!
Gertt More than 1 year ago
The Rebellion of Jane Clarke is the story of a young girl sent to live with her elderly Aunt in Boston, for not abiding by her father's wishes. The history of the pre-Revolutionary War period leading up to the Boston Massacre is written to protray what Jane actually saw happening as oppose to what people were led to believe was happening, surprisingly not unlike today. The story is rich with period history and historical characters along with Jane discovering who and what is important in her life. An interesting and enjoyable book that holds your interest and thoughts even after the last page is read.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1769 in Satucket on Cape Cod, twenty-two years old Jane Clarke rejects marriage to the loyalist Phinnie Paine chosen by her father. Outraged by his daughter's disobedience, he exiles her to take care of her elderly great-aunt Gill in Boston. Jane enjoys the independence of not residing under her father's tyrannical thumb and being near the British Custom House, she meets some of the leaders demanding representation in parliament. She becomes friends with Henry Knox and through her brother meets John Adams. As the men she meets become increasingly frustrated with the British efforts to restrain Bostonians, she fears violence will happen as she realizes those fomenting revolt are not interested in truths that detract from their argument of throwing the British out. Finally her premonition turns true when several protestors are killed at what the rebelling colonists call the Boston Massacre. The Rebellion of Jane Clark is a super historical thriller that through the heroine's eyes focuses on key participants and others caught in the dispute in the days just prior to the American Revolution. The story line is fast-paced from the moment Jane is exiled to Boston and never slows down; yet enables readers to witness how divided the Massachusetts colonists were re revolt vs. allegiance. Sally Gunning's terrific tale brings to life the prime time players, their impact on others, and life in Boston as rebellion is on the minds of every citizen; with families divided between for, against, and neutral Harriet Klausner
AislinToo More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. You feel like you're walking next to Jane as she witnesses the birth of American Revolution.
NaryBethT More than 1 year ago
I am so glad I invested in this book. I read the previous two by Gunning and also liked them but this was by far my favorite. The main character, Jane Clarke, is a woman of her own mind and opinions. She is intelligent, compassionate and has a strong will without being overbearing. The historical events and persons of Boston, just before the break out of the Revolutionary War, are woven into this tale in a way that makes history come alive. I enjoyed every page of this book. I am left with a hunger for more by this author. Please write another Ms. Gunning!
BE-California More than 1 year ago
I liked this book. It was well written, and provided an interesting glimpse of that time period. Was it my favorite book ever? No, but it was a good read. For those of you who have read her other book, Bound, I didn't think it was quite as good as that one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Terrific NE Story. What a sense of pride in all this history.
baxter1946 More than 1 year ago
If you haven't read very much about the revolutionary war, this would be a good book to begin, because it has some human elements in it and not just dates. There are portions that have a little humor in them and some that makes you want to cry. In some areas we've come so far. I would read another book by this author. The problem with me reading all of the author's work, is that it all begins to sound the same. I like to try different authors, but will go back and read the authors I enjoy. I would recommend this for a book club discussion, there are numerous discussion points that could be addressed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
this follows the widows war and bound in greatness. i totally enjoyed this book and eagerly await another from her. wonderful characters, you can just imagine john adams down the street , just wonderful
Heather Bash More than 1 year ago
Enjoyed it!
kohkoh More than 1 year ago
Well written and gives a personal idea of the events of the period.
ReviewsbyMolly on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Sally Gunning is a new-to-me author, but one I quickly became a fan of. She's got a talent for making her story, full of rich, historical detail, complex characters and mystery, come to life. Each of her characters spoke volumes amongst the pages and held my attention until the end of the story.Jane Clark. She is an absolutely fiercely independent woman. In the beginning, I wasn't sure I would like her story, but the more I read, the more I liked her. Refusing to marry the man her father had chosen for her, she is forced to move to Boston and live with her aunt. Once there, her life greatly changes when she befriends the British, and jeopardizes her brother life, who works for John Adams. All this happens right before the Boston Massacre.When the Boston Massacre occurs, Jane rethinks her life. She's unsure of herself and her place in society, and wants to find her place. Questions arise and twists and turns accompany Jane's thoughts on finding her true self. She is young, and confused, and through finding the answers she'll find her way.This is a novel that is stunningly full of rich historical stateside detail, unforgettable characters, and a time period that changed the world. While this was a superbly fast 4 star read, it was not always a "light" read. if you love history-filled stories that ring true, then I highly recommend the talented Sally Gunning's The Rebellion of Jane Clark. Like me, you're sure to become a full part of the story, and before you know it, you'll be on the last page and ready for more of her novels!
exlibrisbitsy on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This historical novel takes place on the eve of the American Revolution. Jane is a young woman who lives in a world that is more in flux than she realizes. Families are facing off against families, revolutionaries against loyalists and even father against daughter as Jane questions her father¿s beliefs and actions and ultimately decides to not marry the man he has picked out for her.This results in her being sent to Boston to care for a sick aunt. While there she realizes things are not quite how they appear in the papers. The story unfolds as Jane rejects how other people tell her how she should think about and feel about the political climate at the time and determines that she will come to her own conclusions.Because Jane is not falling along party lines in a traditional manner it allows the reader to see things as they truly were in the Colonial era and that includes some of the hypocrisy and imperfect deeds on both sides of the coming war. A lot of the stereotypes and generalizations are discarded for true historical accuracy. The revolution was not perfect. Neither were our fore fathers. It's a little ridiculous to think that it all was perfect. This book embraces that and yet still gives a great deal of respect and weight to the reasons we went forward with the revolution anyway, warts and all. I appreciated this honesty.I also loved how the author wrote the book so that the story arc of this one young woman and her personal rebellion and search for truth in the midst of the much greater rebellion going on around her worked so well as an analogy to everything that was happening in the country at that time. Jane was a wonderful, strong character to read about and I was impressed by her determination and fortitude as she stood up for what she believed in throughout even when her number of supporters started to dwindle by the end.I did find it a little hard to get into the story at first, but by the half way point I was hooked and pulled right through to the end. Fans of historical novels will enjoy this book immensely.I received this book for free to review.
hobbitprincess on LibraryThing 8 months ago
I found this one on the "New Books" shelf at the library, and for some reason, I decided to try it out. It was ok. While I love historical fiction, American history isn't my favorite time period to read about, oddly enough. This book started to drag after a bit . . until this big plot twist that made me sit up and take notice. If you decide to read this, please stick with it! Many of the characters actually existed, and even the main character herself was based loosely on a real person. The main event in the book is the Boston Massacre and the subsequent trial. There is a bit of romance and some suspense thrown in. The characters are on both sides of the fence as far as American Independence is concerned, and I like that because I think that was probably the norm. All in all, not a bad read.
Bonpetitepoodle on LibraryThing 8 months ago
The Rebellion of Jane Clarke started out well but flickered out in the second chapter. What history was there was accurate but you could not get close to Jane's inner turmoil. A good book for time killing, but not a seat gripper.
cathyskye on LibraryThing 8 months ago
First Line: May 6, 1769. Jane Clarke stood in the sedge growth on the lip of the dune and looked out over the half-drained bay, the ribbons of sand rising up through the retreating water.Jane Clarke is a daddy's girl, but recent events in the small village of Satucket on Cape Cod have made the teenager question her father's motives and integrity. When her father tells her to marry the man he has chosen for her, Jane rebels and travels to Boston to nurse her invalid Aunt Gill.Aunt Gill lives near the British Custom House, and Jane finds herself in the heart of Boston's revolutionary fervor. She befriends bookseller Henry Knox, meets John Adams, and eventually finds herself in the middle of the Boston Massacre. As the situation grows more and more tense, Jane watches the men around her grow more aggressive in their hatred of British rule-- and less concerned with the truth. It's not long before she's forced to make a decision: which is more important, honesty or personal and political beliefs?Although this is the third novel concerning inhabitants of the small village of Satucket on Cape Cod, it does not have to be read in order. I've been a fan of Sally Gunning since I read her novel The Widow's War, and now whenever I feel the need to read of Colonial America, I look to her. Gunning is supremely skilled at sharing loads of period detail without weighting the narrative down, and even though you're being steeped in knowledge, the author's writing is fluid and stays focused on her characters and the larger issues of human nature.Jane was a character that I quickly came to like and to admire, and Gunning gives an entirely new perspective to familiar stories. If you enjoy well-written historical fiction with multi-faceted characters, you should definitely put Sally Gunning on your Must Read list.
brainella on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Jane Clarke is a young woman with a mind of her own. Living outside Boston before the Revolutionary War, she sees and hears many things. She is devoted to her family, loves her home and is planning on getting married. Jane suddenly turns down the man she is to marry because she does not feel she knows him well-enough to marry him. This angers her father, who in-turn sends her to Boston to care for an elderly aunt.Boston is home to the Sons of Liberty and many a revolutionary. Jane meets Henry Knox, a bookseller, and becomes aware of the different loyalties those who inhabit Boston carry. Her brother Nate, an ardent revolutionary, tries distinctly to convince Jane of the righteousness of the cause. Jane wants to make the decision for herself. She sees British soldiers abused by people, and abuse people, but still she wants to know her own mind before following anyone. After the Boston Massacre and the beating of James Otis, Jane begins to support the Glorious Cause.Throughout her political journey, Jane also takes a personal journey; one that lets her grows and matures, no longer being a girl but a woman. She returns to her home outside Boston and resumes her life independent of her father and a beau but definitely more aware of whom she is and what she wants.I see this book as the coming-of-age of a woman set in a time when women had few rights. Jane wants to make her father happy with her actions, but realizes she is the one who needs to be happy with her own choices. She witness betrayal, happiness, love, horror and violence -- through it all, Jane does her best to do what she feels is right. The research and background of Boston prior to the Revolution is quite good. The characters are developed well, and the story follows the history timeline wonderfully. I enjoyed the personal observations of Jane as a character ¿ how John Adams loved children, how Henry Knox befriended British soldiers though they disagreed politically ¿ she saw the whole picture not just one side. That leads the reader to do the same. I enjoyed this book quite a lot, though I would have liked a different ending.
bardsfingertips on LibraryThing 8 months ago
I was fooled by this book; deeply fooled. But I shan't say what the tomfoolery was nor shall I divulge as to how I came about as to becoming this book's tar & feathered fool. But, I will make the statement that I did enjoy being Sally Gunning's fool.This book is lovely, and if you allow me a few more extra words, I will tell you why.The Rebellion of Jane Clarke is is about the eponymous young woman who is coming of age to become married. The book's events take place in a small town called Satucket and the forthcoming establishment Boston, which both share the colony of Massachusetts. The time period is one I am unfamiliar with in literature: the pre-dawn of the American Revolutionary War. At this particular time period, soldiers from England begin to occupy Boston at the request of the king to keep a presence among the growing rebellion.So, that is the backdrop, but we also have this young woman by the name of Jane Clarke, who starts out in the novel as her father's favorite among her siblings. Her father is a bot of a swindler who has become wealthy within the small town and has also established as hot-headed enemy with the head of another wealthy family. A lawsuit brings about a man who works in Boston who the father feels is proper enough for Jane to marry, and thus demands she does as such. At this time, Jane has started questioning things...especially events that seem contrary to the opinion of he whom she loves: her father.Because of this questioning, because of the bubble of anxiety growing within her chest, because of her father's intentions as to why this man should be wed to Jane, she refuses the proposal. Of this action, Jane's father is humiliated and banishes her to live with an elderly aunt in Boston.In Boston, Jane becomes swept into the whirlwind that is the upcoming rebellion of the locals against the British. However, Jane, being a level-headed girl who does not give into the fancies of men embroiled by rage, simply observes and dictates back to her companions what is unfair ¿ much to their aghast, of course.On and on it goes, until Jane is smack in the middle of a massacre in which soldiers fire upon a revolting crowd. I do not want to give away what happens, but let us just say that Jane remains level-headed.A very charming aspect about this book is that the author has written it as if it were a product of its time. She uses both language and slang to describe things that are actually rather unfamiliar to me. But, she has somehow made it a smooth read where the prose is both descriptive and poetic if not equally so.With that said, an immensely enjoyable read from a history buff such as Sally Gunning is encouraging me to go out and purchase her two other novels. Another thing, though there is fiction here, much of what happens within the book is true to history; and many famous people within our American history show up and adds weight. John Adams, for instance, plays a crucial part in both the plot and Jane's own growth.
mlanzotti on LibraryThing 8 months ago
A thoughtful and well written exploration of what it was like to live in America on the eve of the revolutionary war. Told from the point of view of a young woman who has herself rebelled against her father,Jane Clarke is a wholly believable character.
MDLady on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Enjoyable read. Events leading up to the Boston Massacre as seen by Jane, a young woman with her own thoughts and feelings, regardless of what her father wants.
SusieBookworm on LibraryThing 8 months ago
I thought that this was a very historically accurate novel. I liked how it took place before the American Revolution began, instead of being about a particular battle like most historical novels set in the Revolution seem to be. It was also nice that the author incorporated literature into the novel, as the protagonist is introduced to some of the popular novels of the 18th century. While the book was fairly slow-paced, it was an enjoyable read that accurately depicted the political and social issues of the American Colonies shortly before the Revolution.
TheFlamingoReads on LibraryThing 8 months ago
By contemporary standards Jane Clarke isn't really much of a rebel. Taken in context, however, her bold decisions to turn her back on her father and stand up to the anti-British townsfolk of Boston during the end of the 18th century enable her to rise above the typical 'cooking, cleaning, and having babies' Revolutionary-era woman. That's what makes her interesting and more of a heroine than merely a character in this book. She is educated in a time when women were treated as little more than unpaid help with no opinions or convictions that mattered. When the story begins Jane lives at home with her father, his third wife, and her brother and sisters. Her relationship with her father is complicated - she adores him and knows that, in spite of his inability to show it, that he loves her as well. When she defies his wish that she marry a man that she knows she does not really know or love, she is sent from her small village of Satucket to be a caretaker for her seemingly eccentric aunt in Boston. While in Boston she meets a man that she thinks she may want to marry, but the politics of the times and her desire to follow her morals prevent her from following her heart. Jane sees the injustices done to both the citizens of Boston and the British soldiers sent to keep the resistance at bay. Through it all she remains confident, resolute, and defiant and that's refreshing given that most of the ladies of this era are written as love-struck airheads or meddling spinsters.The book is chock full of real people - you will recognize the names of Sam Adams, John Adams, and, perhaps, Henry Knox, as well as the bona fide case of "Winslow v. Clarke qui tam" and the Boston Massacre conflict. The historical aspects of the novel ring true and provide an intriguing look at the birth of a new nation and how our forefathers fought in the streets (and not just the battlefields) for liberty, justice, and equality. Each character is much more than a caricature set against real history situations. This book may be considered as part of the YA genre, but with the caveat that there is just one 'bad' word and a gratuitous bed scene. As historical fiction, it is informative and genuine good read from start to finish. The twist near the end was unexpected, yet believable.Follow Jane's journey toward finding her place in her family and society and how even the smallest act of rebellion can make a big difference.
SatansParakeet on LibraryThing 8 months ago
At the beginning of this book I was afraid for a few pages that I had picked up a sappy historical romance. It did not take me long to figure out that this was a much more complex story than that and the romance bits would be playing a fairly minor role. In fact, if you're looking for a romance you're likely to be disappointed by this novel. The ending is much less nicely tied up than those sorts of books tend to be.The book does present a believably accurate picture of the life of a young woman in America during the period that preceded the Revolutionary War. She is simultaneously conflicted about her choices for a husband and about which side to take in the upcoming rebellion. The novel walks us through her life as she seeks to come to terms with both of those situations. Overall, this is a very engaging and thought provoking novel that works on many levels.
ankhet on LibraryThing 8 months ago
When she refuses to marry the man her father wants her to marry, Jane is exiled to Boston to care for her elderly and ailing Aunt Gill. There she is witness to the growing unrest and sometimes explosive encounters between the residents of Boston and the soldiers who have been sent to pacify them, during the winter of 1769-70 and the year that follows.I thought it was a good historical YA novel. I liked that Jane, whose experiences and thoughts we as readers follow, saw all sides (not just the Tory or Patriot sides) and made up her own mind on matters - and let us readers do the same.
redwood5 on LibraryThing 8 months ago
I found The Rebellion of Jane Clark to be a nice, light, and informative read. I cannot speak for the historical accuracy of this novel as it has been years since I last studied the American Revolutionary War, but I appreciated that the reader is allowed to form their own opinions of the conflict. When Jane first arrives in Boston, she is fairly naive concerning the rebellion breaking out around her, and I found it refreshing that Jane didn't hate the British and wasn't out gallivanting around Boston throwing tea into the harbor or some such (as I almost expected to see in a novel about the revolutionary war written by an American author). One thing that bothered me slightly was the feud between the Clarkes and the Winslows, which in the description on the back cover of the book is made to seem a central part of the story, but is hardly mentioned once Jane arrives in Boston. I suppose the feud is supposed to parallel the relations between the Americans and the British, but all in all I felt the book wouldn't have lacked anything without it.