Rebuilding America's Legacy Cities: New Directions for the Industrial Heartland

Rebuilding America's Legacy Cities: New Directions for the Industrial Heartland

by Alan Mallach

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Overview

Rebuilding America's Legacy Cities: New Directions for the Industrial Heartland by Alan Mallach

For America's Legacy Cities-cities losing population and their economic base-this book puts forth strategies to create smaller, healthier cities. Creative strategies for using vacant land need to be matched with successful efforts to stabilize the local economy and re-engage residents in the workforce, and to reinvigorate the city's still-viable neighborhoods. This volume offers a broader discussion which recognizes the complex relationships between today's problems and their solutions.

The rich material contained in this volume provides thought-provoking reading for anyone concerned with the transformation of America's older industrial cities, either with respect to a specific city or from a broader perspective, whether the reader is a policymaker, practitioner, or concerned layperson. These chapters do not suggest that that the process of change will be an easy one. They do offer a robust collection of ideas and directions that can help animate local action or state policy and help practitioners and policymakers take the steps that may indeed lead to the smaller, stronger, and healthier city that the authors believe is possible.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781469923574
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 01/16/2012
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 392
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.87(d)

About the Author

Alan Mallach, senior fellow of the Center for Community Progress, is the author of many works on housing and planning, including "Bringing Buildings Back" and "Building a Better Urban Future: New Directions for Housing Policies in Weak Market Cities." He served as director of housing and economic development for Trenton, N.J. from 1990 to 1999. He is also a fellow at the Brookings Institution.

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