Recovering The Self: A Journal of Hope and Healing (Vol. II, No.3)

Recovering The Self: A Journal of Hope and Healing (Vol. II, No.3)

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Overview

Recovering the Self: A Journal of Hope and Healing (Vol. II, No. 3) July 2010



This issue explores the themes of recovery and healing through poetry, memoir, opinion, essays, fiction,
humor, art, media reviews and education. Contributors to RTS Journal come from around the globe to deliver unique perspectives you won't find anywhere else!
The theme of Volume II, Number 3 is Addiction and Recovery. Inside, we explore this and several other area of concern including:

  • Diet
  • Health
  • Fitness
  • Disaster Recovery
  • Abuse Survivors
  • Relationships
  • Grieving
  • Journaling

    ...
    and much more!



    This issue's contributors include: Morgan Phillips, Barbara Sinor, Christy Lowry, Margaret Placentra Johnston, Telaina Eriksen,
    David J. Roberts, Karen Sherman, Robin Lathangue, Patricia Wellingham-Jones,
    Sherry Jones Mayo, Alana Richardson, Sweta Srivastava Vikram, Jim Kelly, Tyler R. Tichelaar,
    Jo Ann Magill, Holli Kenley, Sam Vaknin, Robert Rugel, and George W. Doherty.



    Acclaim for Recovering The Self


    "Editor Ernest Dempsey does an admirable job of pulling this material together in a pleasing shape.
    Each piece offers a revelation, insight, or lesson for the reader to take away. The writing throughout is excellent."

    --Janet Riehl, author "Sightlines: A Poet's Diary"


    "I highly recommend a subscription to this journal, Recovering the Self, for professionals who are in the counseling profession or who deal with crisis situations. Readers involved with the healing process will also really enjoy this journal and feel inspired to continue on. The topics covered in the first journal alone, will motivate you to continue reading books on the subject matter presented. Guaranteed."

    --Paige Lovitt for Reader Views



    Visit us online at www.RecoveringSelf.com



    Published by Loving Healing Press www.LovingHealing.com



    Periodicals : Literary - Journal

    Self-Help : Personal Growth - Happiness
  • Product Details

    ISBN-13: 9781615990481
    Publisher: Loving Healing Press
    Publication date: 06/23/2010
    Pages: 98
    Product dimensions: 7.44(w) x 9.69(h) x 0.20(d)

    Read an Excerpt

    CHAPTER 1

    In Foster Care: My Journey

    ACD

    The following excerpt has been contributed by a teenage boy, whom we'll call "ACD", who was subject to intense abuse by his close family members. The young author has completed an autobiography which he intends to publish eventually. The story given here has been taken from this unpublished autobiographical account of the contributor.

    *
    Children's Protective Service made an emergency removal of me and my two younger sisters. We were taken away right in front of our biological family. They called it "an intervention to protect us from any imminent danger". All I understood it to be was a separation of my family. I was confused, sick to my stomach and a little scared for my sisters because they had no idea what was happening to them. We were split up and sent into two different placements. The girls were placed together, I watched helplessly as my sisters were carried down a long hallway screaming and kicking for their freedom. I felt sick and before I could tell the worker I needed a bucket – it happened all over the floor. I started to panic and just stared at her, I figured she was going to hurt me for making such a mess. To my surprise, she was so nice and didn't even yell, hit, or make me clean up my own mess. I was not used to that kind of treatment; I just figured she would let me have it later when no people were around. It was my turn to go to a placement; so reluctantly, I took my worker's hand and climbed into the back seat of her car. I was just tall enough to see out the side door window and as we pulled out of the parking lot, I waved to a stranger and just started to cry.

    The first thing my DHS worker did was make a direct stop at the emergency room with me. According to my physical examination on that day, it was revealed that multiple contusions covered my entire body. My head was noted as being severely contused and I was profusely vomiting. It was also documented that I appeared to be anemic and undernourished. I was released from the hospital to my worker and she took me to my foster placement. I still remember feeling so vulnerable. I was a boy that had just come from a life of horrendous abuse. I was uncertain about my future and plain scared to death. Looking back now, I think all the uncertainty happening in my life at that time allowed night terrors to take over my mind. It seemed the second I closed my eyes, it happened. And as if dealing with all that wasn't enough, I had problems wetting the bed every night.

    But – I quickly learned my issues were not appreciated nor were they going to be tolerated at this particular placement. My foster parents would force me to get out of bed every time I wet myself. I had to either stand in the corner for more than four hours at a time or sleep outside in their garage on the concrete floor with no bedding (like an animal).

    After enduring this cruel treatment for a little over a month, my caseworker came back to visit me. I was hesitant at first to report anything that they did to me. I feared my worker wouldn't believe me. As she began to question me about the foster family's hospitality, I could feel my stomach burning inside of me. I just couldn't bear the thought of another night. I took a deep breath and as fast as I could get the words to form and get out of my mouth, I had said it – I told everything. The family was investigated for questionable discipline methods and found guilty.

    I was getting the feeling that my entire life was turning into a series of crisis. I was bouncing from one foster home to another. Now, considering all of the earlier experiences I had just gone through, I couldn't help but feel insecure about myself and the rest of my life. The eldest boy in my new foster home attempted to molest me. I refused his advances and he threatened to hurt me "if" I told anyone. I was once again silenced by my shame and the fear of his threats. I also had a confused sense that I somehow might be to blame. The long-term consequences were starting to catch up with me. I began to lose control. I was once again moved and placed into a psychiatric hospital for a mental evaluation.

    All of the excruciating pain and tremendous sadness that I was left to deal with had just exploded. I was emotionally wounded and mentally scared all at the hands of my own care givers. I wanted to understand why this happened to me? I had enough of it and needed to take back control. I wanted the knowledge to liberate myself from my hurtful past. I wondered if it was even possible to take away the shame I was holding on to. I was stuck in the depths of my own hell. My new hope was to start by learning how to love myself.

    I slowly learned how to face my problems. I found the determination to rid my mind of all the unwanted emotional baggage that I had been dealing with. My life was starting to have some direction. My foster care case worker came to see me all the time. She gave me a letter of encouragement that I kept close to me and still cherish, and she said, "You're a remarkable boy, who is resilient, and one day you're going to regain self confidence. She went on to say how she believed in me and wanted me to keep moving forward and make myself a better life. She told me I'm a survivor and don't live my life chained to any guilt or regret.

    I promised my worker I would stay focused and not dwell on the negative things that had happened to me. She was helping me let go of the anger I was harboring towards my biological parents, through a process called empowerment. One of the steps in that process is to write a letter to whomever the anger was targeted. As strange as it seemed, I felt an apology was in order. I grabbed a pen and began to write the first thing that popped into my mind. I started it by saying:

    "I am sorry for all the embarrassing defects that I had the nerve to burden you with – All of the harsh treatment I forced you to give me day after day – I asked why you left me with all the bruises, broken bones, and burns, I thank them for all the scares I now carry around with me – All of it – Everything I forced them to make me endure in my life".

    And then, I folded it real small and placed it in a big round bowl and just watched as my worker flicked a match and dropped it on top of the letter. It really gave me a sense of freedom to watch it burn up. It allowed me to start my healing process on the inside. I was mentally relinquishing my rights to them. Nothing was going to impede my ability to move forward away from all that pain.

    CHAPTER 2

    Wake-up America!

    Barbara Sinor, PhD

    My son died last year of alcohol-related illnesses. His addiction story is not new or substantially different from the over 17 million other stories from the lives of those addicted to alcohol in America. Addicted or not, we all have stories to tell. Many recovering alcoholics are asked to write their inventory story while going through rehabilitation programs. These stories are sometimes called "drunk-alogs." They try to share only to fumble with words that scratch paper like chalk on a board from years past. Sometimes words come easy, flowing a river of grit and filth covering the pages black. They see only words, words mixed with the flavor of a whiskey-sour or the last pin-drop of vodka settling in an empty bottle next to a slip of dust. Words of truth swirl downward into a spiral dance with unrecognized poetry left for judgment. With no glimmer of hope to stay straight and sober, inventory stories read like buttons on a shirt, repetitious and dry. Given a year or two of sobriety and these same words can declare emotions of hope, guilt, remorse, and pain; they become the true stories of an alcoholic's life.

    To begin writing an addiction story is like poking at the nerve of a hangnail--clipping it may begin a healing but you refrain because pain dictates your life. Each paragraph brings that pain to the surface to be held in awesome awareness as you realize you have lived the words on the pages. It is often suggested to those early sobees that it is "... important to reflect and learn why you chose to use or drink." Alas, such a shallow carrot to dangle! The newly sober have only empty words which spillover onto a blank page; but given six months or six years, these same words flow easily from mind to pen. They reach deep for shards of memories to fill their stories full of pitiful choices and past sagas of desperation and depression. Words then become a tool to unfolding the corners of life revealing potent visions and rhythmic tales.

    Addicted or not, we all have stories to tell. We tell how our skin crawls at the slightest scent of cigarette smoke or our aversions to kissing a drunk. We tell where our choices took us or how our life was lived without us. Whether stories from alcoholics or straight-chaired grannies, words keep us searching for truth and in the end, guide us toward that Something More. Alcoholism is a wretched disease. It attacks all aspects of the soul; emotional, physical, psychological, and spiritual. Many times, if there is a firm spiritual belief (not necessarily religious) in place, the alcoholic can move into sobriety knowing he/she is forgiven for missing life's proverbial mark.

    In my book Tales of Addiction and Inspiration for Recovery, over twenty individuals share their heart-wrenching pain as their words unfold tales of being addicted to drugs and/or alcohol, or the stories of those whose loved one's addiction caused much trauma and emotional pain for them. We cannot judge, we cannot hide, but we can speak out about our life struggles with a disease that touches virtually every adult in America.

    There are approximately twenty million people in our nation in recovery from a drug and/or alcohol addiction. There are also approximately 22.3 million people living with a substance dependence or abuse--that's about ten percent of our national population. This is a reality, not a viewpoint or someone's illusionary judgment. These figures are real. These lives are real: Over forty-two million individuals are struggling with a drug and/or alcohol addiction.

    The how our nation became so entrapped in drugs is an easier answer than understanding why drugs are so desirable. The drug marketeers, beginning with drug dealers on our streets to well-established doctors to the drug cartels in other countries, all contribute to the above figures and to making drugs readily accessible. Ask any child age twelve and older how to obtain prescription pills, dope, or heroin, and they will tell you the name of a friend who bought some, or is selling it. No, it is not difficult to answer how our nation became so entrapped in drugs.

    My son's alcohol addiction story is no different than the other 17 million individuals who are still living their alcoholic lives in pain and struggle. But, my son's addiction story may hit the nerve which cries out for America to wake-up to the fact that our kids drink alcohol. It is easily found or purchased by most eighteen-year-olds and is extremely available on college campuses. The perils of drinking alcohol in the early years instill the younger body-mind with a sense of non-reality and ensure clear decision-making cannot be found. Their continuation of drinking alcohol guarantees a life riddled with dejection, depression, and sadness which accompany that of an alcoholic.

    Addiction in America can change. We all have the ability to redirect our lives and our futures. It takes only one thought to change our direction from victim to victory. It takes only one thought to manifest a new reality filled with joy and compassion. As Deepak Chopra relates, "... it is possible to achieve the freedom to have any viewpoint you choose and therefore any reality. Once you return to this basic viewpoint, however, you will no longer see yourself as a passive victim of life--you stand at the very center of life and have the power to renew it at every moment." In an instant, with a new positive thought, in the blink of an eye, you can become a new person and help our nation's addicted population dissolve.

    Are you ready to help change America's addiction to drugs and alcohol? Take a stand to make sure all the children in your care are taught how to express their feelings, negative and positive. Share with them your experiences in learning how to grow in compassion for others and support their budding beliefs about their world. Learn about their desires, fears, and dreams by continually talking with them one-on-one. As they grow, answer their questions openly and thoughtfully. Teach them to become independent; teach them to explore their outer world and their inner emotions. Allow them to laugh out loud, cry when they need, and seek information from others. Also, instruct them how to seek inner guidance and to listen to the small voice within them. If you can do all these things with all the children in your care, and if you can successfully complete all these things yourself, then perhaps, addiction in America will not continue to flourish.

    CHAPTER 3

    What It Feels Like to Live Where North Meets South and East Meets West

    Timothy Louis Baker

    My life began in Celina, Ohio, where I lived on a farm with my family. Dad helped me to learn the good work ethic from a very early age. When I was five years old, I began helping father mow the grass. When I was ten, I was driving tractors, pulling farm implements through his fields, and tending his crops. As time went by, I learned almost anything anybody would ever need to know to work Dad's land. I also began my use of alcohol and drugs at an early age. Then came criminal involvement, jails, juvenile institution, more jails, and even prisons and mental institutions.

    However, I did have time in my twenties that I spent out on my own, away from Dad's farm and away from the correctional facilities and mental institutions, by going away to live in the mountains of Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Michigan, and Minnesota in USA, plus Ontario and British Columbia in Canada.

    In my early thirties through my mid forties, I stayed in my hometown, where I worked on Dad's farm plus with my own business. I could find around doing odd jobs for others. I had a lawnmower and I mowed grass for people plus raked leaves in the fall and shoveled snow during winters.

    The money I earned went mostly for drugs and that is where I had been making my mistake for my adult lifetime so far. I kept taking drugs and getting into trouble for what I had to do to make money for buying them: lying, stealing, cheating, swindling, and even considering robbing with a gun; but I didn't actually commit that exact crime, i.e. robbing with a gun.

    There has been witchcraft practiced against me in the past, coupled with dishonest law enforcement officials and probation officers – all whom have conspired against my life. It started out over drugs and promptly moved on into the other facets of crime as I let myself fall to temptation. I committed crimes more frequently as I got older in order to provide a way to afford my drug habit at times.

    On the opposite of the black magic warlock, that introduced witchcraft to my life, there were the miracles of God that only He could provide. Throughout my life, I have had many instances of various uncanny, incredible miraculous events occurring every now and then. I have experienced time warps, being in two places at the same time, instant transfers from one place to another in the distance without physically traveling the space between. There have been episodes of time travel, being in more than one day before the sun ever set on me first, and events consisting of visits with parallel universes involving mountains, roads, streets, towns, cities, and buildings changing from occasion to occasion, and from one locality to the next.

    On some days, I started out with the sun appearing to me in the west in the mornings; and in the east in the evenings, on two separate occasions. In addition, most miraculously, some of my teeth once having been extracted by dentists have reappeared back into my living jaws even for months and years. Incredibly, certain articles have disappeared from my possession without any logical explanation. Finally, I have visited a flesh on flesh experience in Heaven and witnessed many other such incidences of divine power taking control and performing such miracles.

    Now anybody would have to concede that these occurrences are not a natural part of everyday life and that they had to have been only under the power of a higher power to make them happen. The in-the-flesh experience I had in Heaven was when I was thirty years old, on the road, poor; it was hard for me to find work. God gave me a glimmer of hope to go by for the rest of my life up until the present. I will always draw upon this episode of those miracles. Because it was what Heaven will be like when everyone and everything goes there to me; that is exactly what I saw with everyone and everything living forever perfectly with no evil, and it definitely would take God's powers to perform the perfect miracle of letting me, or anybody else, see it once.

    (Continues…)



    Excerpted from "Recovering the Self: A Journal of Hope and Healing Vol. II, No. 3 July 2010"
    by .
    Copyright © 2010 Loving Healing Press, Inc..
    Excerpted by permission of Loving Healing Press, Inc..
    All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
    Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

    Table of Contents

    From the Editor's Desk – Ernest Dempsey,
    Inspiration,
    About the Cover Artist – Morgan Phillips,
    Emergence,
    In Foster Care: My Journey – ACD,
    Addiction,
    Wake-up America! – Barbara Sinor,
    Memoir,
    What It Feels Like to Live Where North Meets South and East Meets West – T.L. Baker,
    Serendipity,
    Upon Wings of Eagles – Christy Lowry,
    Honoring Family,
    Things I Cannot Change – Margaret Placentra Johnston,
    Remembering Mom – Telaina Eriksen,
    Grieving,
    The Challenges of Grief Work with Chemically Dependent Individuals – D.J. Roberts,
    Relationships,
    Not Everything about Conflicts is Bad – Karen Sherman, PhD,
    Insight,
    Rethinking the "Monster" of Mental Illness – Robin Lathangue,
    Journaling to Heal – Patricia Wellingham-Jones,
    On Site,
    Disaster Relief: A Paramedic Turned RN – Sherry Jones Mayo,
    Natural Healing,
    Little Known Ways to Help Your Heart – Alana Richardson,
    Travel,
    Unplanned Destination – Sweta Srivastava Vikram,
    Fit Being,
    Exercise: A Vital Part of Your Day – Jim Kelly,
    Poetry,
    Guardian Angel – Michelle Lichtenfels,
    Single – Jo Ann Magill,
    Ode to Exercise – Christy Lowry,
    Fragile Threads – Patricia Wellingham-Jones,
    Cold Turkey – Sweta Srivastava Vikram,
    I'm Here For You – Tamura Freeman,
    Short Fiction,
    Flannel Shirt – Tyler R. Tichelaar, PhD,
    Interviews,
    Social Work and Psychiatric Patients: An Interview with Jeanne Echols – Jo Ann Magill,
    Eating the Perfect Diet: An Interview with Janice Stanger – Ernest Dempsey,
    Help Desk,
    When Private Matters are Made Public on the Internet – Holli Kenley,
    Excerpts,
    Is There Life After Abuse? – Gillian Jackson,
    Being There When It Counts: Mental Health Roles – George W. Doherty,
    Using the TRAP Sequence to Understand Arguments – Robert Rugel, PhD,
    Why Narcissists Cheat on their Spouses, Commit Adultery, and have Extramarital Affairs and,
    Liaisons – Sam Vaknin, PhD,
    Book Reviews,
    The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society,
    Still Here: Embracing Aging, Changing, and Dying,
    Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's,
    Movies,
    Finding Forrester,
    The Secret Life of Words,
    Touching Wild Horses,
    Press Release,
    New Book Provides Confidence Boost to Children with AD/HD,
    Freedom Found in Identifying and Defeating Controlling Personas,
    Recovering The Self: Call for Submissions,

    Customer Reviews

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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    Recovering The Self: A Journal of Hope and Healing (Vol. II, No. 4) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
    Jennifer2000 More than 1 year ago
    I found this issue of Recovering The Self to be just as interesting (if not more) as the first issue. It has a great selection of book and film reviews, as well as interesting articles on abuse recovery and stress management. I particularly enjoyed the "veterans" article. Very interesting!!! I highly recommend this issue of RTS.
    crazypsychobooklover on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
    Recovering the Self: A Journal of Hope and HealingVolume II, Number 1January 2010Edited by: Ernest DempseyPublished by: Loving Healing PressISBN: 978-1-932690-83-5Recovering the Self: A Journal of Hope and Healing is the title of this quarterly journal created to explore the themes of recovery and healing through the use of various media. Each quarterly journal includes poetry, memoir, essays, fiction, psycho-education, humor and reviews. This specific issue covers topics that include recovery from an eating disorder, parenting, culture and ethnicity, abuse recovery, stress management, AIDS orphans and more. The contributors to this issue have a wide variety of life experience, education, outlooks and beliefs. I found each offering to be heartfelt, and all contained useful advice and insight. I learned something from each of the contributors, and my time reading was well and usefully spent. Submissions for future quarterly journals are accepted on an ongoing basis; and I look forward to reading future volumes of this well written journal. Yearly subscriptions are available, as well as purchase of individual issues. I think anyone with interest in psychology or simply any aspect of recovery would benefit from the variety of talented contributors. Something I find especially attractive about this journal is that it is not written with an eye towards just the professional reader, but anyone who is undergoing recovery from a trauma or impacted family members, coworkers or friends. They would gain useful insight and understanding.
    Pheonix on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
    Interesting book with some good tips. Took no time to read once I settled down and started it.
    wrmjr66 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
    This is not a book, but the first issue of a journal. As one would expect, the various entries are of various quality. Some items are scholarly in tone, while others are much more personal. The poetry and fiction are generally good, though there was nothing in those pages that are likely to be award winners. The number closes with a series of reviews of books and movies. These seemed generally well done, though since I haven't read or seen the works under review, I cannot really comment on how well they reviewed the works.The journal itself is professional looking. The cover is glossy with a full color painting on the front. Interior pages are printed on nice paper. There are few pictures or illustrations, and adding more might be a way of strengthening future numbers and volumes. Overall, it is a journal that shows some promise.
    TimFerris on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
    I love the open source/open space concept of this journal, which the editor expects to publish quarterly. It encompasses all the areas I think need more traffic in the public dialogue: recovery, transformation, hope, healing, forgiveness, awareness, perspective, inclusiveness, community, and love. In that it was assembled using the contributions of a cross-section of our neighbors, it has an uneven quality, but that's to be expected. It's a good attempt, a good collaboration.
    varske on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
    I made the mistake of reading the other reviews while I was waiting for it to arrive. But I agree it was not what I was expecting when i signed up for it. Nor is it clear what sort of a target audience it is aimed at. While a book of short articles by people who have recovered themselves, could be inspiring, I'm not sure it works as a journal, with repeated issues. I see there is now Vol. II, No 1 (strange numbering) issued in January 2010. It seems to me that there is a limit to the number of stories you can read at a time, even if dipped into now and then.My copy also came with "Love Each Day" billed "40 true inspirational stories". I could only read a few before the inspiration got lost on me.However, there have been times of my life, when life was more of a struggle for me, when I would have valued these stories more. And the recommendation of writing your own story is definitely a good one.
    teaching2learn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
    Recovering the Self is a collection of articles, poetry and other forms of short writing. The journal focused on personal tragedy and how different individuals dealt with problems. Some turned to God, some to friends and family and others sought comfort in medicinal form. There were a couple of pieces that I was truly amazed at! I wondered how they coped so well. If I were there shoes how would I have dealt? In one story a man loses his wife and almost his children to Genocide. Another article deals with forgiveness of someone who ended a loved ones life. The pieces covered almost every coping mechanism for stress such as anger, substance abuse, grief (depression) and hope. I didn¿t remember if denial appeared in any piece.I enjoyed reading this journal. I wished some of the articles were longer because it seems just I really got into it the piece was done. Many times I was left wondering ok how does the story end what happened next? I don¿t usually read journals but this wasn¿t a bad one to get into. I don¿t know if I would read the next volume simply because it is not my favorite genre. Even though it isn¿t my normal reading preference it was worth reading! Several times I was on the verge of crying. Some stories made me grateful for the life I have. I would recommend this journal to anyone suffering a tragedy. Maybe they would become inspired by a piece. The journal might also give them ideas how to deal with the circumstance at hand.
    soliloquies on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
    Slightly bemused by this journal. Outwardly it looks as though it will interesting and provide beneficial advice as to healing. Instead it is a hotchpotch of essays, fiction, poetry and reviews. It seems to have no 'audience', it doesn't truly cover healing (unless you find true life stories insightful), but neither is it aimed at an academical level. I was disappointed, but others may find this type of journal useful.
    kathieoc on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
    ISBN978-1-61599-048-1A feel good read!I found this book to be a wonderful potpourri of articles and subjects. ¿Recovering Thy Self¿ is a quarterly journal that explores various themes through essays, poetry, opinion, and sharing of self. The writings come from authors from all four corners of the world. This book has stories from various authors dealing with personal growth, relationship and family, trauma recovery, living with disabilities, short fiction, travel interviews, substance abuse, addiction, and recovery. The articles pertain to personal struggles ¿accepted, dealt with, and overcome. It shares the personal side of each author in very deep and meaningful ways. Some authors write of their own struggles, bringing a wonderful perspective to the subject, while others reflect on the struggles of others. This book incorporates their own personal journey and growth in a concise, well written fashion. I enjoyed the reflective aspect it brought. Each subject brings another level of depth and acknowledgement that we all have our own journey. The book is well designed and arranged so you can easily move from story to story. You can also read through it selecting topic, by topic of interest to you. Looking at the lives of others allows us to better look at ourselves. This book fosters human compassion and love. A wide variety of fact, fiction and emotion is available on every page. You can learn how to better understand and prevent spousal arguments to understanding how disasters lift the human spirit. Learn how assisting in the Katrina disaster changed eh life of one of the volunteers. Remarkable. Looking at the lives and problems of others truly helps us look at ourselves. It helps us find feelings, create opinions and reach deeper in to our own souls and lives. This book makes you feel more human, a kindred spirit of sorts. Sharing these pages lifts the human spirit and helps us better relate to one another. Healing brings hope and he who has hope has everything. This is a fun read that restores faith, especially in these hard, emotional and economic times. The authors are not only from around the world but encompass a wide spectrum of age groups and backgrounds. These are not only professional writers and therapists, but are written by just regular folks as well. This book brings human element for front and center. It¿s refreshing to have a resource to share and discuss with friends. I am looking forward to the next issue.I received a complimentary review copy.
    JanStone More than 1 year ago
    Recovering The Self: A Journal of Hope and Healing (Vol. II, No.1) (Paperback) Recovering the Self, a Journal of Hope and Healing, Vol. 11, No. 1 is an awesome quarterly literary journal from Ernest Dempsey for people who are struggling w/some life problem and looking for like-minded individuals and others who understand. Contributors come from around the world and from all kinds of specialities like psychologists and life coaches as well as nurses, poets, essayists and and people like you and me who have lived and learned. Each article is short but full of valuable insight. The art and the poetry add more than I can say. More people should know about this journal. It can help them be more comfortable in the knowledge that they aren't alone, and others share tough, scary challenges. I don't know if this approach exists anywhere else than in this quarterly journal. That's invaluable knowledge, and it can help change peoples' lives.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    reader170 More than 1 year ago
    "Recovering The Self: A Journal of Hope and Healing" Vol. II, No.3, July 2010 ISBN978-1-61599-048-1 I found this book to be a wonderful potpourri of articles and subjects. "Recovering Thy Self" is a quarterly journal that explores various themes through essays, poetry, opinion, and sharing of self. The writings come from authors from all four corners of the world. This book has stories from various authors dealing with personal growth, relationship and family, trauma recovery, living with disabilities, short fiction, travel interviews, substance abuse, addiction, and recovery. The articles pertain to personal struggles .accepted, dealt with, and overcome. It shares the personal side of each author in very deep and meaningful ways. Some authors write of their own struggles, bringing a wonderful perspective to the subject, while others reflect on the struggles of others. This book incorporates their own personal journey and growth in a concise, well written fashion. I enjoyed the reflective aspect it brought. Each subject brings another level of depth and acknowledgement that we all have our own journey. The book is well designed and arranged so you can easily move from story to story. You can also read through it selecting topic, by topic of interest to you. Looking at the lives of others allows us to better look at ourselves. This book fosters human compassion and love. A wide variety of fact, fiction and emotion is available on every page. You can learn how to better understand and prevent spousal arguments to understanding how disasters lift the human spirit. Learn how assisting in the Katrina disaster changed eh life of one of the volunteers. Remarkable. Looking at the lives and problems of others truly helps us look at ourselves. It helps us find feelings, create opinions and reach deeper in to our own souls and lives. This book makes you feel more human, a kindred spirit of sorts. Sharing these pages lifts the human spirit and helps us better relate to one another. Healing brings hope and he who has hope has everything. This is a fun read that restores faith, especially in these hard, emotional and economic times. The authors are not only from around the world but encompass a wide spectrum of age groups and backgrounds. These are not only professional writers and therapists, but are written by just regular folks as well. This book brings human element for front and center. It's refreshing to have a resource to share and discuss with friends. I am looking forward to the next issue. I received a complimentary review copy.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    crazypsychobooklover More than 1 year ago
    Recovering The Self: A Journal of Hope and Healing (Vol. 1, No.1) Author: Ernest Dempsey (Editor) Publisher: Loving Healing Press ISBN: 978-1-932690-09-5 This is the premier issue of Loving Healing Press' quarterly journal "Recovering The Self, A Journal of Hope and Healing. This excellent publication contains a wide variety of articles, poems, fiction, humor, book reviews and book excerpts. This information is provided by numerous well known authorities in the fields of psychology, metaphysics, social work and counseling. Specific works in the this volume include: Victims No More by Barbara Sinor, PhD; an article to inspire the reader to let go of past programming and thought processes and recreate life to reach the successes desired. Frank A. Gerbode, M.D., shares his professional insight into the theory of resilience and why some people seem to be more resilient when faced with trauma and/or stress. He discusses the use of Traumatic Incident Reduction (TIR) to work through the situation and build resilience. An article written by Sam Vaknin (author of 10 books about personality disorders and abuse in relationships) is entitled Sex, Gender and Personality Disorders. It takes an interesting look at gender identity and sexual preferences and whether thay have a specific genetic predisposition, along with a revealing look at the gender disparity found in diagnosing personality disorders. Interesting and insightful, with excellent quotes from key literature.. Dr. Janet Hall contributes the article "Helping Children Traumatized by Disaster" a well-done source of information to help children dealing with a variety of traumatic experiences. I look forward to reading additional volumes of Recovering The Self. This anthology truly offers much useful and thought-provoking information.
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