Red and the Wolf

Red and the Wolf

by E. A. Walker

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Product Details

BN ID: 2940046593136
Publisher: Two Moons Books
Publication date: 04/06/2015
Sold by: Smashwords
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 240 KB

About the Author

I took a B.A. in journalism from UCL and then worked from 1999 - 2008 in Sydney, Cape Town and back in London. Since then I have been working part-time and developing my writing skills - I hope. As a young reader I was inspired by the stories of great writers such as Andre Norton, Anne McCaffrey, Ursula K. LeGuin, C.J. Cherryh and J.K. Rowling. I wanted to create worlds like theirs, and characters as loveable and engaging as theirs. So I started writing stories in notebooks. Sharing these with friends showed me, painfully, that I had a lot to learn - but I just had to keep trying. I love Fantasy, and that is what I mostly write. But I also read, and write, Young Adult books, and most of my stories have at least a little romance in them. I go all gooey over a good love story, so I'm inclined to think that other readers feel the same. You can reach me at 77eawalker(atsign)gmail.com. If you are a reader of any of my books I would love to hear from you!

Customer Reviews

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Red and the Wolf 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
BrunoGon More than 1 year ago
As a story, Red and the Wolf is loosely associated with the Little Red Riding Hood fairy tale we all know, and it is a plain reminder that even the stories we grew up with can be rewritten into very interesting adult tales. I would say the author writes with a very poetic prose, but that might confuse those already familiar with what is known as prose poetry. Instead I should say that she has managed to create powerful imagery through her writing; simply put, the writing quality is a step above what most indie authors produce nowadays. The storyline itself gave me pause for some thought; as someone who has known only the modern version of the tale, I almost felt that a sacrilege had been committed. Some reading on the fairy tale and its origins, however, made it clear to me that many versions have existed over the centuries, including those that introduce a “werewolf” quality to the Big Bad Wolf. There are even versions where the wolf emerges victorious! Either way, I believe that Red and the Wolf is a tale well worth reading and recommending, not only due to the storyline itself but also for the pure enjoyment of professionally crafted prose. Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an objective and non-reciprocal review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love prose that has poetry in it, the kind that is rich and evocative and contains not a single over-used word or cliche. When you wrap that kind of language around a unique twist on a fairy tale, it makes for a quality read like this. Red and the Wolf has an old-world backdrop that sets it apart from a lot of other paranormal work in a good way, and at several points I really did forget the genre. It reminds me of elements of books like "The Historian"--snippets of the backdrop here even made me think of the settings of novels like Solokhov's "And Quiet Flows the Don." Plot-wise, this piece is refreshing in its approach to the Little Red Riding Hood story for sure, and that's great. There are plot elements that Walker could draw out even more boldly, I think, and given the richness of the prose, it could only be a benefit. All in all, a unique, enjoyable read from a gifted prosist (if that's a word). Would love to see her take on Hansel and Gretel! 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is not the version of Little Red Riding Hood you should read to your children, unless you want them to have nightmares or lose sleep. E.A. Walker takes us to a dark, cold, and grim retelling of the classic fairy tale, where all is not as it seems, or as we remember. When I finished reading this novella, it reminded me of Wuthering Heights, being a tale of two halves, in a desolate setting, with a healthy dose of the supernatural. I’d imagine, if this book was written in the Victorian period, it could sustain being much longer, but E.A. Walker keeps the pace and length measured for a modern audience. Stylistically, the writing is elaborate, also bringing to mind Victorian prose, and giving E.A. Walker the opportunity to dwell on details, and linger in specific moments. The principal characters are well drawn, their actions, and choices, for better or worse, convincing and credible - not your bulk standard fairy tale stereotypes by any extent of the imagination. Overall, an enjoyable read, and that’s what Counts… er... counts. Oh dear… spoilers.
marcsec More than 1 year ago
A fresh and original take on the Red Riding Hood fable, Red and the Wolf is a richly atmospheric story by a writer truly in command of their craft. Well edited and crafted, strong characters and a fast-moving plot make this a real treat. Watch for for some big surprises along the way as you experience this unique retelling of a familiar fable - recommended reading for a dark, stormy night!
Angel Berry More than 1 year ago
This was an extremely good story that borrowed certain aspects from the popular fairytale Little Red Riding Hood - for example, the red cape and wolves in the woods. But while there are some similarities, this is definitely a story of its own. I was not expecting things to turn out as they did. I thought this story was frickin' awesome. Short and sweet. I wish I could give it another star.
RayBear More than 1 year ago
“…an adult needs to be able to hear the truth, even when it has an unpleasant sound.” (Kindle Location 281). Vörö¿a wanted Juri from almost the moment she set eyes on him, but her Babushka had other plans. Sne¿ana claims that Vörö¿a is of noble birth and shouldn’t consort with the lowly villagers, especially the woodcutter, but Vörö¿a doesn’t listen. In secret, at least she thinks so, she meets with Juri and they make plans together. All in the town are wary of the two women in the forest, but Juri, until one event that will have them sympathizing with the young Vörö¿a. Can she truly leave her noble birth behind? This short story is based on Little Red Riding Hood, but it is very much its own tale and very different from the simple animated versions that abound in film. This story, though new, is told as if it is a tale retold, a legend of a small town near a wide and foreboding forest. E.A. Walker does an amazing job at carefully crafting her descriptions and keeping her consistent old world feel of the story. From the beginning Walker provides enough physical descriptions to set the scene and plunge the reader into Vörö¿a’s world. The characters are whole and alive in the imagination. It was very helpful to have the pronunciation chart at the start of the story and helped as I read for visualizing. As the story went on, I thought there were a few too many characters and it got a bit confusing. After reading the story a second time, I really was able to appreciate the bit of foreshadowing that was cleverly disguised. Disclaimer: I was given a free copy of this story in exchange for my honest review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love dark retellings of classic stories so naturally I enjoyed Red and the Wolf. It reminded me a lot of Red’s story in Once Upon a Time, but of course this version of Little Red Riding Hood has its’ own elements. Pros: It’s a short read with vivid, intricately written descriptions and I was engaged most of the time. I loved that Granny was not so much a sweet, elderly woman but actually a master swordfighter who wasn’t afraid to wound her grand-daughter in training. Cons: I felt like there was depth lurking beneath the surface of the plot, but the reader never got to delve into that depth. There were questions left hanging and so I never quite felt satisfied with the ending. The same is true for emotional depth. There were moments where I desperately wanted more emotional insight to the characters, but it wasn’t provided. In summary, the story was interesting, fun and vivid. It feels like a story with enormous potential. With a few tweaks, I think this could have blown me away. Rating: 3.5 stars Disclaimer: I was offered a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest, non-reciprocal, review.
RBarnard More than 1 year ago
"…an adult needs to be able to hear the truth, even when it has an unpleasant sound." (Kindle Location 281).  Vörö¿a wanted Juri from almost the moment she set eyes on him, but her Babushka had other plans. Sne¿ana claims that Vörö¿a is of noble birth and shouldn't consort with the lowly villagers, especially the woodcutter, but Vörö¿a doesn't listen. In secret, at least she thinks so, she meets with Juri and they make plans together. All in the town are wary of the two women in the forest, but Juri, until one event that will have them sympathizing with the young Vörö¿a. Can she truly leave her noble birth behind? This short story is based on Little Red Riding Hood, but it is very much its own tale and very different from the simple animated versions that abound in film. This story, though new, is told as if it is a tale retold, a legend of a small town near a wide and foreboding forest. E.A. Walker does an amazing job at carefully crafting her descriptions and keeping herconsistent old world feel of the story. From the beginning Walker provides enough physical descriptions to set the scene and plunge the reader into Vörö¿a's world.  The characters are whole and alive in the imagination. It was very helpful to have the pronunciation chart at the start of the story and helped as I read for visualizing. As the story went on, I thought there were a few too many characters and it got a bit confusing.  After reading the story a second time, I really was able to appreciate the bit of foreshadowing that was cleverly disguised.  Disclaimer: I was given a free copy of this story in exchange for my honest review.