Red Sky Over America: Ladies of Oberlin Book One

Red Sky Over America: Ladies of Oberlin Book One

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

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Overview

William and America confront evil, but will it costs them everything?

In 1857, America, the daughter of a slave owner, is an abolitionist and a student at Oberlin College, a school known for its radical ideas. America goes home to Kentucky during school break to confront her father about freeing his slaves.

America's classmate, William, goes to Kentucky to preach abolition to churches that condone slavery. America and William find themselves in the center of the approaching storm sweeping the nation and may not make it home to Ohio or live through the struggle.

Meet the Ladies of Oberlin, the causes they're willing to fight for, and the men who capture their hearts.

Red Sky Over America tackles the most turbulent time in history with thorough research and fascinating characters. Tamera Lynn Kraft has woven a tale about the evils of slavery that should never be forgotten. -- Mary Ellis, author of The Quaker and the Rebel, The Lady and the Officer, and The Last Heiress.

It's the middle of the 18th century, a troubled time in American history, when strong women find it difficult to find their place in society. Three women dare to fight against social injustices, but when they fall in love, things get complicated.

Three women roommates, graduates of Oberlin College, challenge society norms to do what is right even though it may cost them everything, including love. Oberlin College, considered radical at the time, was the only co-education, multi-racial college before the Civil War, and its graduates were involved in many progressive era issues including abolition, women’s suffrage, prohibition, and the missionary movement.

In Red Sky over America, in a nation on the brink of war, America confronts slavery and risks being alienated from her slave owning father. In Lost in the Storm, during the Civil War, Lavena challenges a profession ruled by men to become a war correspondent, but will she keep her job by destroying the man she loves? In The Aftermath, when Betsy's husband comes home from the war as an alcoholic, she uses unladylike tactics to fight against the evils of drink to save her marriage.

Meet the Ladies of Oberlin, the causes they're willing to fight for, and the men who capture their hearts.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781949564020
Publisher: Mt. Zion Ridge Press
Publication date: 09/01/2018
Series: Ladies of Oberlin , #1
Pages: 288
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

Tamera Lynn Kraft has always loved adventures. She loves to write historical fiction set in the United States because there are so many stories in American history. There are strong elements of faith, romance, suspense and adventure in her stories. She has received 2nd place in the NOCW contest, 3rd place TARA writer's contest, and is a finalist in the Frasier Writing Contest. Her newest novel, Red Sky Over America is Book 1 of the Ladies of Oberlin series.

Tamera been married for 39 years to the love of her life, Rick, and has two married adult children and three grandchildren. She has been a children's pastor for over 20 years. She is the leader of a ministry called Revival Fire for Kids where she mentors other children's leaders, teaches workshops, and is a children's ministry consultant and children's evangelist and has written children's church curriculum. She is a recipient of the 2007 National Children's Leaders Association Shepherd's Cup for lifetime achievement in children's ministry.

You can contact Tamera online at her website: http://tameralynnkraft.net

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Red Sky Over America (Ladies of Oberlin) 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
MrsTina42MR More than 1 year ago
Red Sky over America #1 Ladies of Oberlin by Tamera Lynn Kraft 1857 Oberlin, Ohio… With sensitively, Tamera Kraft weaves a story about a turbulent time in history. With extensive research that is evident on each page, this powerful story unfolds and the characters come to life. I enjoy reading historical Christian fiction, I always learn something new as I did reading this book. A captivating, powerful story. ~I received a copy of this book from the author/publisher (no monetary gain were exchanged), this is my honest review~
Mama_Cat More than 1 year ago
This is the best Christian historical novel I’ve read all year! From the beginning, I was fully engaged with the story and characters, especially the very likable America “Merry” Leighton, Joe and Ruth, and William. They, and their realistic struggles during pre-Civil War years are defined in such a way that I felt as if I were there. Using a real historical setting, some of its real people, and their teaching about the Lord and His Word further brings it alive. It is late 1857, and Merry is going home for school break. Her father is a slaveowner, and while he treats his slaves better than most, he still owns them. Aunt Ruth raised America after her mother died and is the only mother figure she has known. Uncle Joe is Ruth’s husband. Unbeknownst to Merry, her father sold Joe’s oldest son, Amos, and plans to sell Naomi soon, as many of their horses died during the summer and the mortgage is due. Also unknown to Merry, her father has all but promised her hand to Harland, a slaveowner who plans to run for senator in 1860. Colonel Beauregard Leighton may be low on funds, but his word can almost ensure Harland’s election. Merry feels the Lord’s is call in more than area. She attends Oberlin College, known for its ideas about slavery and women’s suffrage. She believes Oberlin is the best place for her to receive a degree that will fit her for mission work in China. She believes she is to go home for this break and tell her father how he needs to free his slaves, how slavery is a sin in the eyes of the Lord. On the train home, Brother William, a student whose anointed preaching she heard at college, sits next to her. He has felt drawn to her since she prayed with him about a year ago. He wonders if this is the woman to be his bride, as they have similar calls to the mission field and feelings about slavery. At least until he hears her speak to Joe. What comes next is where the rubber meets the road, each on their own path. Merry goes home and William goes to various churches as a visiting preacher. William learns that not all churches are what they seem, while some are very proactive with helping slaves. Merry is convicted of the plank in her own eye about slavery, more so after attending a special prayer meeting at her pastor’s. Her father is firm with his stand on slavery, even firmer on her match to Harland, who really creeps her out. She and William may share similar feelings for each other. She is in a quandary of how to honor her father, as Scripture states, and return to college, then the mission field. Her regular attendance at the special, private prayer meetings is also in question, and Harland is about to discover why. The author presented both sides of slavery from the characters’ point of view, as well as Merry’s concern for honoring her earthly father as well as her heavenly Father. Watching William as he went from one church to another was so enlightening! From beginning to end, this was a hard novel to set down. It is overall straightforward with a few breathtaking twists and turns! The end brought both tragedy and promises of hope, as well as knowledge that war was coming. This is a novel filled with faith and grace, clear descriptions, actual people at Oberlin, and symbolism at the start of one of the most tumultuous times in our nation’s history; I highly recommend it! From a grateful heart: I won a copy of this e-book from the author, and was not obligated to post a review.
ARS8 More than 1 year ago
Red Sky over America takes us to the year of 1857 when the country is being divided over the issue of slavery. America has been away from her Kentucky home for three years now studying at Oberlin College in Ohio. While there she has thoroughly gone over to the Abolitionist cause. Problem is, her father is a slave owner and pretty set in his ways. Deciding to return home for a time, America decides it is time to confront her father about setting his slaves free. However, things don’t go as she has planned and she realizes some things about herself. Returning home to try to convince her father of the right thing to do has opened her eyes to her own prejudices she must let go of as well. William is an abolitionist preacher and fellow student of America who is also traveling to Kentucky over break. He knows full well he is riding into a state with a message most don’t want to accept and he could possibly be hanged for his message. This is a gritty tale that shows how evil slavery is, how women were also considered as less, and how warped and twisted men can be over a cause that is not right. I was provided with a complimentary copy of this novel. I was not required to post a positive review and all views and opinions are my own.
Deana0326 More than 1 year ago
The book is a haunting look back in history when slaves were very prevalent. It was so hard to read how horrific they were treated. I can't imagine the terror they felt when they knew they were going to be beat. The author has done extensive research on this subject and it shows by the vivid picture she paints with her words. There were times I had tears rolling down my cheeks as I read about human beings being traded to work for nothing. America is one young woman that I would want to be friends with. Her determination to follow what God has placed in her heart was an example of true faith. She had such a heart to free slaves and her biggest challenge was her father. How do you go against your father and refuse to support him? America is a strong willed young woman who will risk everything to see her father's slaves freed. William is a man with a mission. He has set out to travel to different places and preach about how wrong it is to own slaves. There were times I'm sure he was fearful of what may happen when he stood before men who disagree with his beliefs. There was something that really stuck in my head and it made me look at this story with a heart that hurt for the unjust treatment of men, women and children of color. We are all made in the imagine of God yet during this time period that one sentence was erased from the minds of slave owners. When America (Merry) finds out about a secret movement to help slaves be free, she must decide if she is willing to help or turn the group in. The story is intense and realistic with each page growing with danger. I really liked how the author showed readers how much faith the characters had. Would it be hard to stand up for the truth if you knew you could be in danger of being killed? There were times in the story when I felt anger rise up in me. America's father was such a mean spirited man and his sternness overwhelmed me. Even though people said he treated his slaves better than most he still beat them. His treatment of his daughter bordered on control and I feared for America's safety. The author has written a story that is epic and depicts a time when the color of your skin determined your destiny by others. It is one of the best stories I've read about slavery and I appreciate the brutal honesty that the author wrote about a time in history that makes me grieve. " It's better to lose your life obeying God than pretend slavery doesn't exist and do nothing." I received a copy of this book from Celebrate Lit. The review is my own opinion.
Deana0326 More than 1 year ago
The book is a haunting look back in history when slaves were very prevalent. It was so hard to read how horrific they were treated. I can't imagine the terror they felt when they knew they were going to be beat. The author has done extensive research on this subject and it shows by the vivid picture she paints with her words. There were times I had tears rolling down my cheeks as I read about human beings being traded to work for nothing. America is one young woman that I would want to be friends with. Her determination to follow what God has placed in her heart was an example of true faith. She had such a heart to free slaves and her biggest challenge was her father. How do you go against your father and refuse to support him? America is a strong willed young woman who will risk everything to see her father's slaves freed. William is a man with a mission. He has set out to travel to different places and preach about how wrong it is to own slaves. There were times I'm sure he was fearful of what may happen when he stood before men who disagree with his beliefs. There was something that really stuck in my head and it made me look at this story with a heart that hurt for the unjust treatment of men, women and children of color. We are all made in the imagine of God yet during this time period that one sentence was erased from the minds of slave owners. When America (Merry) finds out about a secret movement to help slaves be free, she must decide if she is willing to help or turn the group in. The story is intense and realistic with each page growing with danger. I really liked how the author showed readers how much faith the characters had. Would it be hard to stand up for the truth if you knew you could be in danger of being killed? There were times in the story when I felt anger rise up in me. America's father was such a mean spirited man and his sternness overwhelmed me. Even though people said he treated his slaves better than most he still beat them. His treatment of his daughter bordered on control and I feared for America's safety. The author has written a story that is epic and depicts a time when the color of your skin determined your destiny by others. It is one of the best stories I've read about slavery and I appreciate the brutal honesty that the author wrote about a time in history that makes me grieve. " It's better to lose your life obeying God than pretend slavery doesn't exist and do nothing." I received a copy of this book from Celebrate Lit. The review is my own opinion.
Deana0326 More than 1 year ago
The book is a haunting look back in history when slaves were very prevalent. It was so hard to read how horrific they were treated. I can't imagine the terror they felt when they knew they were going to be beat. The author has done extensive research on this subject and it shows by the vivid picture she paints with her words. There were times I had tears rolling down my cheeks as I read about human beings being traded to work for nothing. America is one young woman that I would want to be friends with. Her determination to follow what God has placed in her heart was an example of true faith. She had such a heart to free slaves and her biggest challenge was her father. How do you go against your father and refuse to support him? America is a strong willed young woman who will risk everything to see her father's slaves freed. William is a man with a mission. He has set out to travel to different places and preach about how wrong it is to own slaves. There were times I'm sure he was fearful of what may happen when he stood before men who disagree with his beliefs. There was something that really stuck in my head and it made me look at this story with a heart that hurt for the unjust treatment of men, women and children of color. We are all made in the imagine of God yet during this time period that one sentence was erased from the minds of slave owners. When America (Merry) finds out about a secret movement to help slaves be free, she must decide if she is willing to help or turn the group in. The story is intense and realistic with each page growing with danger. I really liked how the author showed readers how much faith the characters had. Would it be hard to stand up for the truth if you knew you could be in danger of being killed? There were times in the story when I felt anger rise up in me. America's father was such a mean spirited man and his sternness overwhelmed me. Even though people said he treated his slaves better than most he still beat them. His treatment of his daughter bordered on control and I feared for America's safety. The author has written a story that is epic and depicts a time when the color of your skin determined your destiny by others. It is one of the best stories I've read about slavery and I appreciate the brutal honesty that the author wrote about a time in history that makes me grieve. " It's better to lose your life obeying God than pretend slavery doesn't exist and do nothing." I received a copy of this book from Celebrate Lit. The review is my own opinion.
Virginiaw More than 1 year ago
I so enjoyed this historical fiction book. I enjoyed reading about what happened in some parts of Kentucky before the civil war. It was also interesting to see what was happening at Oberlin College in Ohio. This really shows the way that slavery pulled families apart. That includes the slave families and the white families. I loved the characters and how each was portrayed. I received a copy of this book from Celebratelit for a fair and honest opinion that I gave of my own free will.
annelr More than 1 year ago
Red Sky over America by Tamera Lynn Kraft is an intense and emotional story set in the mid-1800s, just before the Civil War--the beginnings of a volatile time in our country when abolitionists were bravely beginning to speak up and act against the horrors of slavery. America (Merry) has been at college for three years and feels led to go home to Kentucky to confront her father about owning slaves. Her conviction that evil triumphs in the world because it is not confronted, brings unforeseen consequences. Will she tear her family apart? Will she put her own life on the line? The author has a vivid way with words and has written descriptive scenes that stir the reader's imagination. It is easy to tell that she has researched well the historical timeframe of the story and the heartwrenching subject of slavery. The story drew me in at the beginning and kept my interest throughout as it moves quickly and is infused with intense drama, emotional tension, and a sweet, but not untroubled romance. The main characters have depth and reality and their emotions, strengths, and foibles resonate well with readers. Red Sky over America is not a story for the faint of heart but it is a story of the very real struggles of courageous people with strong beliefs and sacrificial love. I received a complimentary copy of this book via CelebrateLit. A favorable review was not required and opinions are my own. This review is part of a CelebrateLit blog tour.
annelr More than 1 year ago
Red Sky over America by Tamera Lynn Kraft is an intense and emotional story set in the mid-1800s, just before the Civil War--the beginnings of a volatile time in our country when abolitionists were bravely beginning to speak up and act against the horrors of slavery. America (Merry) has been at college for three years and feels led to go home to Kentucky to confront her father about owning slaves. Her conviction that evil triumphs in the world because it is not confronted, brings unforeseen consequences. Will she tear her family apart? Will she put her own life on the line? The author has a vivid way with words and has written descriptive scenes that stir the reader's imagination. It is easy to tell that she has researched well the historical timeframe of the story and the heartwrenching subject of slavery. The story drew me in at the beginning and kept my interest throughout as it moves quickly and is infused with intense drama, emotional tension, and a sweet, but not untroubled romance. The main characters have depth and reality and their emotions, strengths, and foibles resonate well with readers. Red Sky over America is not a story for the faint of heart but it is a story of the very real struggles of courageous people with strong beliefs and sacrificial love. I received a complimentary copy of this book via CelebrateLit. A favorable review was not required and opinions are my own. This review is part of a CelebrateLit blog tour.
Adriann Harris More than 1 year ago
I have read many historical stories about the south, their plantations, slaves, and way of live, but never one so vivid as Red Sky Over America. Tamera brought to life a very execrable time in our history with her realistic memorable writing. This story haunted me. To think that one human being could do this to another and think that it was right in the eyes of god sickened me. There were times that I wanted to look away but couldn’t. Tamera first introduces us to America (Merry) Leighton, the daughter of a slave owner from Kentucky, who is attending Oberlin College in Ohio founded in 1833 by John Jay Shipherd and Philo Stewart. Oberlin is the oldest coeducational liberal arts college in the United States and the second oldest continuously operating coeducational institute of higher learning in the world. The town of Oberlin itself was one of the crucial stops along the Underground Railroad. It is here where America is brought into the light that her family’s way of life goes against God’s teaching. Her classmate, William Woods, goes to Kentucky during winter break risking his life to preach against slavery. Back then even men of faith were hung for speaking out against slavery. We are witnesses to their separate stories and personal struggles. Tamera brings them together as they become champions freeing slaves. I have had the good fortune of reading all of Tamera Kraft’s works. Her growth as a writer is astounding and I applaud her for writing this story that is not for those that are weak or like their stories sugar coated. She has written a realistic believable story filled with characters of depth. What a fantastic start to a series. I received a complimentary copy of this book as part of the author’s Celebrate Lit book tour. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
MelissaF More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. I am so excited that this is the first book in a series! This whole plot was very intriguing. I loved America’s heart to help the slaves and Williams as well. I couldn’t wait to see how these two would find their way back together. The sad part is I’m sure a lot of what I read actually did happen. I can’t imagine watching someone treat another human being the way it is described here, but it happened. If you enjoy historical romance with some grit I highly recommend this one. A copy of this book was given to me through the Celebrate Lit Team. All opinions are my own.
cdscotton More than 1 year ago
Red Sky Over America is the first book I’ve read by Tamera Lynn Kraft and is the first book in the Ladies of Oberlin series. And it definitely won’t be the last! Ms. Kraft has written an excellent story about the years before the American Civil War, seen through the eyes of two young abolitionists: America, the daughter of a slave owner, and William, a minister. I was excited to read this book as it is hard to find stories about the years just prior to the Civil War, and it does not disappoint! America Leighton is our main character, and she is a great one. She struggles with trusting God, her belief that slavery is wrong, and her love for her father, who sees nothing wrong with slavery. The family dynamics that Ms. Kraft creates are handled well. We often find ourselves not believing the same way as our families and that causes friction, as it does here between America and her father. William Woods is the other main character, and I will admit I struggled to like him at first. In one of their first scenes together, he is judgmental toward America because she doesn’t behave how he expected when interacting with two of her family’s slaves. Over the course of the book, however, we see William’s deep commitment to abolition, his faith, and his calling as an overseas missionary, and I liked him more as the book continued. Trying to control his daughter, Colonel Leighton arranges a suitor for her, a local mill owner. America reluctantly agrees to the courtship despite the fact he owns slaves, as he promises he will free them if they are married. This is where she struggles between her overseas missionary calling and her abolitionist views, because she believes him. Needles to say, there is a lot more to Harland than meets the eye and I feel this plotline was settled satisfactorily. Though the writing is simplistic at times, this story is engaging and well-researched. I was so engrossed in the story I hardly stopped reading to take notes! Red Sky Over America is not an easy book to read, as there are detailed descriptions of beatings and violence against slaves and allusions to rape. This book has a wonderful balance of romance, suspense, and Christian themes. I appreciated America’s struggle between her faith, her family and what she’d known growing up, and what is morally right. I give Red Sky Over America 4/5 stars and recommend it to anyone interested in learning more about this time frame just before the Civil War. **I received a complimentary copy of this book from the author through CelebrateLit. All opinions are my own.**
Mar-J More than 1 year ago
Red Sky over America is a riveting novel set in 1857 with history and events brought to life. America (Merry) Leighton and William Woods life had similarities along with differences in their upbringing when they meet at Oberlin College in Ohio. They traveled to Kentucky together but encountered more than they had expected with their beliefs and desire to end slavery. Merry return to Kentucky came with disappointment, unrealistic expectation from her father along with finding a way to assist other Christians in giving slaves their freedom from Kentucky into Ohio. William’s preaching schedule met with opposition as even some ministers were supporting slavery and benefited in undesirable ways with their female slaves. The descriptive vivid details of oppositions from non-abolitionist, secrets, beatings and the work of the abolitionist risking their lives for slaves kept the pages turning. When William leaves Merry to travel to another church to preach he felt forsaken. Then a telegram reached him that pleaded for him to return as Merry’s life was in jeopardy with an impending engagement to a slave owner and severe sickness. Will further delays and dangers lurk William and cost lives of worthy individuals before he arrived? Readers of historical fiction will want to read Red Sky over America, book one in Kraft’s new series, Ladies of Oberlin, set during a difficult time in America history. I received a complimentary e-book from the author. I was not required to write a positive review but have expressed my own sincere thoughts.
MeezCarrie More than 1 year ago
Red Sky Over America deals with a tumultuous time in our nation’s history. It was a time when even men and women of faith were blinded to God’s heart. Yet it was also a time when a small group of men and women demonstrated great courage and sacrificial love in the face of great evil. Both sorts of people play important roles in Kraft’s newest novel, a story which is eye-opening and heartbreaking even with pockets of hope woven throughout. Here is where I need to admit that I never really warmed up to either of the protagonists – William and America. But here is where I assure you that the story still impacted me profoundly. In fact, I’m still processing a lot of the scenes, as well as some of the history I gleaned. For instance, learning that Kentucky (my state) bought and sold more slaves than any other state in the Union has led me to do some more research after I finished reading. The attitudes described in this story – of professing Christians toward slaves and free people of color – deeply grieved my heart. I can’t even think of an adjective strong enough to express how warped they were. At the same time, it serves as a sobering reminder of how absolutely (and stubbornly) blinded people can become to the truth, to the point that when confronted with God’s Word they resort to violence instead of repentance. In the middle of the heavy reality of slavery and oppression during that time in our history, Kraft also weaves in stories of people who boldly preached God’s truth and fought to “set at liberty them that are bruised” (Luke 4:18). People who risked everything – even their own families – to stand up to the oppressors and help slaves escape to freedom. “Evil triumphs in this world because we don’t confront it.” The characters in Red Sky Over America who confronted the evil around them are both encouraging and inspiring, even (especially?) in today’s world. Bottom Line: Red Sky Over America is sobering and hopeful, all at once. It also sets the stage nicely for the rest of the series, hooking readers into the broader picture and leaving them deeply invested in that outcome. While I never really liked either William or America, feeling like they both needed to do a great deal of maturing, I also acknowledge that they both demonstrated substantial character growth as the novel progressed. This is a story that will linger with me for a long time, and I’m looking forward to the next book in the series! (I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book)
MaureenST More than 1 year ago
Right from the beginning of this book I could feel the hopelessness of the people caught in slavery, treated horribly, and with your heart in your throat you want to do something. The author has place this injustice on the heart of her main character America, a young woman raised to have slaves, her father’s lively hood depends on it. Put in her path is a fellow student at Oberlin College, and a gifted preacher, with a heart for missionary work, and a staunch abolitionist. The author’s words placed me right in the midst of the abolition movement, and places faces on those who go about helping their fellowman. We meet those who are wolves in sheep’s clothing, a preacher spouting that people of color do not have souls, and then he twists the bible to support his sins. What a powerful story, broken families, both slave and owners, all with different views, and through it all we hope that America and her father will take off their blinders, they sure are given enough hints. A book that everyone should read, and after the final page is turned it will linger with you. I received this book though Lit Fuse Publicity Book Tours, and was not required to give a positive review.
Becky J Miller More than 1 year ago
Consider being the daughter of a Kentucky slave owner and coming to the knowledge that what you’ve known your entire life is absolutely and morally wrong. How does one cope with personal convictions when they defy familial norms? It’s 1857 and America Leighton finds herself in this exact situation. Three years away at radical Oberlin College in Ohio has convinced America that her family’s way of life could be completely wrong. Tamera Lynn Kraft’s Red Sky Over America centers on this very sensitive subject. How does one walk out the gospel when that gospel requires defying everything you’ve known to be true? Not only does America find herself in direct confrontation with her father whom she dearly loves, but also struggling with the decision of whether to spend her life with the man whom her father deems fit, or the man whom America has secretly fallen for. Kraft grants the slave characters in her book intelligence, compassion and great depth of personality, attributes not often seen in novels dealing with slavery. Readers will find themselves filled with compassion for the plight of those trapped in the horrors of slavery, while also hoping those holding them hostage will eventually come to see the error of their ways. The character Harland Boidae adds a bit of a devilish twist as readers strive to determine whether his motives are sincere. Red Sky Over America is certainly a story worth reading. ***A complimentary copy of this book was provided by the publisher. This review contains my own thoughts and opinions.
Phyllis_H More than 1 year ago
If you have ever wondered what it was like to be caught up in the issue of slavery before the Civil War, this book is for you. Author Tamera Lynn Kraft tells this story from multiple perspectives giving a wide range of opinions and the reasoning behind them. Though the story is primarily told from America’s and William’s viewpoints, there are small sections told from the perspective of one of the slaves and of a slave owner. The characters were richly developed and their motivations were very clear. Both America and William made some mistakes and misunderstood each other, despite having good intentions, which made them perfect for the story. “Seeing” firsthand what it was like in Kentucky at this time, and the various struggles that everyone faced related to survival and slavery was very interesting. The story was a rich adventure and while it wasn’t quite one that I couldn’t put down, it kept my interest to the very end. Although it is not described in detail, the story does talk about the reprehensible treatment of some female slaves by their male masters as well as the general cruelty to all the slaves, so I would be cautious about giving this book to a younger reader. There is other violence as well. This review was originally posted on AmongTheReads.net
AnnE42 More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed other books I have read by this author, and I really did enjoy this one. This is a story that transports the reader into the events occurring during the 1850's in the state of Kentucky and the resulting turmoil that occurred during that time of history. I was certainly pulled into America's story from the first pages as she dealt with the turmoil in her life as she stood firm in her beliefs as an abolitionist and was placed in the position of standing against her father who was a slave owner. This is an emotional and drama filled story with outstanding characters that I didn't want to put down. I was privileged to receive an advance copy of this book from the author. A positive review was not required. The opinions are expressed are my own, and this is a wonderful book that I definitely recommend.
vics49548 More than 1 year ago
This book will keep you flipping pages as fast as you can. Set in pre-civil war Kentucky, Author Tamera Kraft does not gloss over what happened during that era. Slavery was real and ugly, and that is not concealed. Spies, deception, hearts turned to the truth, and the Underground Railroad make this story a thrilling read. I did find this book difficult to read at times. I would rather those things had never occurred. Because Kraft has done intense research, she is able to paint a vivid picture of what would have been happening and it’s not pretty. Yet this story tells a tale of truth and redemption, also, and is very inspiring. I truly recommend you read Red Sky Over America. I received a complimentary copy of this book but was not required to leave a review.
MelissaGH More than 1 year ago
Powerful and emotional story dealing with a very important topic. The first paragraph drew me in and I couldn't put the book down. When people have strong opinions about an issue and your opinion is different, how do you deal with the struggles and tension? Read this story and learn how staying with her convictions, America finds her way in life and also have the opportunity for true love. Another great story by Tamera Lynn Kraft.