Red Star Rogue: The Untold Story of a Soviet Sumbarine's Nuclear Strike Attempt on the U.S.

Red Star Rogue: The Untold Story of a Soviet Sumbarine's Nuclear Strike Attempt on the U.S.

by Kenneth Sewell, Clint Richmond
3.9 23

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Red Star Rogue: The Untold Story of a Soviet Sumbarine's Nuclear Strike Attempt on the U.S. 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a non-stop read! The power we, the people, give our governments requires great trust. Sadly, those who fail to understand world events elect politocians who would fail this great Nation! The research of this subject is right up there akin to Blind Mans Bluff.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I founx this an interesting read. A lot of good information I was not previously aware of on the K-129. The author became repetative on some of the narrative in the book though.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found that this book filled in a lot of blanks of what happened and why it happened. Power can corrupt and checks and balances are part of our heritage. It makes one wonder what else is hidden from us.
kamas716 More than 1 year ago
This is the (purported) true story of the sinking and salvage of a Soviet missile sub. Having read A Matter Of Risk: The Incredible Inside Story Of The Cia's Hughes Glomar Explorer Mission To Raise A Russian Submarine many years ago, and also having read about it in Blind Man's Bluff: The Untold Story of American Submarine Espionage I was interested in this story. I remember seeing promo's about the Hughes Glomar Explorer in science class when I was a kid and we talked about deep sea mining. The fact that it was all just a cover up for a secret salvage operation just makes the story all the more tantalizing. The information presented here is EXTREMELY interesting, and he makes a good case for his version of events. Unfortunately, I don't know if we'll ever get the full story of exactly what happened with that sub. Did it try to launch a nuclear missile at Hawaii, and draw the US into a war by framing China for it? Was the whole submarine brought to the surface? How much actual information was able to be gleaned from the salvage?
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Having retired from the Navy several years ago, I found the book to be absolutely fascinating. It put several things into clearer perspective and is invaluable as we continue to learn from history and chart our future for world peace.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For students of Cold War history, the tale of sub K-129 told in Sewell's Red Star Rogue should be required reading. The fallout from the K-129's final mission heavily influenced both Eastern and Western foreign policy and international relations for decades. Sewell goes beyond explaining the K-129's chilling story to further describe how Soviet and U.S. leaders fit the K-129 into the bigger picture of Cold War intrigue. While many TV documentaries and other books refer to the not-so-secret mission of the Hughes Glomar Explorer - none of these sources ever spent any time explaining the significance of the Russian sub that functioned as the ship's target. Sewell's book finally provides a worthy description of why the sub at the center of that mission was so critical to U.S. interests.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. It helps make sense out of many events taking place at the time. If true, this planet was way too close to nuclear destruction.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Extraordinary account and if true (it probably is) this has major implications for today's understanding of and the proper response to the issue of nuclear proliferation in the context of the current multilateral negotiations with Iran and North Korea. The civilized nations of the world simply cannot permit this sort of crime to ever happen again.
Guest More than 1 year ago
At first a compelling but soon unbelievable account of K-129, the Soviet sub whose 1968 loss spurred ¿Project Jennifer¿ salvage endeavor involving ¿Glomar Explorer¿. The authors claim 1) K-129 had been commandeered on the orders of high-ranking Kremlin ideologues to launch her missiles against Hawaii and trigger an American-Chinese war and 2)contrary to reports that ¿Jennifer¿ salvaged only part of K-129, the project was completely successful. ¿Rogue¿ appears well-documented, but few-if-any sources corroborate the authors¿ points ¿ the authors actually spend more time repudiating others claims than substantiating their own, which are themselves nonsensical. The authors base their ¿hijack/attack¿ theory on the presence of about 11 extra men whose existence the authors never corroborate (and given that these men were supposed to have been placed by Politburo, the authors have a built-in explanation that any corroborative records could have easily been altered or destroyed.) The authors claim that the plot was intended to frame Red China, but that would require that the attack appear to be the work of the Chinese. Red China lacked any real SLBM capability until (at the earliest) the 1980¿s, and certainly none of their weapons had the megaton-yield of the warheads on K-129. The authors offer nothing that would have led anybody to believe that K-129 was anything other than a Soviet sub, with a Soviet crew and uniquely identifiable Soviet weapons. The authors claim that K-129 was sunk when the hijacking crewmen incorrectly bypassed launch safeguards and exploded one of the ship¿s missiles - but also suggest that the hijackers were special KGB troops who had access to nuclear weapons, raising the question of why such hijackers would need to bypass anything, or why such a possibility (with its risk of exposure) hadn¿t been factored into by the plotters. While making a good case for a missile explosion, the author¿s leap to missile-launch isn¿t supported ¿ undermined by the Soviet record of missile disasters. (A 1961 missile accident killed about 100 people include a red army Marshal, the Soviet moon-landing effort was routinely hamstrung by missile failure Submarine K-219 in 1986 sunk after a fire traced to a missile tube, but is never considered here.) The authors insist that America succeeded in raising the entire hulk of -129, desperate to have some bargaining chip against the Soviets. However, according to the authors, the Americans then desperately and inexplicably hide their prize ¿ likely cutting the sub up for scrap, as if the US had suddenly decided they were more scared to admit they found the sub than the Soviets were to have lost it. These are only the main sticking points of a book that puts about as many demands on your suspension of disbelief as ¿The Philadelphia Experiment¿, one that seems to gain ground mostly on the eagerness of readers to instinctively disbelieve whatever is official or accepted or mainstream, no matter how unreasonable the alternative is.