Redheart

Redheart

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780983108672
Publisher: Seventh Star Press
Publication date: 03/16/2011
Pages: 294
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.62(d)

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Redheart 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
MadMooseMama on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Redheart is book one of The Leland Dragon Series.Once dragons and humans worked in harmony to secure peace upon the lands. However, all good things come to an end when the humans begin to betray the dragons. Raping the land of all its resources and leaving blackened husks in their wake, the humans want more and the dragons have had enough. Enter the manipulation of Fordon Blackclaw, Dragon council leader, whose only reason for breathing is to incorporate war upon the lands.Kallon Redheart is the last of his kind, after witnessing the murder of his parents, he goes into seclusion, turning his back on his fellow dragons and disappearing into obscurity. Riza Diantus is a young lady who has had enough of abuse at home and decides to run away and begin her own life. Before she gets far, however, she is almost raped, but is saved by Kallon, who happened to be flying by at the time.Jastin Artimage is a dragon hunter for hire. He has come to Leland province to ensure that war breaks out amongst the dragons and the humans. His agenda is being directed by other parties and his will isn't truly his own, other than his immense hatred of all things dragon.Together they are drawn into a web of deceit where only the strong survive.I found this novel to be quite mesmerizing! I really enjoyed the characters and found it quite interesting to read the book from a dragon's point of view. The novel is told in third person by many of the characters involved and you just cannot help but want to continue reading. All the characters are believable as is the plot, and the flow only becomes a bit choppy near the end of the novel.The friendship between human Riza and dragon Kallon was enjoyable to watch unfold. I must say that the ending though a bit predictable, there were very few ways for it to go, was very well written, and wasn't a disappointment. The scenery was extremely stimulating and the narrative prose had just the right blend of adjectives and imagery. The hidden agenda with Jastin added just the right touch of mystery and the reader is never sure where Jastin's actions are going to lead him.I did have a small problem with some of the flow, like I mentioned, there was one point where Jastin is climbing a mountain, following a trail of blood, but he shouldn't have been able to do that, for it was mentioned that the injured party made great pains NOT to lead anyone back to their hiding place, so I don't know how Jastin found said blood trail leading him to where it did! They were already healed by the time they ended up in the hiding place for Jastin to "find". There were one or two other places that this occurred but I don't think its too much of a hindrance with the read.Redheart is a real page turner, author Jackie Gamber has done a wonderful job with a great back story, strong back characters and has just the right amount of humour and horror mixed in~!! I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys fantasy novels involving dragons, the book often reminded me of some of our Dungeons & Dragons games, I could almost hear the die rolling~!! I am truly looking forward to the next book in The Leland Dragon series~!!
Booklady123 on LibraryThing 10 months ago
I received a copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review.From the back of the book:"Enter the lands of Leland Province, where dragon and human societies have long dwelled side by side. Superstitions rise sharply, as a sever drought strips the land of its bounty, providing fertile ground for the darker ambitions of Fordon Blackclaw, Dragon Council Leader, who seeks to subdue humans or wipe them off the face of the land.As the shadow of danger creeps across Leland Province, a young dragon named Kallon Redheart, who has turned his back on dragons and humans alike, comes into an unexpected friendship. Riza Diantus is a young woman whos dreams can no longer be contained by the narrow confines of her village, and when she finds herself in peril, Kallon is the only one with the power to save here. Yet to do so means he must confront his past, and embrace a future he stopped believing in."I've been a fan of dragon books ever since my sweet husband introduced me to Anne McCaffrey's Dragons of Pern series shortly before we got married. For our first anniversary he even bought me a dragon. So I was excited to find a new young adult series about dragons. What I liked about the book: I liked that this was a young adult book about fantasy creatures that were not werewolves, vampires or fallen angels. It's a well written story about dragons verses humans and good verses bad. The fact that both sides have plenty of both makes for an engaging story. It's a love story, a rather different one - I won't say too much as I don't want to give anything away. The ending was very creative. When it looked as though all was lost, Gamber pulled off an ending that I did not see coming. It was a wonderful solution.What I didn't like about the book: The story is engaging, but there were times I felt a little lost. I would have liked to have a little more of the history between the dragons and humans. Since this is the first of a trilogy, I'm guessing Gambler will reveal more in the upcoming books.Overall this was a very enjoyable read. I highly recommend it for anyone who enjoys stories about magic and dragons.
ilikethesebooks on LibraryThing 10 months ago
There have been an increase in "dragon" books in YA recently, such as Firelight and Flying Blind, two books I really enjoyed. So the idea of another dragon book seemed appealing. Unfortunately, Redheart and I just did not mix well. Or at all really. Redheart is not like the "dragon" books I was referring too. That's okay, being different is fine - sometimes great. In this novel, the dragons are actually dragons, not shape shifters. That seemed kind of cool to me, but the logistics just seemed too unrealistic, even for a fantasy book. I mean, the dragons were writing and carrying objects, living in palaces, etc. and I just didn't see how any of that could be possible - even if dragons did exist. This might have been okay if it didn't take me so long to get into the book. It wasn't until I was more than halfway through that the pace started to pick up and I wanted to know how the book ended. I wasn't really excited with the romance of this book, but I was happy to see where it went (took a bit of a Shrek turn - you'll get it if you've read it). I'm not going to tear this book apart - we just did not match up. If you are a fan of dragon books, like real dragon books, and medieval type magic, you'll probably be a better fit for this novel than I was.
lesleydawn on LibraryThing 10 months ago
This was a romantic story about a girl who was searching for a life beyond the village she grew up in a dragon who had become a stranger to his own kind. It was sweet with just enough edge to keep you wanting more. I can't wait to pick up the next book in the series.
RJ_Sullivan More than 1 year ago
REDHEART by Jackie Gamber was this summer's novel I read to my children most evenings. At 50 chapters, not being able to read every night, the engaging kid-friendly fantasy made for many memorable evenings as we took in the next chapter in the adventures of Kallon, the moody red dragon, Riza, the human determined to be his friend even if it kills her (and quite often it nearly does), and Jastin Armitage, the misguided mercenary who wants to save Riza from herself, even if it's for his own purposes. Kallon is a dragon with many secrets--the last of the reds, the reader is let in on his past slowly, only as Riza breaks him down and peels away his defenses through time and trust. We learn the terrible tragedy of his parents, his status with a dragon council which which rules the dragon citizens that co-exist in an uneasy peace with humanity, and the dastardly plots of council leader Blackclaw and how he plans to usurp the council's purpose to his own ends. It's difficult to weave political intrigue into a novel partly aimed at younger kids, and it made for interesting side discussion as Daddy explained what a town council does in real life, but the novel succeeds in not getting too bogged down in the details. The characters provide the real thrust of the story. There's Kallon, who the reader most wants to like--he's a red dragon, how cool is that--who doesn't want to be around others and just wants to be left alone. Riza, a human runaway rescued by Kallon in the first chapter of the book, does her best to break through. Her frustrations are the reader's frustrations, and these parts of the book work best. Jastin is the toughest sell in this book. He's not particularly likeable, he often makes wrong choices, and often sets himself directly at odds with the goals of the other characters. At the same time, he is a continuing character whose story has not been entirely told. The plot is solid. The characters are solid. The humor works. The surprises surprise, particularly the big surprise at the end. I must say, I did NOT see that coming. My nitpicks, and I do have a couple, are minor. For one, (and this might be unique to the problem of reading the story aloud to others) the author needed to add more dialog tags in her prose, particularly in scenes with multiple characters in the room. Quite often, reading aloud, I found myself using my "Kallon" voice for three lines of dialog, only to get to the end of the line and read "said Riza." Oh, whoops! Had this only happened a time or two, I would not consider this mentioning, but it happened several times while I read it aloud. So if you're reading out loud like me, be prepared to scan ahead during the dialog, because it's not always clear who is speaking. Also, at least for little kids, the book ran about two chapters too long. The wrapup chapters, at least as far as my children were concerned, didn't really convey a lot of new or needed information. So these are quibbles. And I hear from good authority that SELA, the direct sequel, is a huge step forward from REDHEART. What I can tell you for sure is that my kids and I are anxious to start it tonight. Highly recommended.
RobinBlankenship More than 1 year ago
First I want to say that I loved that this is a Fantasy book written by a woman with a believable female character. She was strong and weak and loving and snippy when she needs to be. Riza was such a dynamic but believable character and I love seeing that in a Fantasy book when so many falter when writing female characters. What else did I love about this book? Yes you guessed it, Dragons. They were amazing. I loved being in the dragon's world. The descriptions of the dragons were amazing. They were so descriptive. I literally wanted to reach out and touch their scales and go flying. Above all this is a story of friendship, love, heartache, loss and finding your way. Kallon and Riza were both lost when they found each other. This book shows how given the right path anyone can change for the better. People (and Dragons)can learn to forgive, love again, trust and find their place in the world. The connection between Riza and Kallon is wonderful. They are both in a place of confusion and mistrust and loss and finding each other when they did set them on the path to healing. The beauty of this book is not only is it fantasy with fighting and dragons and magic but it has a great story of relationships and characters. All diverse and all with their own tales to tell. Jastin is as dark and mysterious as he lost and alone. He is also a rich complex character. The climax was both rewarding and beautiful. It was one of those scenes that made tears appear as well as a smile. It was a stunning twist that was just wonderful. There is intrigue, drama, twists and turns and the author did a wonderful job inviting us in to this worlds and showing us it's beauty as well as the ugly parts. I can not wait to continue the tale in the next book. This book is great for any age if you can read read it. My eleven year old was just as interested in the book as I was. Recommended for any age.
Heavensent1 More than 1 year ago
Redheart is book one of The Leland Dragon Series. Once dragons and humans worked in harmony to secure peace upon the lands. However, all good things come to an end when the humans begin to betray the dragons. Raping the land of all its resources and leaving blackened husks in their wake, the humans want more and the dragons have had enough. Enter the manipulation of Fordon Blackclaw, Dragon council leader, whose only reason for breathing is to incorporate war upon the lands. Kallon Redheart is the last of his kind, after witnessing the murder of his parents, he goes into seclusion, turning his back on his fellow dragons and disappearing into obscurity. Riza Diantus is a young lady who has had enough of abuse at home and decides to run away and begin her own life. Before she gets far, however, she is almost raped, but is saved by Kallon, who happened to be flying by at the time. Jastin Artimage is a dragon hunter for hire. He has come to Leland province to ensure that war breaks out amongst the dragons and the humans. His agenda is being directed by other parties and his will isn't truly his own, other than his immense hatred of all things dragon. Together they are drawn into a web of deceit where only the strong survive. I found this novel to be quite mesmerizing! I really enjoyed the characters and found it quite interesting to read the book from a dragon's point of view. The novel is told in third person by many of the characters involved and you just cannot help but want to continue reading. All the characters are believable as is the plot, and the flow only becomes a bit choppy near the end of the novel. The friendship between human Riza and dragon Kallon was enjoyable to watch unfold. I must say that the ending though a bit predictable, there were very few ways for it to go, was very well written, and wasn't a disappointment. The scenery was extremely stimulating and the narrative prose had just the right blend of adjectives and imagery. The hidden agenda with Jastin added just the right touch of mystery and the reader is never sure where Jastin's actions are going to lead him. I did have a small problem with some of the flow, like I mentioned, there was one point where Jastin is climbing a mountain, following a trail of blood, but he shouldn't have been able to do that, for it was mentioned that the injured party made great pains NOT to lead anyone back to their hiding place, so I don't know how Jastin found said blood trail leading him to where it did! They were already healed by the time they ended up in the hiding place for Jastin to "find". There were one or two other places that this occurred but I don't think its too much of a hindrance with the read. Redheart is a real page turner, author Jackie Gamber has done a wonderful job with a great back story, strong back characters and has just the right amount of humour and horror mixed in~!! I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys fantasy novels involving dragons, the book often reminded me of some of our Dungeons & Dragons games, I could almost hear the die rolling~!! I am truly looking forward to the next book in The Leland Dragon series~!!
SheilaDeeth More than 1 year ago
Book one of the Leland Dragon series, Jackie Gamber's Redheart imagines an intriguing world of humans and dragons, medieval in feel yet almost modern in the character of changing climate and shadows of fear. Dragons and humans have lived side by side for centuries, but superstition overwhelms memory and common sense all too easily gives way to greed as resources become scarce. The young dragon Kallon Redheart lives apart from his community, rejecting any obligations due to history and struggling to find meaning in life. Meanwhile the human girl, Riza, is fleeing her own community and obligations, rejecting a safe planned future (and marriage) in favor of her dreams. While villagers hire dragon-slayers and dragons plot genocide, chatty Riza and morose Kallon slowly fall into an unlikely friendship that promises danger and hope. The dialog is delightful in this young adult novel and carries the scenes and emotions very effectively. The point of view of dragon protagonist is nicely conveyed, giving a pleasing feel for changes in size, background and perception. And the story behind Kallon's sorrow is revealed with good timing as Riza falls into greater danger. Riza's stubborn independence matches Kallon's delightfully and they make intriguing protagonists. Themes of friendship, honor, duty, love and independence are nicely blended into the novel. Many questions are answered by the final page, giving a pleasing feel of completeness to the tale. But many more questions are raised leaving readers ready and waiting for a sequel. Redheart is a pleasing fantasy with intriguing medieval setting, fun characters, good dialog, happy coincidences and fast-flowing story for readers from middle-grade up. Disclosure: I received a copy of this novel from Seventh Star Press in exchange for an honest review.
Read_A_Book More than 1 year ago
I couldn't be happier to state that I just loved this book! Gamber is a very talented writer, combining beautiful prose with an intriguing story about a world in which dragons and humans co-exist, though not harmoniously anymore. I was intrigued from the very first chapter, and absolutely adored the narrative style Gamber employs in her writing, as the third person narration allows four separate stories to run simultaneously, leading up to their interconnections and beyond. I really love that Gamber creates suspense and ends each chapter with a cliffhanger, making it impossible for the reader to put the book down. Yet, the next chapter adds no respite as it changes to the story of another character, creating anticipation and more cliffhangers before the original character is brought back to the forefront. It's sheer genius-I read the entire novel in one sitting as I was that enamored with the characters and their plights; there was never any down time, and hence, no time for me to put it aside. It created a real sense of mystery for me, and I highly enjoy when only bits and pieces of a story are revealed at a time. I love novels like this! The story itself is very beautifully told, and Gamber does a phenomenal job creating personable characters and down to earth themes, all dealing with different aspects, such as social, psychological, feministic, archetypal, and philosophical issues. I really enjoyed being able to analyze the characters and their actions on so many different levels, as that is what make a piece of literature excellent, in my eyes. I was pleasantly surprised by the ending of the novel, and am eagerly awaiting the next installment of the series, set to release late this year. Four stars!