Reflections Of A Mississippi Magnolia-A Life In Poems

Reflections Of A Mississippi Magnolia-A Life In Poems

by Patricia Neely-Dorsey

Paperback

$15.00
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780979629426
Publisher: Patricia Neely-Dorsey
Publication date: 02/22/2007
Pages: 110
Sales rank: 853,452
Product dimensions: 0.23(w) x 9.00(h) x 6.00(d)

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Reflections Of A Mississippi Magnolia-A Life In Poems 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
marthacheves on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Reflections of a Mississippi Magnolia - Review by Martha A. Cheves, Author of Stir, Laugh, Repeat I don't think I've ever picked up a book that brings back as many memories as Reflections of a Mississippi Magnolia. And the memories were all good memories. It made me remember growing up in the south and participating in the activities the poems represent. From the "Partyline" which talks about growing up with a telephone number shared by others, to the "Baptismal Sunday" which took place in a pond instead of a baptismal pool, and on to the "Making Cracklins" which I can still see my grandmother doing. I have many favorites in this little book of memories but two that touched me the most were "Shelling Peas" and "Slopping Hogs." These two poems really took me back to my childhood while growing up in the south. So, if you are a Southerner and would like to awaken some memories of when life was more laid back, this book is a must read. If you're not from the south, reading Reflections of a Mississippi Magnolia will let you see what you missed. For me, this is a book I'll cherish forever.
thornton37814 on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Patricia Neely-Dorsey has written a book of poems which will resonate with many Mississippians and Southerners. Her poetry reminds readers of a simpler time when neighbors gathered to slaughter the hogs and make cracklin at the end of the day, when doctors made house calls and accepted payment with hams, slabs of bacon, or whatever the patient could give, and when manners were learned at an early age and remembered throughout life. She writes of the common and everyday things. I relived some of my own childhood memories as I read her poem about "Reed's Department Store" and about the "Partyline." Most of the poems followed an ABCB rhyme scheme. My favorite poems in the book were those in which she broke away from this meter -- "Country Living," "Neighborhood Groceries," and "Warm and Fuzzy" are examples of these. One poem that did follow the ABCB rhyme scheme seemed to stand heads and shoulders above most of the others. This was "Our Place." It seemed that more time had been taken in selecting the perfect words for this poem. The author's love for her home state of Mississippi is evident throughout the book. While the poems are not on a par with those of Maya Angelou, Neely-Dorsey has written a book that will be loved by persons who appreciate the depiction of Southern life. I received this book from the author with the expectation that a review would be written.
kbaby920 More than 1 year ago
My thoughts: I like Poetry. I love the flow of it, the way the words seem to flow so very intricately. Patricia did a wonderful job describing her love for her family, life and home in Tupelo Mississippi. I felt like I could visualize this place although I have never visited. Each Poem is heart felt; I could feel the emotion attributed to it. Some were funny, some very deep in meaning. I could easily relate to the Poet. A lot of the language and descriptions had very southern dialect but I have heard here in my own home town. Patricia, through her writing, has conveyed a sweet loving memory of her life and home through her work. It was very touching and well written.
Maranda_Russell More than 1 year ago
The first poetry book that Patricia Neely-Dorsey released covers a broad range of topics, from southern life & country living to childhood memories, family history and other deeply personal subjects. Although I have never lived in Mississippi or spent much time there, I felt that Ms. Dorsey was able to bring the culture to life in a way that anyone could relate to. The poet’s pride and passion for her state shines through, illustrating the importance of connecting to a place and taking the time to truly lay down roots. Although I enjoyed the poems about southern life and country living, I must admit my favorite poems came later in the book when the author delved more deeply into her personal life and relationships. I especially related to a poem titled “Know It All (He Thinks)”, as I’m sure any parent of a teen or preteen could! Another favorite was the short poem, “Waxing Poetic”, which any creative spirit is sure to understand. As I read through the collection, I enjoyed the playful sense of humor in many of the poems, but also discovered a few poems that really made me stop and think or made me smile in wistful longing. This is definitely a poetry collection that is heartfelt, inspiring and easily understood. Whether you are a Mississippi native or not, this is one that can be enjoyed by everyone.