×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Reflections of a Warrior: Six Years as a Green Beret in Vietnam
     

Reflections of a Warrior: Six Years as a Green Beret in Vietnam

4.5 13
by Elwood J.C. Kureth
 

See All Formats & Editions

PFC Franklin Miller arrived in Vietnam in March 1966, and saw his first combat in a Reconnaissance Platoon. So began an odyssey that would make him into one of the most feared and respected men in the Special Forces elite, who made their own rules in the chaos of war.

In the exclusive world of the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, Studies and Observation

Overview

PFC Franklin Miller arrived in Vietnam in March 1966, and saw his first combat in a Reconnaissance Platoon. So began an odyssey that would make him into one of the most feared and respected men in the Special Forces elite, who made their own rules in the chaos of war.

In the exclusive world of the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, Studies and Observation Group, Miller ran missions deep into enemy territory to gather intelligence, snatch prisoners, and to kill. Leading small bands of battle-hardened Montagnard and Meo tribesmen, he was fierce and fearless -- fighting army policy to stay in combat for six tours. On a top-secret mission in 1970, Miller and a handful of men, all critically injured, held off the NVA in an incredible Alamo-like stand -- for which he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. When his time in Southeast Asia ended, he had also received the Silver Star, two Bronze Stars, an Air Medal, and six Purple Hearts. This is his incredible story.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416598350
Publisher:
Pocket Books
Publication date:
11/01/2007
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
271,058
File size:
461 KB

Meet the Author


Franklin Miller was a recipient of the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest award for valor, the Silver Star, two Bronze Stars, the Air Medal, and six Purple Hearts in four years in combat, prompting Gen. Henry H. Shelton, then chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to call him "an icon to what service in the armed forces is about." He retired from the army in 1992 as a command sergeant major, becoming a benefits counselor for the Veterans Administration. He passed away on June 30, 2000.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Reflections of a Warrior: Six Years as a Green Beret in Vietnam 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
jumpmasterTO More than 1 year ago
I was able to serve with this man... He was nothing but a Soldiers, Soldier... Many people come into your life that impacts it... I felt every word of this book... I could not put it down...
84fxstc More than 1 year ago
It was a book that I have been wanting to read all my life, he told it like it was, and I have to thank him for that
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must read for those who want to read about the true warrior spirit
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
kathi davis More than 1 year ago
this book. was awesome thank you frank miller you are a ture hero.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book was a great read. It showed me a lot about what really went down with the green berets in 'nam. You gotta get this if your interested in these kinda books.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this book and had a hard time putting it down. Doug's account of combat and the life he lived is very differant from that of a civilian. It seemed like a was reading fiction. The things he did in his life are things that a normal human will never know or fully understand. This inclueds myself. This book takes you in to the war through his eyes. It shows how a 19 year old kid spends six years in combat in not only comes out alive, but as one of the most decorrated men of the war. What really makes this book great is the simplisity of it. It's almost as if you r dad or gramp is sitting next to you telling you what they did in the war, but much much cooller.