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Reframing Theology and Film (Cultural Exegesis): New Focus for an Emerging Discipline

Reframing Theology and Film (Cultural Exegesis): New Focus for an Emerging Discipline

Reframing Theology and Film (Cultural Exegesis): New Focus for an Emerging Discipline

Reframing Theology and Film (Cultural Exegesis): New Focus for an Emerging Discipline

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Overview

The connection between theology and film is a hot topic in the academy and the church. But research and writing on methodology and hermeneutics is lacking. This comprehensive collection identifies the overlooked or undervalued areas in the current discussions of film and theology. Including contributions from the leaders in the field, Reframing Theology and Film helps deepen the conversation while bringing it to a new level of prominence. Professors and students of theology and film, libraries, pastors, and film buffs will benefit from this much-needed resource.


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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781441201720
Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/01/2007
Series: Cultural Exegesis
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: eBook
Pages: 336
File size: 948 KB

About the Author

Robert K. Johnston (PhD, Duke University) is professor of theology and culture at Fuller Theological Seminary. He is the coeditor of both the Engaging Culture and the Cultural Exegesis series and is the author or coauthor of several books, including Useless Beauty, Finding God in the Movies, and Reel Spirituality.
Robert K. Johnston (PhD, Duke University) is professor of theology and culture at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California, and codirector of Fuller's Reel Spirituality Institute. He is the coeditor of both the Engaging Culture and the Cultural Exegesis series and is the author or coauthor of several books, including Reel Spirituality and God's Wider Presence.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Notes on the Contributors
Introduction: Revisioning the Discipline (Robert K. Johnston)
Section 1: Moving Beyond a "Literary" Paradigm
1. Seeing and Believing: Film Theory as a Window into a Visual Faith (Craig Detweiler)
2. The Color of Sound: Music and Meaning Making in Film (Barry Taylor)
Section 2: Broadening Our Film Selection
3. World Cinema: Opportunities for Dialogue with Religion and Theology (Gaye Williams Ortiz)
4. Letters on Better Movies (Sara Anson Vaux)
Section 3: Extending Our Conversation Partners
5. Film and the Subjective Turn: How the Sociology of Religion Can Contribute to Theological Readings of Film (Gordon Lynch)
6. Hollywood Chronicles: Toward an Intersection of Church History and Film History (Terry Lindvall)
Section 4: Engaging the Viewer
7. On Dealing with What Films Actually Do to People: The Practice and Theory of Film Watching in Theology/Religion and Film Discussion (Clive Marsh)
8. Polanyi's Personal Knowledge and Watching Movies (Rebecca Ver Straten-McSparran)
9. Películas--¿Through Whose Lenses? Going to the Movies with Latinas in LA (Catherine M. Barsotti)
Section 5: Reconsidering the Normative
10. Theology and Film: Interreligious Dialogue and Theology (John Lyden)
11. From Film Emotion to Normative Criticism (Mitch Avila)
12. From Bultmann to Burton, Demythologizing the Big Fish: The Contribution of Modern Christian Theologians to the Theology-Film Conversation (Christopher Deacy)
Section 6: Making Use of Our Theological Traditions
13. Shaping Morals, Shifting Views: Have the Rating Systems Influenced How (Christian) America Sees Movies? (Rose Pacatte, FSP)
14. Within the Image: Film as Icon (Gerard Loughlin)
15. Transformative Viewing: Penetrating the Story's Surface (Robert K. Johnston)

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