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Reminiscences
     

Reminiscences

by Thomas March Clark
 
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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. SEMINARY LIFE. No one can have failed to notice that scenes once familiar to us, which have become remote by the lapse of time, will in certain aspects appear to

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. SEMINARY LIFE. No one can have failed to notice that scenes once familiar to us, which have become remote by the lapse of time, will in certain aspects appear to be almost as fresh and sharp-lined as they were long years ago, and then again the mist settles down upon them and they have all the vagueness of a dream. Sixty years ago I had my abode in the theological seminary at Princeton, and sometimes, as I catch a glimpse of the old belfry in whirling along the railway from New York to Philadelphia, it all comes back so distinctly—the plain, unadorned chapel, the recitation rooms, the dining halls, the dignified professors, the throng of students, the long service on Sunday morning, the Calvinistic lectures, the marvelous exegesis of Scripture, the half-hatched essays of the young men, and the searching criticisms of the teachers—I seem to see and hear it all as if it were a thing of yesterday. Then comes a cloud, and, looking through that cloud of time, everything becomes indistinct and ghostly. All the good professors long ago took up their abode in some higher realm, most of my companions have closed their accounts here, and the few who survive are no longer young, but they are all old—waiting for their summons. I presume that the buildings and surroundings remainmuch as they were, and it is said that the same old doctrines continue to be taught. Princeton Seminary is just as sound as it ever was, still clamped to the rock of eternal, immutable, unconditional decrees, in conformity with the declaration of the Confession of Faith: " By the decree of God, for the manifestation of His glory, some men and angels are predestinated unto everlasting life, and others foreordained to everlasting death. These angels and men, thus predestinated and foreordained, are par...

Product Details

BN ID:
2940025955498
Publisher:
Thomas Whittaker
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
357 KB

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CHAPTER III. SEMINARY LIFE. No one can have failed to notice that scenes once familiar to us, which have become remote by the lapse of time, will in certain aspects appear to be almost as fresh and sharp-lined as they were long years ago, and then again the mist settles down upon them and they have all the vagueness of a dream. Sixty years ago I had my abode in the theological seminary at Princeton, and sometimes, as I catch a glimpse of the old belfry in whirling along the railway from New York to Philadelphia, it all comes back so distinctlythe plain, unadorned chapel, the recitation rooms, the dining halls, the dignified professors, the throng of students, the long service on Sunday morning, the Calvinistic lectures, the marvelous exegesis of Scripture, the half-hatched essays of the young men, and the searching criticisms of the teachersI seem to see and hear it all as if it were a thing of yesterday. Then comes a cloud, and, looking through that cloud of time, everything becomes indistinct and ghostly. All the good professors long ago took up their abode in some higher realm, most of my companions have closed their accounts here, and the few who survive are no longer young, but they are all oldwaiting for their summons. I presume that the buildings and surroundings remainmuch as they were, and it is said that the same old doctrines continue to be taught. Princeton Seminary is just as sound as it ever was, still clamped to the rock of eternal, immutable, unconditional decrees, in conformity with the declaration of the Confession of Faith: " By the decree of God, for the manifestation of His glory, some men and angels are predestinated unto everlasting life, and othersforeordained to everlasting death. These angels and men, thus predestinated and foreordained, are par...

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