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Rich Nation, Strong Army: National Security and the Technological Transformation of Japan
     

Rich Nation, Strong Army: National Security and the Technological Transformation of Japan

by Richard J. Samuels
 

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'An original and illuminating interpretation of what makes Japan a power to be reckoned with in the global village's marketplace.... The author argues persuasively that Japan's continuing drive for unassailable autonomy (in aircraft, communications, and other strategic industries) is firmly rooted in ancient ideologies and institutions designed to serve the public

Overview

'An original and illuminating interpretation of what makes Japan a power to be reckoned with in the global village's marketplace.... The author argues persuasively that Japan's continuing drive for unassailable autonomy (in aircraft, communications, and other strategic industries) is firmly rooted in ancient ideologies and institutions designed to serve the public interest. A genuinely fresh framework in which to evaluate the challenges a Pacific Rim colossus poses for the West.' - Kirkus Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
In this work, Samuels (political science, MIT), examines Japan's technological development since the end of the Edo Period in the second half of the 19th century. The central thesis is that Japan's economic growth since then, whether during peace or war, has been fired by a kind of ``technonationalism'' that can be defined as ``an ideology of technological development that advances national interest.'' The case overall is well argued and well supported, and the author is clearly in command of his subject. The book, however, is intended for a fairly sophisticated audience and will be rather rough going for the nonexpert. Recommended chiefly for academic and large public libraries.-Scott Wright, Univ. of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minn.
Booknews
The key to Japan's technological miracle of the last half century, says Samuels (political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), can be traced to an ideology that survived the defeat in World War II. From 1868 to 1945, he says, economic development was driven by the desire to enhance the nation through military might; since then the military element has dropped out, but technological expansion is still pursued for the good of the nation rather than for the individual or company. In so doing, they have become a major supplier of military technology for everyone else. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher
"This book is a pleasure to read. It is a well-argued, lucid account and explanation of Japanese economic success since the Second World War; it is an excellent example of how, historically, to tackle questions of technology and technological innovation and their relation to economic change; and it provides fascinating insight into the debate about the role of national defense in either stimulating or suffocating economic activity."—Business History

"A masterful study of the Japanese arms and aircraft industries, analyzing the interrelationship between military and civilian technology since the mid-nineteenth century."—Foreign Affairs

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801427053
Publisher:
Cornell University Press
Publication date:
02/29/2000
Series:
Cornell Studies in Political Economy
Pages:
480
Product dimensions:
6.44(w) x 9.54(h) x 1.48(d)

Meet the Author

Richard J. Samuels is Ford International Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for International Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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