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The Rough Riders
     

The Rough Riders

3.3 27
by Theodore Roosevelt
 

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The advent of war with Spain was a glorious opportunity for forceful leadership not to be missed by the hotheaded young Theodore Roosevelt. He resigned his post as assistant-secretary of the Navy in April, 1898, and, despite the strong disapproval of family and friends, he joined the Army as Lt. Colonel of a regiment to be raised in the territories of Arizona, New

Overview

The advent of war with Spain was a glorious opportunity for forceful leadership not to be missed by the hotheaded young Theodore Roosevelt. He resigned his post as assistant-secretary of the Navy in April, 1898, and, despite the strong disapproval of family and friends, he joined the Army as Lt. Colonel of a regiment to be raised in the territories of Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. He ordered a uniform from Brooks Brothers, a dozen pairs of steel spectacles, “a couple of good, stout, quiet horses,” and he was off to train his volunteers at San Antonio. The Rough Riders were a most unusual regiment. Informal, independent, made up of ex-cowboys, Western bad men, and Ivy League graduates, Roosevelt’s troops made a poor impression on Army regulars but provided excellent copy for the nation’s newspapers. On July 22, 1898, this motley cavalry regiment waded ashore in Cuba, and before the summer was over the Rough Riders and their impatient, dynamic leader were familiar to virtually every household in the nation. Roosevelt was being considered for nomination to the governorship of New York, and his march to the Presidency had begun. From the time he left Washington to join his regiment for training in Texas to their triumphant return from Cuba, Roosevelt kept daily records of his thoughts and experiences. These jottings formed the basis of this book, by far the best firsthand story of the Spanish-American War. Published in 1899 to instant acclaim, The Rough Riders is written with Roosevelt’s typical gusto. His writing is remarkable for his sure sense of personality and the spontaneity and directness of his prose. Reading the book, it is impossible not to sense the exhilaration of battle, or the moral purpose behind it all. The Rough Riders remains one of the great war stories of our time, and offers an invaluable look at one of the most colorful presidents of the United States.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012523150
Publisher:
Cherry Lane Ebooks
Publication date:
12/28/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
570,993
File size:
418 KB

Meet the Author

Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was the 26th President of the United States. He is noted for his energetic personality, range of interests and achievements, leadership of the Progressive Movement, and his "cowboy" image and robust masculinity.[4] He was a leader of the Republican Party and founder of the short-lived Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party of 1912. Before becoming President (1901–09), he held offices at the municipal, state, and federal level of government. Roosevelt's achievements as a naturalist, explorer, hunter, author, and soldier are as much a part of his fame as any office he held as a politician.

Born into a wealthy family, Roosevelt was an unhealthy child who suffered from asthma and stayed at home studying natural history. In response to his physical weakness, he embraced a strenuous life. He was home-schooled and became a passionate student of nature. He attended Harvard, where he boxed and developed an interest in naval affairs. In 1881, one year out of Harvard, he was elected to the New York State Assembly as its youngest member. Roosevelt's first historical book, The Naval War of 1812 (1882), established his professional reputation as a serious historian. After a few years of living in the Badlands, Roosevelt returned to New York City, where he gained fame for fighting police corruption. The Spanish American War broke out while Roosevelt was, effectively, running the Department of the Navy. He promptly resigned and led a small regiment in Cuba known as the Rough Riders, earning himself a nomination for the Medal of Honor, which was received posthumously on his behalf on January 16, 2001. After the war, he returned to New York and was elected Governor in a close-fought election. Within two years. he was elected Vice President of the United States.

In 1901, President William McKinley was assassinated; and Roosevelt became President at the age of 42, taking office at the youngest age of any U.S. President in history.

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The Rough Riders (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Rough Rider's Charge up San Juan Hill...didn't happen. I now know why the Rough Riders called the hill they did storm "Kettle" hill. Fascinating references to the differences between the black powder guns of the U.S. and the newfangled "smokeless " gun powder used by the Spanish in both their Mauser Rifles and their new artillery. The book goes deeply into the fabric of the Rough Riders. Where they came from and the strengths of the men were obviously a source of great pride to President to be Roosevelt. Read this book it is worth it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You all are messed up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks out clearly anoyed by the girl
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im bi does that count
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Having always been a fan of Teddy, I was excited to read this book. I don't know if it was just me, but I found this book to be pretty tedious and self aggrandizing. I don't think it was for me. Three stars is pushing it.
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