Run

Run

by Ann Patchett
3.6 95

Hardcover

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Run 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 95 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a huge fan of Ann Patchett. I absolutely hold Bel Canto up as one of my favorite books. In that work, she wove together so many characters and such a complex plot that it was breathtaking. I also have read her non-fiction work, Truth and Beauty about her friendship with another writer. That was personal and intense. I thought Run was a light read and an OK story, but not as rich as her other work.
TheReadingWriter More than 1 year ago
Run has the cold, dark atmosphere of winter in Boston, and as such the setting reminded me of Benjamin Black's Christine Falls. All but one chapter of Run takes place in a short time frame (24 hours), and I would argue, is more successful in creating a tension and bringing it to resolution. The characterizations are interesting: young black men, adopted sons of the former mayor of Boston who is a white man, find their birth mother accidentally. The sons' voices are true to their upbringing. One can completely forget their black skins because their voices and sensibilities are wealthy white. The birth mother is raising a young girl, whose voice also seems unique and true. This group interacts in tentative, revealing ways as tragedy befalls them. Run is an intimate novel resonant with emotional depth. If the novel feels "small" because of the short time frame, it also feels alive and precious, like a jewel in the hand. If one were to turn the story over in one's mind and hold it to the light, it might just refract and split with all the colors of a prism.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I started reading this book on vacation ( it was at the rental we were staying at). I didn't expect to finish it but found myself totally hooked on the story line and characters. It is rare when I find a writer that can grab me from the start. I found myself thinking of the characters long after I had finished the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A beautiful book! After I read it I gave it to all of my reading friends for Christmas. I am a longtime fan of Ann Patchett. (Bel Canto is gorgeous.) I love that the time frame of Run is 24- hours and yet a rich, wonderful story is told. I would love a book about Sullivan, what an intriguing character.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While the story is original with a twist or two (and one crucial piece of information that is revealed to the reader, but not to the characters), the writing is simple, prosaic even. Did the same author write both Run and Bel Canto? It hardly seems possible. Yet to its credit the "easy read" of Run makes it accessible to a casual teen reader as well as to adults and offers fodder for many supper conversations--race relations, adoption, father-son/mother-daughter relations, secrets, life choices, career determination, college work, mentoring, sports, and more. Despite the conventionality of the writing style, I recommend it.
NYC-LIReader More than 1 year ago
I've read other books by Ann Patchett but was unprepared for this one. It was very different (and I liked it more) than her others. The story was warm and so touching -- with great character development. I loved everything about it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Patchett interweaves the stories of several intriguing and inviting characters until they encounter each other and interact during one life-changing day. A tour de force of character, plot and meaning. Patchett is a masterful storyteller; you'll find you can't put the book down until you've finished it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ann Patchett is one of our finer story tellers writing today and certainly her latest novel RUN keeps pace (if not exceeds) with her previous works. Patchett has the uncanny ability to introduce 'facsimiles' of characters in very subtle ways, blending her ingredient characters slowly, revealing their full personalities and places in the storyline so gradually that reading about them resembles meeting new acquaintances at a party - some will fade, others will materialize as leads. In RUN, Patchett addresses mixed race adoption, responses to death, biologic versus adoptive mothers, and family dynamics, all in the course of a twenty-four hour period of time, and in doing so she compresses so much information that reading this fine novel begs for a one sitting time frame to read it from cover to cover. Former Boston Mayor Bernard Doyle and his Irish wife Bernadette had one child - Sullivan - a lad who failed to fulfill his father's expectations of entering the political arena. Sullivan was involved in a tragedy that affected not only Sullivan and his girlfriend, but also fragmented Bernard's career. Unable to have further children, the couple adopted an African American newborn 'Teddy' only to have the child's biologic mother (Tennessee Moser) offer her 14-month-old child 'Tip' to the Doyles - an offer the Doyles happily accepted. Bernadette dies too soon and the two African American brothers are raised by Bernard: Sullivan has fled to Africa to work with AIDS patients as a means to assuage his guilt for the tragedy he caused. The story begins on a wintry night after a Jesse Jackson lecture when Tip is saved from a near tragic SUV collision by a woman who pushes him to safety - that woman being Tennessee who had been to the lecture with her eleven-year-old daughter Kenya. Tennessee is critically injured and Kenya is invited by the Doyles to stay with them while her mother is taken to the hospital: Tip's sole injury from the accident is a damaged ankle. It is the manner in which the discovery of kinship between Kenya and Tennessee and Teddy and Tip that shapes the next day's events. Patchett gradually builds this chocolate and vanilla layered cake to allow us to see how Tennessee has secretly followed her two sons Tip and Teddy and their father, keeping her distance, but never forsaking her love and concern for her own boys. Kenya is taken in by the Doyle men, including the now returned from Africa Sullivan, and the melding of this mixed family faces the challenges of discovering roots, loss of adopted mother and re-entry of biologic mother, and the bonding of true family. If the novel has a disappointing ending (Patchett jumps in time to four years hence that tidies up too many loose ends too quickly), that last chapter's slightly hokey summation is minor when the entire novel is considered. Patchett writes with intelligent style, elegant prose, and timely character development, creating a story that remains with the reader long after the last page. It is a fine book, worthy of the attention it is receiving on the Top 10 Lists. Highly Recommended. Grady Harp
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Run is a very engaging and entertaining read. I found it more compelling a read than Bel Canto, and loved the unusual plot and its turns of events. The title is a good metaphor for many elements of the story, and the inclusion of real time folks in a fictional story make it even more fun to read. Patchett creates a cast of characters you like and want to find happiness and fulfillment. I really liked it and read it quickly which is my late life barometer of a good read. It is a satisfying, neatly wrapped up story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Maybe not her best work, which for me is State of Wonder, but I have not been disappointed by writing in the four novels of hers that I've read so far. An interesting look at what it means to be a family thru the eyes of all the family members. Could it have been better? Probably, but it was in no way a badly written story. Ms. Patchett definitely has a way with words and can paint portraits of characters as well as anyone. I think it's worth the time to read, and would recommend it and any of her works. She is my new favorite author.
lauradayton More than 1 year ago
Well written with good plot and good character development.  Plan to read more by this author
abriella More than 1 year ago
Although not as riveting as Ann Patchett's latest book, State of Wonder, Run is engaging and very readable. I cared about the characters and wanted to find out what would happen next. Definitely a possible book for a book club, as there are many themes addressed.
diana45 More than 1 year ago
I began reading this book with high expectations, and I was a little disappointed. It was a nice story, but I didn't feel like I wanted to keep on reading. When I get a book, I want to be exited when I find time to read it. But with this one, I wasn't that thrilled. It's a nice story though.
review4U More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up expecting the literary quality and craftsmanship that I found in Bel Canto. Instead I found a hack job that looked like it had been cranked out to meet a publisher's deadline. Patchett should have thrown it in the wastebasket and started over. I kept reading because I was waiting for the plot to pick up and it never did. The novel is so derivative that the author seems to have delibrately thrown in a little something for everyone. I grew up in Boston and did not even find the setting accurately portrayed or compelling. I have worked in hospitals all my life -- even the medical details were superficial. I loved Bel Canto but I would be reluctant to try another Patchett novel I was so disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of my top 10 favorite books. It shows the true meaning of family. The book took me on an entirely different journey than I expected from the first few pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Run by Ann Patchett takes place over a twenty-four hour period. Patchett grabs readers right at the beginning by starting the story at the end of a very important event, Bernadette Doyle's death. With the first line, "Bernadette had been dead two weeks when her sisters showed up in Doyle's living room asking for the statue back." Patchett starts the story right away drawing in readers from the very first sentence. Patchett continues with a story of a statue of the Virgin Mary that has been passed down through Bernadette's family. Each generation, the statue is given to one daughter. Bernadette had been the one in her generation to receive it. Because of Bernadette's untimely death and her failure to produce any daughters, Bernadette's sisters believed they had a right to the statue. Bernard Doyle, the former mayor of Boston, would not have this. He believed that any one of his and Bernadette's children, including two adoptive African American sons, Tip and Teddy, and biological son Sullivan, had just as much the right to the statue as anyone. Patchett uses the story of the statue to set the scene of the book, laying out the specific details and characters necessary for the storyline to come. After the story of the statue, the plot jumps ahead about fifteen years. Every one of the characters in Run is complex with very real emotions. Throughout Patchett's use of third person point of view alternating between characters, readers are able to fully see the extent of each character's personality and emotions. The emotions that Patchett gives her characters are very believable and relatable. Seeing through each of the main character's eyes shows the contrast between the characters; each of the characters is very unique. Teddy is the "friendly", "loving" one of the brothers while Tip is the "smart" one. The third person point-of-view in Run is what allows the story to flow so well. Patchett uses imagery throughout Run to draw readers into the setting of the story. The character's emotions in the story are not the only things felt by readers. It is Patchett's use of imagery that makes Run seem so real, whether it be Tip, when he "closed his eyes and felt the snow melting on his tongue," or "the sound of Sullivan calling their names." Patchett does a great job of combining human emotion and imagery to allow readers to experience the book. The title of Run depicts the many races that take place in the book both metaphorically and literally, whether it be Tip and Teddy racing to meet their father or Doyle's race to keep all of his children safe. This title also refers to the book's fast pace and the little amount of time that the story takes place in. While Run is a fast paced book, the plot never seems rushed. Patchett allows plenty of time for the personalities and relationships of the characters to be known and developed in a very short time. The ties between family are very strong throughout this book. It is within these family ties and that the themes lie. The themes that Patchett is trying to get across become evident as the ties between families are tested and as new ties form. These ties are first tested with an unexpected event during a heavy snow storm. After dragging Teddy and Tip to a political event, Doyle was trying to convince them to come to the reception. Tip, a Harvard student, would rather be at his job as an ichthyolygist's assistant...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wanders, caught a mouse then continued on.
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