Sad Cypress (Hercule Poirot Series)

Sad Cypress (Hercule Poirot Series)

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Sad Cypress 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 55 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was really good. It's a quick read. The solution is nothing short of surprising. However the only bad point was that the final denouement was NOT presented by Poirot himself, but someone else entirely. Poirot still figures out the solution but someone else reveals it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Agatha christie displays her ingenuity yet again.A different sort of book with a totally unexpected ending.The plot is flawless and the ending really baffles you.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Sad Cypress' is often referred to as one of the most outstanding of Christie's classic titles. To my mind, that's a bit like trying to say which flawless diamond shines the brightest. Nonetheless, this absorbing story is set in an English country house. As for Hercule Poirot - who else but David Suchet? He is acclaimed by many as the quintessential Poirot. Those who have seen his PBS performances will readily agree. His voice treatment of this tale brings to vivid reality all the nuances and eccentricities of the characters involved. 'Sad Cypress' presents Elinor Carlisle as a woman blessed with beauty and brains reinforced by wealth - she also finds herself on trial for murder. She stands accused of killing her rival, Mary Gerrard, by poison. Poirot is the only one who believes in her innocence. He needs to prove she is not guilty or Elinor will be hung. As with other Christie mysteries clues are liberally sprinkled throughout the tale. What fun to try to find them!
Anonymous 11 months ago
Great mystery. The style is a little different, but it is very effective. However, to all the people who wrote reviews that really are not reviews: GET A LIFE!!! KEEP YOUR SENSELESS, OFTEN SICK, IRRELEVANT CRAP OUT OF THE REVIEW SECTION! If, and only if, you've read a book should you leave a review for it! It is NOT a forum for your crazy or bizarre rants, statements, and other assorted non book-related drivel!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Swooped down
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lays down real sad
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Benedick_101 More than 1 year ago
Personally, I really loved "Sad Cypress". I thought that the scenery of her words were delightful, and the entire story was very good. The protagonist (Elinor Carlisle) is accused of murdering the young girl who she believed her fiancee to be in love with. Everything is working against her: the motive, the opportunity, the other witness statements, but fortunateky one thing that's working for her is Hercule Poirot.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The_Iceman More than 1 year ago
Elinor Carlisle, a sensible, well educated young woman, and her distant cousin, Roddy Welman, a somewhat less well focused amiable gentleman - perhaps even a bit of a dandy - are happily engaged. They both know they are living somewhat beyond their means but they take comfort in their expectation of the inheritance of a very sizable fortune from their elderly aunt, Laura Welman. When they receive an anonymous mean-spirited letter suggesting that someone is cozying up to their aunt and worming their way into her affections, Elinor suspects young Mary Gerrard, her aunt's lodge-keeper's daughter. Rationalizing with one another that they really ought to be making a greater effort to see their aunt more frequently, Elinor and Roddy quickly pack up for a visit to Mrs Welman with a concerned view to protecting their interests in the estate.

During the course of their visit, when Roddy's head is turned by Mary Gerrard's stunning good looks and he becomes hopelessly infatuated with her, Elinor breaks off their engagement. When Mary Gerrard is murdered by the administration of a fatal dose of morphine in a sandwich and, shortly afterward, Aunt Laura dies intestate leaving Elinor as the sole heir of the entire estate by virtue of being the only surviving blood relative, Elinor quickly finds herself in the dock for Mary's murder. As the only suspect with both the means and the motive to dispose of Mary Gerrard, her conviction is all but certain.

But "Sad Cypress" is a complex mystery with many motivational twists and turns. Roddy Welman's head wasn't the only head turned with new found love. Peter Lord, the Welman's family physician, has fallen behind over tea kettle into love with Elinor Carlisle. When she is arrested, although even he is uncertain as to her guilt, he retains Hercule Poirot and charges him with finding the evidence to acquit her at any cost.

"Sad Cypress", a subtle, complex purely character driven mystery told virtually entirely through the device of dialogue, has an interesting three part structure. In the first part, told from Elinor Carlisle's perspective, we see the background of the entire story up to Mary Gerrard's murder. In the second part, we are witness to Poirot's subtle probing and investigation of the murder and, in the final third section, we sit in court as witness to Elinor's trial and prosecution for the murder. In a marvelous twist on the cozy mystery's usual climactic drawing room confrontation with all of the suspects, Poirot's findings are revealed to the reader by Elinor's defense lawyer during the proceedings of her trial.

While "Sad Cypress" is a marvelously entertaining mystery, I'm unwilling to accord it a full five star rating because I believe it violates what I always felt to be an unwritten set of rules governing the genre. The mystery in "Sad Cypress" is simply not solvable by an astute reader no matter how carefully one might read the story. Ultimately, the mystery is solved and revealed by virtue of information to which only Poirot is privy. The superb surprise ending is no less entertaining as a result but one does feel a little cheated.

On a historical note, I was interested to discover that this was Agatha Christie's first use of the courtroom setting in a Poirot mystery.

Highly recommended.

Paul Weiss
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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glauver More than 1 year ago
Agatha Christie set her mystery up quite cleverly. Of course, Hercule Poirot arrived on the scene and came up with a totally implausible solution. If you can accept that someone who had been living in the local village under an alias could just waltz in and claim an inheritance by revealing their true identity, good for you. I can't buy it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought could trust foxes she whispered went back to the auk slowly
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Seven watched him go sadly. [Perf timing Mom. Not! T~T]
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gawd. o.e
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He listens to her, each word making him feel even more guilty. After she finishes, all he says is, "sorry," before getting to his paws and padding off. He wasn't going back to camp, he was going somewhere else... (Gah. Read Rand's post at BC. Bbt.)