Saddam: King of Terror

Saddam: King of Terror

by Con Coughlin
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Saddam: King of Terror 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Beirut768 More than 1 year ago
Someone must be suffering from cold feet.

The Iraqi army has dissolved and disintegrated and regrouped into small widely separated divisions, up to now incapable of organized performances, least of all policing Baghdad.

The world ridiculed the idea that Saddam had amassed weapons of mass destruction (now ironically referred to as `had the potential capability of possessing WMD' - you see! the legend `potential' was simply added to give an evasive answer to the question `why has the UN decided to remove Saddam?'

Now we listen to bits and pieces of a so-called `Saddam's court martial', where Saddam has been exhausting the court but never exhausted, engaging everyone in heated arguments, until the judge was on the verge of losing his temper. Indeed he lost it and dismissed Saddam.
Saddam won the day!!!!
It was a great personal victory for Saddam.
Of course no one has any means of knowing who's really speaking the truth.
The coalition forces believed they had at last a revealing insight into the state of Saddam's mind after his dishonourable capture, but the way the ex-president is treated in court leaves a lot to be desired.

Many responsible officials after Saddam were about to commiserate on their heavy responsibilities despite the support they have been getting from the `strongest power on this planet'

I saw the look of dismay in the eyes of those who read this prematurely written book; perhaps the author thought that Saddam would be a dead corpse by the time this epistle had been published.
Who knows!
And Iraq, in the absence of as strong a government, is still in terrible predicament.
The battle for Saddam Hussein is virtually beginning.
To many laypersons in the Arab world, the `story' does not seem to be finishing soon, and the author will have to revisit the last four years brimful with additional important material for his readers.