The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki

The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki

by Anonymous, Jesse L. Byock

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780140435931
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/01/1999
Series: Penguin Classics Series
Pages: 144
Sales rank: 396,663
Product dimensions: 5.12(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Jesse Byock has also translated the Saga of Volsungs, published by Penguin.

Table of Contents

Translated with an Introduction by Jesse L. Byock

Introduction
The Sagas of Ancient Times and Heroic Lays
Skjold and the Skjoldung Dynasty: The Legendary Past
Archaeology and the Legendary Hleidargard
The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki and Beowulf
Beowulf and Bodvar Bjarki: The Bear Warriors
Berserkers
Myth in the Saga
Christian Influence

Map: The World of The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki
Note on the Translation

The Saga
1. King Frodi Kills His Brother King Halfdan
2. The Search
3. The Boys Helgi and Hroar Revealed
4. The Death of King Frodi
5. King Helgi Rules Denmark and King Hroar Marries
6. King Helgi Attempts to Marry Queen Olof
7. King Helgi's Vengeance: The Girl Yrsa; The Ring
8. Jarl Hrok Claims King Hroar's Ring
9. Vengeance and King Hroar's Son Agnar
10. King Helgi and Queen Yrsa
11. The Elfin Woman and the Birth of Skuld
12. King Adils and King Helgi Meet
13. King Adils' Pride and Queen Yrsa's Displeasure
14. Svipdag and the Berserkers
15. Svipdag and His Brothers Join King Hrolf's Men
16. King Hrolf Tricks King Hjorvard
17. King Hring of Norway Marries Hvit
18. The Love of Bera and Bjorn
19. Bjorn Rejects Queen Hvit's Advances: The Curse
20. Bjorn's Transformation into a Bear and the Birth of Bodvar
21. Thorir Becomes King of the Gauts
22. Bodvar's Vengeance
23. Bodvar and His Brothers
24. King Hrolf's Champions
25. Bodvar Encourages King Hrolf to Recover His Inheritance
26. Three Strange Nights with Hrani
27. King Adils' Deceitful Welcome
28. King Adils Attempts to Defeat King Hrolf
29. Queen Yrsa Gives King Hrolf His Inheritance and More
30. King Adils is Conquered by Gold and King Hrolf Angers Hrani
31. Queen Skuld Incites King Hjorvard
32. Queen Skuld Attacks King Hrolf at Yule
33. The Great Battle
34. The Death of King Hrolf Kraki

Notes
Genealogical Tables: The Family of King Hrolf Kraki; The Family of Bodvar Bjarki; The Family of Svipdag
Equivalent Characters in Old Norse, Old English and Latin Accounts of King Hrolf Kraki
Glossary of Proper Names

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The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
isabelx on LibraryThing 10 months ago
As King Hrolf Kraki was referred to in the last poem in The Poetic Edda, I decided it would be a good time to get round to reading his saga. King Hrolf Kraki was a legendary Danish King, and this saga mostly concerns power-struggles between members of his family over several generations.There are versions of this story from other parts of Northern Europe, including "Beowulf" from England which was written down earlier than the Icelandic version. The king's champion Bodvar Bjarki is the saga's equivalent of Beowulf, but the monster he fights is rather different from Grendel.If you decide to read any of the Icelandic sagas I would really recommend the Penguin Classics editions. They have fantastic introductions and lots of notes, which really help you understand the history, geography, mythology and culture of Northern Europe in the dark ages and early mediaeval period.
Rode More than 1 year ago
Very good reading , especially for those interested in mythology. Lineages, titles, and names provided.
Ruthven More than 1 year ago
The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki is an amzing tale about the Skjoldung dynasty (Scylding in Beowulf). The story opens up with the background of King Hrolf himself and then details those of his champions before coming together for their greatest adventures. This is an epic tale equal in proportion to that of Sigurd and the Volsungs. This is a particularly enjoyable translation, with insightful notes on the origin of the story and its similarities with the epic poem Beowulf.