Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter

Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter

by Thomas Cahill
3.6 16

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Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very well researched and in-depth. A very well written reference book to keep in your library.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Cahill shows himself erudite, but ever the pop historian in this latest effort. Despite the occasional plug for his other books, and a bizarre penchant for showing ancient porn that really doesn't seem necessary to his thesis, he makes a pretty good case for that the Greeks really are the fathers of Western civilization. Includes a good intro to Homer, Greek theater, and sculpture.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mr. Cahill decides to alienate half his readers , myself being one. The author will not have any further books read by me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If "Gifts of the Jews" provided a "spiritual" aspect to humankinds' journey through history, The Greeks gave human society structure, an alphabet, and an idea of the way things should work to the benefit of all humankind. Such is well presented in "Sailing the Wine Dark Sea". Again, read "Gifs of he Jews" first for continuity.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lololol!!! I will store those away
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was required reading for 9th grade at my children's school. Not a good choice. Many pointless sexual themes. Too many quotes from books no high school child will have read.
Carl_in_Richland More than 1 year ago
I had the sense that the author would like to have had additional pages available for all he wanted to share. The books is filled with high level overviews of the history of the early Greeks, their worldview, their social lives, politics, philosophy and art. Each chapter picks a few specific examples to illustrate the key points (my favorite was inclusion of the famous “Funeral Oration” of Pericles, presented to illustrate the spirit of Greece in fifth century BC). So of course with over 800 years of history, art, etc. squeezed into 264 pages, much had to be omitted. Further reducing how much the author was able to include in the text was a marvelous section of photographs of Greek art and architecture. One big picture item I came away with from this book is that there were perhaps three broad categories of ‘ancient’ Greeks, these being the Greeks of Homer (tricky is good) , the Greeks of Apollo (reason is good), and the Greeks of Dionysus (religious ecstasy is best brought out by a good amphora of wine!). The subtitle of this book is ‘why the Greeks matter’ and I came away thinking the answer is that many of the problems we face today were faced by the Greeks. We have issues with our economy, over extended battlefields, divisive politics, major splits regarding who, if anybody, has the correct religion, rapidly changing moral values, etc. The ancient Greeks faced these same problems. So it’s interesting to learn how they handled these issues. This book points out that they weren’t always successful. But this book also points out that the Greeks of antiquity still gave us much to think about in our modern world. This is the perfect book to stuff in your backpack for a short vacation…clearly written with lots of surprise facts contained in the text.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Actually I was enjoying the book most of the way through. Cahill writes well, without every drab detail that most history textbooks include. My disappointment started around chapter 7 'Greco-Roman Meets Judeo-Christian' where Cahill reveals his personal secular desire for separation of church and state. Worse, he takes it a step further and jumps on the Bush-bashing bandwagon, even specifically calling out Don Rumsfeld as an imperialist and criticizing the current administration for a 'dismissive' approach to the UN. Perhaps the author hadn't noticed the UN is filled with ruthless dictators and deep corruption. Sorry Mr. Cahill, you just alienated half of your fan base.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book interesting and fun to read. It's one of those rare finds in historical readings that actually engages the reader. Over all i would say that it was a good book. The only problem i saw with it is that it did get off track at some points.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While this book presents some interesting ideas, overall, I found it lacking and at times weak. This is pop-history. It is slanted in favor of the author's ancient Greek favorites, not simply in terms of who he presents as most significant, but also in terms of who he chooses to explore and explain (i.e. heavy on Athens and Plato very light on Sparta and Aristotle, etc). This book, like the others in The Hinges of History Series look very interesting, but now I have my doubts about the others. Even with such a short book, he could have done much more with this topic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wonderful introduction to Ancient Greek culture. Some points of his are striking to the reader, who would have never thought of such reality of the Ancient Greeks. It's amazing. It also features a number of images from artifacts, monuments and sculptures. I do remember there was one point, which I believe he saw too broadly... Blast, it's not coming to me now! Great book though!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed previous works but find this book particularly superficial and lacking any depth. Better options available.