Same Difference

Same Difference

by Siobhan Vivian

Paperback

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780545758024
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date: 11/25/2014
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 256,872
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author


Siobhan Vivian is the acclaimed author of Not That Kind of Girl, hailed by Kirkus Reviews as a “powerful, involving exploration of teen girls’ identities and relationships,” Same Difference, and A Little Friendly Advice. A Jersey girl by birth and a Brooklyn girl at heart, Siobhan currently lives in Pittsburgh, PA, and on the web at www.siobhanvivian.com.

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Same Difference 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
Lizzy96 More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed the book "Same Difference". It was a very different sort of book that lets you notice the small things in life that you should appreciate. It was about a girl, Emily, that had spent every summer of her whole life with her best friend, tanning in her back yard by the pool, just relaxing, and walking to Starbucks to get a mint mocha, lounge on the comfy chairs, while sharing the latest gossip. But when she signs up for an art class over the summer in Philadelphia, a monstrous city compared to her little borough, she doesn't know that she is in for a huge adventure. Emily's life is about to change right in front of her eyes. From new friends, to a whole new lifestyle, she sees that there is more to life than Starbucks and the new gossip from her fellow classmates. When Emily changes her perspective of life, everything changes along with her. I would highly recommend this book to anybody who wants to see the true meaning of life through teenage girls eyes.
Avid_Reader101 More than 1 year ago
This book is incredible! This book really helps you find self confidence and finding yourself. I would compare Emily to Rifka from Letters from Rifke They are both spunky,lost, and trying new things and finding new love which gets taken away. Emily is a 16 year old that lives in a gated community. She has moneyand a great life long best friend. She never knew she had a talent for art until one teacher opens her eyes. She gets a scholarship for a summer internship at a Phillidelphia school of Art. There she meets talented, beautiful,and self observent Fiona. They imediately become friends and they hang every second together. Emily drifts appart fm her friend at home. She becomes anew. Fiona isn;t what she seems and Emily and her get in a big fight. Emily discovers true friendship and romance with a 19 year old student teacher named Yates.
Livs_Book_Reviews More than 1 year ago
How can you not love Siobhan Vivian? Seriously. I follow both her personal blog and The Longstockings (not to sound creeper-ish), and everything she writes is just so alive and enjoyable. That being said, Same Difference was pretty dang good. So you know how Sarah Dessen has a kind of trademarked romantic style/plot concept that's present in all of her books? Well for Siobhan, she's got a friendship style. In A Little Friendly Advice, her first book, she focused on the dynamics of the relationships between a group of girls. They were going through a difficult stage in their lives and in their friendship, and they all grew from it and became better people because of their experiences. In Same Difference it's the same sort of troubled friendship plot line but it's different enough that it feels fresh and unique. In this book, the main character is going through a huge stage of self-discovery. She has to decide whether she wants to become a crazy artsy girl with the help of her new "friend" Fiona or whether she wants to stick with her roots and live a plain dreary life in Cherry Hill. But the book was so much more than that one little decision. In the beginning, Emily had no idea who she was or who she wanted to be. Throughout the book she learned how to make new friends, create beautiful art, and still stay true to who she was at her core. She even got to have a little forbidden romance. And that's the part that didn't work for me - the romance. Yates was Emily's teacher's assistant. He was two years older than her and didn't have much of a personality. Truthfully, they didn't have much, if any chemistry at all. It was just so flat. They were able to sit and draw pictures of each other but they weren't able to have a meaningful, colorful conversation. And the fact that he didn't see through Emily and Fiona's fake friendship doesn't do much for him. Also, I didn't really get why Emily was dumb enough to stick with Fiona for the whole entire story. Fiona made her feel like crap and she was so caught up in her own stupid views that she couldn't take a minute to look around at the rest of the world. Emily seemed like a very bright, and genuine girl and the fact that she was sucked into Fiona's antics for almost the whole story was sort of a let-down. But other than that, the book was good. The setting was extremely vivid, the conversations were true to life, and all the art lingo seemed really well researched and thought out to me. And Emily was a very teen-like girl. She made some of the same dumb decisions that I would have if I was in her shoes and yet she still followed her heart. I liked how in the end she learned how to get the best out of both worlds - art land and suburbia. Also, I was super happy that she didn't ditch Meg. Because Meg was sooo cute. As was the fact that Emily's little sister was starting to get all artsy and defiant at the end of the book; she was following in her sister's footsteps. Aw! There were just so many cute and fun little moments in this book that made me smile. It's such a great feel-good read. My only advice to Siobhan Vivian would be to steer away from the romance in the future and focus more on the friendships. That's her strong point, I think. Although I do hope that there are some romantic moments in her next book because I want to see what she cooks up next. :) I love Siobhan and I loved this book. Read it.
ericajsc on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Emily is not happy with her life the way it is, but her discontent lurks beneath the surface. In her attempt to sweep away her dissatisfaction, she slowly becomes immersed in this new artistic world, letting go of her life in Cherry Grove little by little. I think her reaction to the vastly different worlds she travels is a common one. It¿s the old adage that the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. Because things are getting difficult in Cherry Grove, she teeters to the other side of the spectrum, somehow convinced that things will be better if she leaves her past behind her. But problems creep in, and instead of dealing with one set of problems, she¿s forced to deal with two. Her story is about her figuring out that she needs to balance who she was with who she is becoming, and discovering how to do just that.Emily is fairly passive, afraid to really speak her mind for fear of not being understood or upsetting someone. Because of this, the book is powered by her internal reactions and perceptions. As the story progresses Emily slowly finds her voice. She doesn¿t make a radical personality change; she¿s still low-key and quiet. But she¿s grown as a person and come to a greater understanding of who she really wants to be.Meg and Fiona, her friends representing Cherry Grove and Philadelphia, respectively, both annoyed me, to be honest. I don¿t mean that they were written poorly, but the characters themselves were annoying. Meg was whiny and clingy; I could see why she would be hurt by Emily¿s absence and changes, but she was pretty selfish herself and wasn¿t willing to listen to Emily until she yelled loud enough to be heard. Fiona was overbearing and arrogant; even though Emily found her to be inspirational, I think Emily¿s personality was too weak for Fiona and she¿d always feel somewhat inferior and submissive to Fiona. Vivian does a good job of exploring the reasons behind both her friends¿ behavior, and I think the way the relationships stand at the end of the book fits the story well.Because, for better or worse, I was a lot like Emily when I was sixteen, I found the story to be a quick and attractive read. The development of Emily¿s talent for art over the course of the book gave me something to grab onto. However, I can see how others might find the pacing to be too slow. There is a romantic subplot to the story that I thought was a sweet addition, but Emily¿s struggle to find herself was the real draw for me.
Runa on LibraryThing 24 days ago
I started out completely disliking this book. The main character came off as completely shallow, describing and judging peoples' clothing obnoxiously, discussing her rich kid life as if it was no big deal. It was only later that I found out that the book is designed to make you hate her, and in a way, to make her hate herself, setting up for all the big changes she goes through. One thing that struck me from the beginning was the setting--an art camp. I believe I've read other books set at art camps, but this is the first that actually describes their exercises and not just life at camp. It's written in a way that both experienced artists and complete novices would understand what is going on in her art world. It's just incredibly unique as a book. The characters, too, are extremely three dimensional. I have jotted down in my notes "Fiona would have been a good main character", but going back, I don't know, I kind of feel like she already was. The book was more about her than anything, and I love that. This is why I was disappointed by the ending, where Fiona, the character that so much revolved around, got no resolution whatsoever. The book clearly has its ups and downs, but overall, it's one worth picking up.Rating: 4/5
kbpup903 on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Emily is searching for something: her true self. Summer in her hometown of Cherry Hill isn't as fun as it used to be since her best friend, Meg, got a boyfriend. Every time they hang out Emily feels like the third wheel. Finally, she finds something just for her. A two month summer art program at a nearby college in Philadelphia. She has always seemed to excel at drawing so she decided to give it a try.Little did she know that all the kids attending are way ahead of her. Most of them know exactly what they want to do with their lives after high school and most of their choices involve their art. The only reason Emily really liked art was because it was the one thing she was good at.As Emily is drawn deeper into her art and the lives of the students in her art class she starts to discover that she isn't the same person she always was. But is the new Emily the real Emily, or even the girl she wants to be?Sadly, I was a little disappointed in the main character of the book. The story was amazing but it seemed like Emily was lacking in maturity and her own sense of self. As the book begins Emily seems to be imitating her best friend Meg and as the book progresses she seems to begin to imitate her new friend, Fiona. She never really seemed to develop her own personality.I did enjoy this book and I would still recommend it because I still really liked the story. It's a very real portrayal of how you can get caught up in what others want you to be and put aside your true self to be something you're not.
Kimbrarian on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Emily Thompson is getting out of her South Jersey suburb to take art classes at a pre-college summer program in Philly. Detaching herself from her best friend Meg is not easy, especially when Emily has difficulty making friends at art school because she's more J.Crew than vintage. But as Emily's confidence grows in part because of her friendship with the fearless Fiona, and Meg's relationship with her boyfriend deepens, the girls naturally distance themselves from each other. Emily revels in her new persona; crashing art gallery openings and flirting with the teaching assistant. Yet having new friends does not mean giving up the loyal ones left behind, and Emily eventually realizes that not everyone is who they pretend to be. Vivian's talent is that she writes about very realistic and relatable teen experiences without being cliche. Teen girls in particular will be able to see themselves in this novel. Whether they identify with the attention-seeking Fiona or the slightly introverted Emily; they will no doubt find company in their own struggles with friendship, love, and self-expression. Vivian (A Little Friendly Advice) writes with intriguing insight, reliving those stressful and often confusing moments of adolescence where everything mattered so much.
ChristianR on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Emily has discovered she likes art and feels suffocated in her upscale suburban town. She enrolls in a summer art program in Philadelphia, and is especially wowed by Fiona, a really cool and confident classmate. As she pulls away from her best friend at home to spend more time with Fiona, she becomes baffled that not everyone else is quite so dazzled with Fiona. A touching story with very real characters and feelings.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A Plum. A purple fruit. Never thought I would be living there<p>I just had moved to Plum recently, and things had not been going well. After getting over the humiliation of living in a fruit like Spongebob, I had to face my worst fear. School. I moved from Springdale, wich has 57 kids in a grade, to Plum wich has 674. Goths, Preps, Jocks. Jesus! <p>But hey, that was last year. I turned our Alright. Right?<p>No. I learned how to fake a smile. I havent really smiled in 3 months. Until Brady came along.<p>-Mars-<br>(guys so sorry this was short. Next chapter is longer and its there. I wanted to write that first. And I am currently 14, struggling with all this)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gurl, u goin out on a date with ur eyeliner on?! Ur gonna look like a wratched witch!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
PlEase keep going!!! They are amazing!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic your amazing. &hearts Jade
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Hi, Luke." I smile as I pick up the phone. "Hello, Grace. I was wondering if you wanted to go to McDonald's with us?" Luke asks me and I look down at my hands. "Oh... uhm... I'm not allowed to go outside... unless it's my backyard." I say. "Then how do you shop?" Luke wonders. "I shop online." I respond. I hear Luke laugh on the other line. "Why don't you rebelle a little?" Luke suggests. Me? A rebel? I don't think it's possible. But I've got to try. "Sure." I finally say. "Okay. I'll pick you up soon." I can hear Luke's smile. "See you when you get here." I hang up. I look down at what I'm wearind and cringe. I walk toward my closet and take out noen yellow skinny jeans, a white v-neck and white Converse. Then I go to the bathroom and put on a little bit of eyeliner and mascara. I put my hair up in a messy bun and I put on my sapphire necklace as I hear Luke knock on the front door. I jump but then run toward the door and open it. I see Luke standing there with a smile on his face. "Are you ready?" Luke asks. "As ready as I'll ever be." I smile as I walk out the front door of my house for the first time ever.*********** I know, extremly short buuuuutttttt I wanted Grace's first expiernce outside to be special. And that includes a lot of writing. &#9829 A
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No sample it makes me want it more
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While the overall IDEA of the story was good, the way it was carried out could've been much better. It was too much like a trashy teen novel and definitely did not have enough substance to actually carry the point across. Also, I found about a dozen typos and sentences that weren't even half-way finished (which I know is the printer's fault, but still). It was not what I was expecting, and while it sounded interesting at first, when I actually read the book, I was extremely disappointed. It sounded too much like an annoying rich girl getting lost in finding herself and being a poser, which, yes, happens in adolescence, it definitely could've been written better. So, basically, I really didn't like it...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book over the summer and loved it! it really shows a teenagers real life in finding themselves.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a really good book...the message that it sends out is that to find your true self you have to do some wild things before reilizing that you are the person you are and you cant change that. I recomened this book to all my friends because it just talks about a girl and her challange to find her true self...it relates to alot of people.
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