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Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft Access 2002 Programming in 24 Hours
     

Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft Access 2002 Programming in 24 Hours

by Paul Kimmel
 

Sams Teach Yourself Access 2002 Programming in 24 Hours will considerably improve the quality of the database applications that the reader can create with Microsoft Access. Concise tutorials that quickly bring the reader up to speed will be the goal of each chapter. Having completed this book, the readers will be able to understand any sample VBA code that

Overview

Sams Teach Yourself Access 2002 Programming in 24 Hours will considerably improve the quality of the database applications that the reader can create with Microsoft Access. Concise tutorials that quickly bring the reader up to speed will be the goal of each chapter. Having completed this book, the readers will be able to understand any sample VBA code that they see, and will possess the skills to attack all of the most common Access programming tasks.

Topics covered in the book will include: ¨

  • Using data aware controls ¨
  • Creating data aware web pages ¨
  • Creating views to organize data ¨
  • Building reusable code modules ¨
  • Programming reports ¨
  • Communicating results with graphing ¨
  • Automating contact and task management with Outlook ¨
  • Access programming for Internet Explorer

    Editorial Reviews

    This tutorial for nonprogramming power users offers 24 one-hour, step- by-step lessons illustrated with screen shots, plus quizes and exercises, for programming in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), covering writing macros and converting macros to VBA code, writing and using classes, managing databases with code using ActiveX Data Objects, creating a Web site with Data Access Pages, and using PivotTable and PivotCharts for data presentation. Kimmel is founder of a software development and consulting company. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

    Product Details

    ISBN-13:
    9780672320989
    Publisher:
    Sams
    Publication date:
    08/28/2001
    Series:
    Sams Teach Yourself Series
    Pages:
    576
    Product dimensions:
    7.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)

    Read an Excerpt

    Hour 1: What's New in Access 2002

    Access 2002 programming is more exciting than ever. Access 2002 has incorporated advanced programming features that promote object-oriented programming. Usability features, such as side panes, enhanced editing and spell checking, menu and toolbar customizations, and speech command and control make using Access easier than ever. Online collaboration is added, via NetMeeting, to facilitate user and developer collaboration over the Internet. The more powerful ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) make it easier than ever to program databases in Access 2002. Access 2002 also enables you to write stored procedures, create database Web pages, and easily scale to Microsoft SQL Server with the Microsoft Access Project.

    Collectively, these features will enable you to build database applications more easily, build Web-enabled solutions, scale to a client/server database platform (SQL Server), and write and share object-oriented code among Visual Basic and other VBA-enabled Windows Office 2002 applications. In this hour, I will introduce these features and demonstrate how to use some of them. Features not explicitly demonstrated in this hour (because they require more space than this hour allows) will be clearly demonstrated in the rest of this book. In this hour, you will learn

    • How to customize the enhanced IDE
    • How to use the built-in spell checker
    • How to configure and use Online Collaboration
    • How to use the Data Page Wizard

    New Side Panes for Easier Navigation

    Access 2002 includes a Task (or Side) Pane View. If the side pane is not visible when you start Access, right-click over the toolbar and click Task Pane from the context menu. The task pane makes it easy to open existing databases and create new databases (from tem- plates installed with Access or online at Microsoft). You can also create a Network Place. Network Places are folders which may reside on your local PC or somewhere else, accessible by a URL (uniform resource locator; for example, http://www.softconcepts.com.)

    The Open File group of the task pane contains recently opened databases. The New File group offers quick choices for creating new databases. The Choose File option in the New from Existing File group displays the Explorer, allowing you to search for files. New from Template allows you to pick from various templates on your PC and at Microsoft's Web site. Add Network Place allows you to create a folder that resides at the other end of a URL.

    If you don't want the task pane showing up at startup, you can simply uncheck the Show at Startup box.

    Customizing Menus and Toolbars

    Access 2002 enables you to personalize menus and toolbars. You can display a limited set of menus or toolbars or allow Access to automatically list them based on how frequently you use them. Toolbars can be moved, resized, inserted, or extracted from the menu bar, enabling you to position them where it is convenient for you to work with them. (For an example, see Hour 19, "Creating Custom Forms and Reports." The section "Adding a Menu Item to Access" demonstrates how to customize menu items for your applications.)

    Another new feature is the capability to associate a hyperlink to a toolbar or menu, providing you with direct access to resources on the World Wide Web or an intranet.

    Using the More Menu Item

    Access 2002 only shows a limited subset of the menu items available. The More menu item displays the remaining menu items available for a particular menu (see Figure 1.1). When you select a menu item that isn't automatically displayed, that item is added to the list of items that are displayed without clicking the More menu item.

    Hiding some of the menu items simplifies the appearance of menus, making them easier to use. This feature also adapts to accommodate your usage of the available feature set.

    Personalizing Menus and Toolbars

    The Move handle, shown in Figure 1.2 (adjacent to the resize mouse cursor), can be clicked and dragged to customize the organization of your menus and toolbars.

    Both menus and toolbars can be anchored to the top of the main window or remain free floating. This feature allows you to personalize the Access 2002 interface to make it easier to work the way you want it to work. To unanchor a toolbar or menu, click the menu or toolbar's Move handle and drag it from the edge of the frame. To anchor a menu or toolbar, drag it to the edge of the window frame.

    Many other menus and toolbars are available, as shown in Figure 1.3, that you can manually show and hide. However, these toolbars and menus are typically displayed in the context in which they are needed.

    Click Tools, Customize to display the menu- and toolbar-customization dialog.

    To display additional available menus, place your mouse cursor over any available menu or toolbar and click the right mouse button. From the pop-up menu, click the Customize menu item. On the Toolbars tab of the Customize dialog, place a check mark next to the toolbars you want displayed and uncheck the toolbars you want hidden....

    Meet the Author

    Paul Kimmel is the founder of Software Conceptions. Software Conceptions provides software development and consulting services to small, medium, and large companies worldwide. Paul has been developing business solutions in Microsoft Access for more than 10 years and is available for consulting and development projects (at pkimmel@softconcepts.com).

    Paul is the author of several books on Visual Basic and Access programming, including the upcoming Visual Basic.NET Unleashed, and is the co-author of Sams Microsoft Access 2002 Development Unleashed. Paul is the weekly author of the free newsletter Code Guru Visual Basic Tech Notes from Internet.com. Paul resides in Okemos, Michigan with wife Lori and children Trevor, Douglas, Alex, and Noah, all accompanied by their assorted critters.

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