Sanditon: Jane Austen's Unfinished Masterpiece Completed

Sanditon: Jane Austen's Unfinished Masterpiece Completed

by Jane Austen, Juliette Shapiro
3.2 11

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Sanditon: Jane Austen's Unfinished Masterpiece Completed 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
TheBookmaiden More than 1 year ago
Don't waste your time or money. The author who continued Austen's novel has not only a poor grasp of Austen's writing style and her intended direction of plot and characters, but also of the conventions and sensibilities of the time. Shaphiro confuses Austen with Richardson, the author whom Austen so properly and efficaciously derides in Sanditon. These are sad and unnecessary errors as all but one key player had been fully set up, and the character of that one can be well surmised by contrasting the unreliable, though well meant, accounts from other characters with their previous errors of judgement. Even more irritating, Shapiro shows a lack of respect for and an unaccountable disregard of Austen's style and the time period by going wild with the Pamela reference and including a rape in her first solo chapter - besides more prosaic aberrations. She doesn't even execute said scene well, concocting a very implausible and illogical rape and discovery that completely ignores Austen's delineation of Sir Denham's character and ambitions - namely that he did not immediately plan a dastardly deed, but rather, would save such a scheme as a pleasant but final recourse. I have some doubt that he actually would or could have carried out the sort of plan he admired as he is romantic in the silliest sense, full of air and not terribly intelligent, while his quarry appears to be both shrewd and awake to his affectations and designs - which insights anyone of reasonable intelligence could discern from his pedantic drivel. So basically don't bother with the continuation of this book - you'll immediately notice where Austen ends and Shapiro begins because the characters start being rewritten and the quality of prose drops, though not as badly as some Austen imitators. It's the overeager plot jumps, fundamental character revisions, and loss of conversation as the mode of expressing plot and characters that got me and prevented me from finishing this book. Perhaps someone less enamored with the style of the time and author would enjoy this book, blithely being able to put to the side its flaws of authenticity and credibility.
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