Save as Draft

Save as Draft

by Cavanaugh Lee

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781439190715
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication date: 02/14/2012
Pages: 336
Product dimensions: 5.70(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Cavanaugh Lee was raised in San Francisco and received her undergraduate degree from UCLA’s School of Theatre and received her law degree from UNC. By day, she is a federal prosecutor in Savannah, Georgia and by night she is searching for true love and working on the sequel to Save as Draft.

Read an Excerpt

JANUARY 2008: DATELESS … BUT NOT DESPERATE
Sent:Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 7:31 PMFrom:IzabellTo:ElizabethSubject:Tough Times All Around
E—

Did you know that the single guy to single girl ratio in this city is 1 to 8???!!!! Is this really true? This can’t be true. Ugh, maybe that explains my fourth consecutive month of NOT dating here in the ATL, or pseudo-dating (translation: hanging out with best guy friend who has no interest in me sexually or otherwise).

I tell ya, it’s tough times all around …

—Izzy
Sent:Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 7:35 PMFrom:ElizabethTo:IzabellSubject:Re: Tough Times All Around
Online dating. Try it.

And, FYI: your “best guy friend” has been hot for your bod for two years now—don’t fish for compliments.
Sent:Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 7:38 PMFrom:IzabellTo:ElizabethSubject:Re: Tough Times All Around
Online dating will NOT be happening. So unromantic. Not my style. And, no, on the contrary, my “best guy friend” really is just that—my “best guy friend.”

—“Idealistically Opposed to Online Dating Izzy”
Sent:Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 8:05 PMFrom:ElizabethTo:IzabellSubject:Re: Tough Times All Around
Suit yourself. My friend, Jen, met a guy on eHarmony or Match or whatever the hell and now they’re getting married this summer.
Sent:Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 8:10 PMFrom:IzabellTo:ElizabethSubject:Re: Tough Times All Around
Yeah, right, my luck, it’ll be e(DIS)Harmony or NON-Match. I would never, ever subject myself to being rejected ON-line. It’s bad enough being rejected IN-person. My computer is the only safe haven I have left.
Sent:Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 8:12 PMFrom:ElizabethTo:IzabellSubject:Re: Tough Times All Around
Methinks the lady doth protest too much …
Draft:Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 8:13 PMFrom:IzabellTo:ElizabethSubject:Re: Tough Times All Around
This e-mail was written but not sent and will save as Draft until further action.

Fine. I’ll consider it. But only to prove you wrong!
Sent:Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 11:38 PMFrom:IzabellTo:ElizabethSubject:Re: Tough Times All Around
Sorry, not gonna happen. I may be dateless, but NOT desperate.
Sent:Wednesday, January 2, 2008 at 9:09 AMFrom:eHarmonyTo:IzabellSubject:eHarmony: At a Discount–Get 2 Months FREE!
Get a 3-month subscription for the price of 1! Yes, that means “3 for 1”! Let us make it easier for you to find by giving you an extra TWO MONTHS FREE.

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© 2011 Cavanaugh Lee

Customer Reviews

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Save as Draft 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
RtBBlog More than 1 year ago
Review by Stephanie: s a charming novel that's bound to leave you hanging and frustrated at end, the very first epistolary fiction piece I've read since Paula Danziger's Snail Mail, No More. Written entirely in emails, text messages, and Twitter updates, this book is sweepingly honest, as well as full of emotion. There lies a secret thrill in being able to peek inside someone's private life, especially in an era that is so dependent on internet communication. Cavanaugh Lee does not stop there. The essence of Save as Draft delves even deeper than the privacy of a password-protected email account, because the reader gets the inside scoop on what the characters don't. Emails that have been "saved as draft" or in less-techy terms, written but unsent, are revealed, opening up a whole nother road in knowing what the characters are actually thinking. Izzy and Peter, the engaged couple, seemingly have everything paved out ahead of them. But miscommunication and too many saved drafts take a toll on the passionate relationship. You'll love reading how their relationship builds, climaxes, and abruptly falls, making you both cringe(because of how closely this hits to home -- this might as well be YOUR love life in YOUR email account) and smile (from the wit and the glad-it-wasn't-me! incidents) all within the same page. I love how the plot is conveyed through Facebook notifications (Izabell Chin has added you as a friend on Facebook) and eHarmony profiles to develop characters. It's a fun, flirty way to get to know the protagonists and the main conflicts. The ending made me so mad, but I couldn't have made it any more perfect. I won't give any spoilers, but I will say that it was sort of a tragic ending. Meaning, things do not end happily-ever-after as predicted. The ending is happy yes, just not the way I had thought it would be. Save as Draft is a heartbreakingly realistic novel that demonstrates human error in the ways we never speak what we think...and never think what we say speak either.
njmom3 on LibraryThing 8 months ago
A book written entirely in emails, text messages, tweets, and Facebook posts. The book does a good job of telling the story of relationships and especially of the things we leave unsaid. It also delves into the world of online dating. It is very quick to read despite its length and does develop the story and characters despite its abbreviated format.This concept is not new. It used to be the books written as letters. Now in the electronic world, it is tweets and texts.
abcarroll on LibraryThing 8 months ago
cute book filled with emails, tweets, and drafts of emails. How relationships can turn out when we don't say what we want to say. Quick read and enjoyable.
JackieBlem on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This book catches your eye, with it's shiny, hard silver cover, reminiscent of a small laptop. Which is appropriate, since the story it contains is told completely through emails, texts, Facebook status, BlackBerry messenger and dating site profiles. And the amazing thing is, debut author Cavanaugh Lee pulls it off with style. This is a funny, quick, and embarrassingly accurate (for those of us slaves to the social media or who ever dipped our toes into the internet dating scene, at least) portrayal of life and love in the media age. She even includes a glossary of sorts for those of us who don't speak text. This a quick and funny read that will have you laughing, blushing, annoyed or teary at any given moment, but always, always it will make you turn the page to see just what is going to happen next. Original and clever, this prosecutor by day and author by night with a fresh new voice is someone to keep your eye on.
kalky on LibraryThing 8 months ago
"Save as Draft" is the mostly fun and sometimes sad story of Izabell "Izzy" Chin's adventures in dating as told through a series of e-mails, text messages, facebook notifications, and tweets. I'm not typically a fan of Chick Lit, but Cavanaugh Lee tells a great story and manages what should have been a clunky method of doing so beautifully. The key to getting the back story is the unsent messages to which the reader is privy -- and it adds a nice "what if" dimension to the novel as well. Izzy and her friends are smart and fun twenty-somethings, but women of all ages will be able to relate to them and their dating/married lives. The men could have easily been cardboard characters, but peeking into their draft folder fleshes them out nicely and makes them just as real and well drawn as the female characters. The book also illustrates the joys as well as the pitfalls of relying on electronic communication in relationships.This is a quick and easy read (I finished the book in a day), and it would be a great novel to add to your summertime or vacation stack.
ReadingWithMartinis on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This book was all kinds of sweet, cute, and fun! The entire novel is told via emails, text messages, Facebook updates, and tweets! I don't honestly think I have read a novel before where the format of the novel was so fun, hip, and timely!The story itself is a familiar one. Izabell is unlucky in the love department. Every time she thinks she is on solid footing, the guy ends of being less than stellar. A product of the technology age, Izabell's unfortunate love life is told via the technology we all know and love (usually). Lee did an excellent job telling the story in an unconventional narrative construct and managing to keep the reader interested beyond the unusual format.This book was a very quick, fun, totally enjoyable read. Cavanaugh Lee is an author I will definitely be keeping an eye on!
ennie on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Told entirely in e-mails, text messages and other electronic communication, this novel traces the life and loves of a young lawyer. Lightning fast read.
coolmama on LibraryThing 8 months ago
What a delightful book.Read it in one sitting....the evolution (and de-evolution) of a relationship all told via email to eachother (and what gets saved, but not sent)Fun fun fun!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jody Best More than 1 year ago
This is a book written in forms of texts, twitter updates and (mainly) emails. "Save as Draftz" is s realistic and clever romance novel that I, personally stayed up all night to read. Unconventional at best, but worth reading, nonetheless. Spoiler: may not be the best book for you if you need spelled out endings. Otherwise, highly reccomended, enjoy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LinZ7 More than 1 year ago
I read the book in 2 days and couldn't put it down. I can't wait for another book to come out by Lee.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TEST NOOKUSER More than 1 year ago
This book hits very close to home for most people in our generation. Though I flew through the book, the ending leftbme unsatisfied. But I suppose that's real life for you? I was rooting for the eharm guy the whole time, so his sudden change in demenor upset me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Natalie Humphreys More than 1 year ago
Save As Draft caught my attention because it's how we communicate today, so why not pick a book that half the world can relate too? I couldn't put the book down, I read it in a few hours. After I read it I was extremely dissapointed, I wanted more! I could not believe I wasted my money on this book! Maybe a sequel could change that, life after the storm....
TheStephanieLoves More than 1 year ago
Save as Draft is a charming novel that's bound to leave you hanging and frustrated at end, the very first epistolary fiction piece I've read since Paula Danziger's Snail Mail No More. Written entirely in emails, text messages, and Twitter updates, this book is sweepingly honest, as well as full of emotion. There lies a secret thrill in being able to peek inside someone's private life, especially in an era that is so dependent on internet communication. Cavanaugh Lee does not stop there. The essence of Save as Draft delves even deeper than the privacy of a password-protected email account, because the reader gets the inside scoop on what the characters don't. Emails that have been "saved as draft" or in less-techy terms, written but unsent, are revealed, opening up a whole nother road in knowing what the characters are actually thinking. Izzy and Peter, the engaged couple seemingly have everything paved out ahead of them. But miscommunication and too many saved drafts take a toll on the passionate relationship. You'll love reading how their relationship builds, climaxes, and abruptly falls, making you both cringe (because of how closely this hits to home -- this might as well be YOUR love life in YOUR email account) and smile (from the wit and the glad-it-wasn't-me! incidents) all within the same page. I love how the plot is conveyed through Facebook notifications (Izabell Chin has added you as a friend on Facebook) and eHarmony profiles to develop characters. It's a fun, flirty way to get to know the protagonists and the main conflicts. The ending made me so mad, but I couldn't have made it any more perfect. I won't give any spoilers, but I will say that it was sort of a tragic ending. Meaning, things do not end happily-ever-after as predicted. The ending is happy yes, just not the way I had thought it would be. Save as Draft is a heartbreakingly realistic novel that demonstrates human error in the ways we never speak what we think...and never think what we say speak either.
Reads4Pleasure More than 1 year ago
Save as Draft is an updated version of You've Got Mail with a healthy dose of humor and, so far, one of the best things I've read this year. First time author Cavanaugh Lee takes readers along on the adventures of the sparkling Izabell (Izzy) Chin as she balances her romantic and familial relationships, along with friendships. Told through a series of e-mails, FaceBook postings and tweets, Save as Draft is a "girl meets boy, girl dates other boys, girl dates original boy, boy loses girl, another boy finds girl, boy wants girl back" story. Confused? Well sure, it takes a minute to get everyone straight, but you'll have absolutely no trouble understanding what's going on. Mixed in with Izzy's tweets, postings and e-mails with various characters are the draft versions of emails. These are the most honest of everything the characters say because they portray their true feelings. We've all had moments when we typed an e-mail that really expressed how we felt, but hit "save as draft" instead of send. As a reader, I found myself wishing the characters had the nerve to hit send. In some instances they finally did, but in others true feelings were never expressed, which made me wonder if things would have turned out differently had those feelings been made known. Ms. Lee is at work on a sequel, so I guess we'll have to wait to find out. What did you like about this book? It's gives a very accurate portrayal of how people interact today. With texting, tweeting, Facebooking and e-mail, it really is possible to conduct a relationship and go for extended periods of time without talking to someone by phone. Is that a good or a bad thing? Unless you truly know someone, and sometimes even if you do, it can be difficult to read their tone through electronic communication. Another thing communicating electronically does it take away face to face time. Since the characters already know each other, for the most part, it's not until maybe midway through the book that the reader learns Izzy is Asian-American. And that only comes out as a result of a conversation that she has with someone she's met through an online service. Up until that point, I don't know that I had an image of her in my head. Not knowing what she looked like didn't take away from the story. And when I realized that she wasn't the typical "white chick" of chick lit, I gladly added her to my Colorful Chick Lit list. What didn't you like about the book? I don't like not knowing what's going to happen next. I was so sure that Izzy and another character would re-connect, but that didn't happen. It's almost like feeling happy for your friend when she gets what she wants, but, as a friend, you think you know what's better for her. So while I'm happy that she's happy, I'd really like her to see with the guy I think she should be with. Does that make sense? What could the author do to improve this book? Finish writing the sequel, because I'm dying to see what happens next!
CLT_ChickLitLover More than 1 year ago
I'm a huge Chick Lit reader and was lucky enough to read an advance copy of "Save as Draft." What a fun read! The book is totally written in the media we all use on a daily basis to tell our own stories: texts, emails, facebook status updates, tweets and internet dating profiles. As you read, it's almost as if you are one of Izzy's friends, following her travails by email and text as she juggles two love interests with a demanding job as an attorney. The reader can totally identify with her kooky group of friends as they chime in with their individual opinions regarding work, love and life. Each chapter ends with a teaser that forces you to keep reading, until you find yourself giggling your way to the end of the book. I highly recommend. Oh, and the cover is way cool!