The Scandal of the Evangelical Conscience: Why Are Christians Living Just Like the Rest of the World?

The Scandal of the Evangelical Conscience: Why Are Christians Living Just Like the Rest of the World?

by Ronald J. Sider

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Overview

Ron Sider asserts that "by their daily activity, most 'Christians' regularly commit treason. With their mouths they claim that Jesus is their Lord, but with their actions they demonstrate their allegiance to money, sex, and personal self-fulfillment."
In this candid and challenging book, Sider addresses an embarrassing reality: most Christians' lives are no different from the lives of their secular neighbors. Hedonism, materialism, racism, egotism, and many other undesirable traits are commonplace among Christians.
Rather than simply a book bemoaning the state of American Christianity today, The Scandal of the Evangelical Conscience offers readers solutions to repair the disconnect between belief and practice. While it's not easy medicine to take, this book is a much-needed prophetic call to transformed living.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780801065415
Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/01/2005
Pages: 144
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.45(d)

About the Author

Ronald J. Sider is president of Evangelicals for Social Action and professor of theology, holistic ministry, and public policy at Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary. The author of more than twenty books, he resides in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Scandal of the Evangelical Conscience: Why Are Christians Living Just like the Rest of the World? 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Woodstock13 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Many people like this book. I don't have much appetite for "Christian" books which alarm. I would prefer to read books that stimulate my appetite.
pomorev on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Once you get past the alarmist introduction, Sider really has a good proposal. I am appreciative of how he calls for a rethinking of the content of the gospel. His treatment of sin gives a good pause to consider how our oversimplification of the gospel has not served us as Christians. I'm not always convinced of the details, especially in terms of his treatment of homosexuality, but Sider's project is an overall good one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago