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Product Details

Release Date: 10/29/2013
Label: Brilliant Classics
UPC: 5028421944777
catalogNumber: 94477
Rank: 82231

Tracks

  1. Sonata for keyboard (or solo instrument & continuo) in D minor, K. 89 (L. 211)
  2. Sonata for keyboard (or solo instrument & continuo) in D minor, K. 77 (L. 168)
  3. Sonata for keyboard (or solo instrument & continuo) in D minor, K. 90 (L. 106)
  4. Sonata for keyboard (or solo instrument & continuo) in G minor, K. 88 (L. 36)
  5. Sonata for keyboard (or solo instrument & continuo) in E minor, K. 81 (L. 271)
  6. Sonata for keyboard (or solo instrument & continuo) in G major, K. 91 (L. 176)

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Scarlatti: Mandolin Sonatas 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
OscarOVeterano1 More than 1 year ago
Artemandoline – “Scarlatti: Mandolin Sonatas” – Brilliant Classics Artemandoline is an internationally acclaimed group of virtuoso instrumentalists led by Mari Fe Pavon (baroque mandolin) and Manuel Munoz (baroque guitar), with Jean-Daniel Haro (viola da gamba) and Jean-Christophe (harpsichord), who perform music from original source manuscripts on authentic period (in this case, 18th century) instruments. The group’s hypothesis for this particular collection of sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti is that each was written for mandolin and basso continuo, rather than violin or harpsichord, as is more commonly supposed. While the very thorough and informative liner notes make their case seem, at a minimum, academically plausible, it is Artemandoline’s lively performance of Scarlatti’s music that lends their idea its real credibility. Their happy mix of skill, virtuosity and research results in a sound that is, at once, well thought out and spontaneous, early music played less for its scholarly or historical interest than for its sheer beauty. ”Scarlatti: Mandoline Sonatas” by Artemandoline can be highly recommended to the general listener and specialist alike and is a welcome reminder that, however “serious” modern audiences may consider it, chamber music was originally intended to be entertainment. Highest possible recommendation 10 out of 10 Oscar O. Veterano