Science in Europe, 1500-1800: A Secondary Sources Reader

Science in Europe, 1500-1800: A Secondary Sources Reader

by Malcolm Oster

Hardcover(2001)

$113.99

Overview

Organized to accompany Science in Europe, 1500-1800: a Primary Sources Reader, this innovative book collects key critical, analytical, and historical writings on the Scientific Revolution. Included is a broad, balanced range of voices, on such topics as the origins of modern science, the role of experiments in scientific progress, nationalism and science, patronage and censorship.

Author Biography: Malcolm Oster is Staff Tutor at the Open University.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780333970058
Publisher: Macmillan Education UK
Publication date: 10/30/2001
Edition description: 2001
Pages: 307
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.04(d)

About the Author

MALCOLM OSTER is a Staff Tutor and Lecturer in History of Science at the Open University.

Table of Contents

Introduction.- Europe's Awakening.- Copernicus and his Revolution.- The Spread of Copernicanism in Northern Europe.- Crisis in Italy.- Iberian Science.- Science from the Earth in Central Europe.- French Science in the Seventeenth Century.- Science in Seventeenth-Century England.- Scientific Academies across Europe.- The Reception of Newtonianism across Europe.- Science in the Scottish Enlightenment.- Science on the Fringe of Europe: Eighteenth-Century Sweden.- Science in orthodox Europe.- Establishing Science in Eighteenth-Century Europe.- The Chemical Revolution.- Conclusions.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

With a knowledgeable instructor, these readers could support and undergraduate course.' - J. McClellan III, Choice

'...offer both student and teacher an accessible path into the world of early modern science and the recent attempts to capture its diversity, and significance.' - John Gasgoigne, Journal of Religious History

'...those who wish to teach themselves, or others, about the Scientific Revolution would be well advised to use these books as their starting point.' - Dr John Henry, British Journal for the History of Science

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