The Science of the Mind / Edition 2

The Science of the Mind / Edition 2

by Owen Flanagan
5.0 2
ISBN-10:
0262560569
ISBN-13:
9780262560566
Pub. Date:
03/05/1991
Publisher:
MIT Press
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The Science of the Mind 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm an undergraduate student in Cognitive Science and I think this book provides a really good introduction to the major philosophical issues involved in Psychology and Cognitive Science. Flanagan discusses at length dualism, James, Freud, behavorism, Piaget, cog science/artificial intelligence, sociobiology, and offers the beginnings for a theory of consciousness. The book is a bit lacking in its discussion of epiphenominalism, but is overall a great introductory text for a beginning college student or interested adult.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a required book in a graduate course I took (advanced general psychology). It is a must read for anyone interested in the mind/body problem. It starts with Descartes and runs through the present approaches. It is very philosophical in its treatment of the scientific approaches to the mind/body question. It is also very thorough and accurate in its explainations of difficult material. Its longest sections deal with artificial intelligence(AI). Many AI views are covered in a scientific manner but not to the point the more philosophical reader would loss interest. It has good sections also on behaviorism and sociobilogy.